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Sunday, September 7, 2008

Country Cooking

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The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Introduction
The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook was written as an invitation for you to join us at The Quilt Inn, to savor not only the joy of bountiful down-home cooking, but to drink in the pleasures of country inn living. We are itinerant travellers and country inn lovers, and we have selected and savored the best recipes of all the ones that we have tried, to create the essence of "inn-ness" for you. We've collected our favorite dishes, and memories, and spread them out for you here on our harvest table for you to sample and enjoy. When you re-create these recipes for yourself, and as the homey smells of country cooking waft through your own kitchen, we hope you will be transported to The Quilt Inn where a warm welcome awaits you. People often ask us where The Quilt Inn is located, and when then can come visit us. The Quilt Inn is that mythic sort of place, like Camelot, that rises unexpectedly and fortuitously at the end of a long day to give haven to the weary traveller. We've all been to The Quilt Inn, if only in our hearts. The Quilt Inn is old and cozy, just like one of Grandma's beloved and faded quilts it was named for. Whenever we are weary and bleary-eyed we can wrap it around us, and sink into its warmth. In Spring, we find the Inn in a cozy valley blanketed with snowy white cherry and peach blossoms. In Summer, we find it perched atop a breezy hill where the verdant treetops rustle like yards of crisp taffeta swooshing overhead. In Autumn, we find it at the end of a long narrow lane bordered by rows of trees in riotous colored patchwork. In Winter, we find it etched sharply in delicate filigrees of ice as our footsteps crunch noisily across the big snowy fields toward a wisp of smoke and warmth. It is everywhere different, and everywhere the same. It is the best of welcoming places. Welcome to The Quilt Inn.

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
Everybody's From Somewhere
As Michael and I travelled around the country collecting stories for our memories and recipes for the Inn, we've enjoyed visiting small towns everywhere. I avoid highways whenever possible and go out of my way to find the "grey roads" on the map. They are the old roads, that lead meandering routes from town to town, left behind by the "red" and important superhighways. I often get us lost, but even that's OK. Getting lost can lead you to some place more interesting than where you were heading. Strange, that. A wise man said, "When you are on a trip and your destination seems to move further and further away, you know that it was the journey you were after, not the destination." Early on we noticed that almost every town we visited had a sign at the town limits proudly boasting a native son or daughter who had gone on to fame and fortune, supposedly elsewhere. Now we're on the lookout for those wonderful telltale signs. I think we've found the home of every Miss America since 1957. We found football, basketball and baseball stars who made it past local high school hero to world class competitor. We found singers and musicians who probably drove the neighbors crazy, were the ne'r-do-wells at the time, probably now laughing, and strumming, all the way to the bank. In the "Who's Who" of towns, (or perhaps that should be the "Where's Where"), is there a pecking order of luminaries? If your town can brag only of a Regional Lawn Bowling Champion, are you less of an address than a town strutting a Miss America or a Hall of Famer? It's a comfortable reminder that everybody is from somewhere. And driving around any somebody's home town lets us see a glimpse of their past and perhaps their burning motivation for achieving success elsewhere. We wonder how those home towns fare in the memories of native sons and daughters. Happy nostalgia of childhood? Or, couldn't wait to leave nightmares. All those towns are everywhere different and everywhere the same. They are towns without pity, towns from hell, or even towns with no name (Clint Eastwood)

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Aliske Webb
characters live there). It may be twenty-four hours from somewhere or 1,000 miles from nowhere. Or even South of the Border. And every town has the same sides. Every town has its uptown, downtown Saturday night. Its ever musical east side, west side. Everywhere you find stray cats roaming the alleys. Inevitably some good old boy is headed for the cheating side of town, while someone else is coming back from Heartache Avenue to the lonely side of town. There's the seamy side of town, where Skid Row is, at the end of a dead end street. You may see uptown girls waiting for their downtown men. There are girls from the bad side of town, standing underneath the lamp post, and boys from the wrong side of the tracks, having back street affairs. That's a lotta sides for one town. You may have arrived there at the bus stop on the mean streets or at a liveried abode on Easy street. You may have taken the straight and narrow or the long and winding road. Or even the Yellow Brick Road. You may have been lead down the primrose path or taken the road less travelled to the crossroad where fates are decided. If you're street smart, take the streeetcar named "Desire" back to the street where you live on the sunny side of the street. Wherever we journey away to, there are always blue highways that lead you to the back roads by the rivers of your memories, ever smiling, ever gentle, on your mind. And now to the stories and recipes.
The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
Swing Time
On warm lazy afternoons I like to take a cool drink and lie in the hammock. It's located in the middle of the front lawn, so it's far enough away from the porch that no one can easily talk to you and disturb your reveries yet close enough to be summoned if necessary. Michael has learned that it requires a three alarm fire to warrant calling me out of the hammock. It's a place I need to go when I'm mad at him for some reason or other. As Goethe said, "In a good marriage we become the guardians of each other's solitude." The hammock came to live with us from Mexico. It used to be gaudy Fiesta- colored, but it's toned down somewhat and mellowed a lot since and I believe it's trying to approach a respectable earth-toned appearance in order to fit into our decor. It's slung between two huge century trees, Centurion trees. One willow. The other, oak. When the trees were originally and symbolically planted in the farmyard they were appealingly close together. Now that they are monster trees they are far too close together and make an odd coupling. The bent over willow symbolizes flexibility and change, with its long, slender, supple leaves that swish softly in the wind, it stands beside the starchy, upright oak with its broad stiff leaves that rustle crisply and irritably, and symbolizes strength and stability. These are trees that speak two different leaf languages. Yet like yin and yang, they are opposites that complement and complete each other into a wholeness. Their branches intertwine bizarrely. The willow seems to flow into the oak's stiff embrace, like an oddly coupled marriage. An artificially arranged marriage at that. Yet here they are, generations later, still standing side by side, rooted and symbiotic. They've grown around each other, accommodated each other. Given each other space to grow. If one were to be cut down now, there would be spaces among the remaining one's branches, like an empty embrace. Yes, just like a marriage. And here I lie swinging between the two trees. Sometimes I am a willow. Sometimes I am oak.

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Aliske Webb
Cool drinks to sit n' sip and put you in the mood. The most famous classic of all,
I think...
Mint Julep
1 tsp. granulated sugar
1 tsp. water
4 fresh mint leaves
fine crushed ice
3 oz. Bourbon
1 fresh mint sprig
Combine sugar, water and ice in a tall chilled glass until sugar is dissolved. Add
ice to 3/4 full. Add Bourbon and stir gently. Freeze for 15 minutes. Garnish with mint
sprig before serving.
Georgia Summer Spritzer
6 fresh peaches, peeled, blanched and sliced
1 oz. water
2 oz. sugar
24 oz. dry white wine
12 oz. club soda
peach and lime slices for garnish
Combine water and sugar in small saucepan and boil lightly until sugar
dissolves. Let cool. Combine peaches and sugar syrup in blender. Blend until smooth.
Chill until needed.
Combine peach puree, wine and club soda in shaker or pitcher. Shake or stir
just enough to blend all ingredients. Pour into chilled cocktail glasses. Garnish with
peach slice and lime slice. Delicious, and very elegant.
Summer Punch
16 2­cup tea bags
3 qts. water
1 cup sugar
© Aliske Webb 1999. All rights reserved.
Published by Bookmice.com

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
1 can frozen lemonade concentrate
1 32 oz. bottle of ginger ale
Bring water to a boil and add tea bags. Remove from heat, cover and let stand
for 10 minutes. Discard teabags. Add sugar and lemonade, stirring until sugar
dissolves. Chill thoroughly. Stir in chilled ginger ale just before serving.
Banana Daiqairi
1 banada
1 oz. white rum
Dash banana liqueur
Splash each of pineapple juice, orange juice, lemon juice and lime juice
Dash white creme de cacao
crushed ice
grated nutmeg
Combine all ingredients except nutmeg and blend until smooth. Sprinkle with
nutmeg and serve.
© Aliske Webb 1999. All rights reserved.
Published by Bookmice.com

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
Bandits at Four O'Clock
One of the great things about Inn life is you get to rise early in the morning when
it's peaceful, cool and dark, to prepare breakfast for the guests. Great if your a robin,
not so great if you're an owl. And four o'clock is earlier than anyone who needs to get
up. That's the time when the banging and clattering started in the garden shed, behind
the "Summer kitchen."
The Summer kitchen is a later wood frame addition to the original stone house.
A Summer kitchen was used, as the name implies, during the Summer when it was hot,
so that the cooking stoves wouldn't heat up an otherwise cool house. It was also where
the women put up preserves and processed all the garden produce for the Winter. I
can't imagine how uncomfortable it must have been when they were cooking and
canning during the hot, hot days of Summer, before air conditioning or even electric
fans. The original small wood door has now been enlarged into an archway that
connects it directly to the main kitchen. The shed that is attached to the Summer
kitchen is accessible only from the outside, but the hollow wood walls boom loudly with
the echoes from the banging within.
Back in the city, night noises like this would have panicked me. But here I know
that whatever is making the noise is probably more afraid of me than I am of it.
Probably rightly so. Humankind has done more damage to nature than nature has ever
done to us. So, I pulled on a sweater and crept quietly to the kitchen and rummaged in
the "junk drawer" for a flashlight. The steps were cold and wet beneath my bare feet but
I never care about that when I'm hunting out my friends.
As I creaked open the shed door and shone the light around inside, scurried
rustlings behind the wheelbarrow revealed my quarry. A small pointy face stared back
at me. Then two, three, four more culprits popped into view. Caught red-handed, four
black-masked bandits were stuffing themselves with bird seed that Michael forgot to
store in a metal storage bin.
Momma raccoon had returned, with three babies this year. She's never quite
comfortable with humans, not like city park raccoons and I don't want to tame her.

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Aliske Webb
That's too dangerous for her and her babies. She's better off wild and fearful of
humans. Momma raccoon has only three legs. I often wonder what happened to her.
A fight with a farmyard dog maybe or caught in a trap, or whatever. She's a tough old
survivor.
I left the shed door open and backed off a dozen feet so that I could watch them.
That way, they would continue foraging in comfort.
After a few minutes, Momma ambled unconcerned out the door and the three
kits tumbled after her in a panic. She walked off thirty feet or so and sat down, and
looked back. All her babies were there behind her. She looked at me, stroked her
whiskers as if to say, "Thanks for the breakfast!" and then rubbed her ear in farewell.
Off they went back into the darkness.
Back in bed with my ice cold feet, Michael opened his eyes, looked at me and
shook his head smiling. He knows that from now on the bird seed will be stored away
properly and the shed door will be locked and that I'll leave out some scraps before we
go to bed. Maybe even some bacon from this morning's breakfast at the Inn.
Eggs Benedict
1 1/2 tbsp. butter
1 1/2 tbsp. all purpose flour
1 1/4 cups milk
3/4 tsp. dry mustard
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1/4 tsp. Tabasco sauce
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 English muffins, split
2 slices thick cut ham (back bacon or peameal bacon)
4 eggs
2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
To prepare sauce: melt butter in saucepan. Whisk in flour. Cook 2 to 3 minutes
on low heat, stirring but not browning. Whisk in milk. Bring to boil. Reduce heat.
Simmer for 5 minutes. Stir in mustard, Tabasco, lemon juice, cheese, and salt and

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Aliske Webb
pepper to taste.
Toast muffins. Butter lightly. Place on cookie sheet. Keep warm in oven. Warm
ham in oven.
Poach eggs. To serve, place slice of ham on each muffin, top with egg. Pour on
sauce. Sprinkle with parsley.
Apple French Toast with Cinnamon Sauce
4 eggs
1 cup milk
3 tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
8 slices day-old French bread, cut thick (French toast is better made with day-
old bread. It will soak up the egg more than fresh bread, and it will "puff up" more.)
3 tbsp. melted butter
Preheat oven to 375F.
To prepare toast: whisk eggs with milk, sugar, vanilla and cinnamon. Dip bread
into mixture, coating both sides, allowing bread to soak up mixture. Place bread in
single layer on baking sheets brushed with butter to prevent sticking. Bake for 12
minutes, turn bread over, bake another 12 minutes or until brown and puffy.
Sauce
2 tsp. butter
1/2 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup water
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
3 apples, peeled, cored, and sliced thinly
To prepare sauce: add butter and sugar in saucepan. Cook until melted. Add
water, cinnamon, and apples. Cook on low heat for 8 to 10 minutes, until tender.
To serve: arrange toast on plate, top with sauce.
Christmas Toast

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Aliske Webb
The use of nutmeg in this classic French toast recipe gives it a distinctive
Eggnog flavor. It's great any time of the year, but at Christmas, substitute Eggnog for
milk.
4 eggs
1 cup milk
3 tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
4 tsp. nutmeg
8 slices French bread, sliced thick
3 tbsp. melted butter
Preheat oven to 375F.
To prepare toast: whisk eggs with milk, sugar, vanilla, and nutmeg. Dip bread
into mixture, coating both sides, allowing bread to soak up mixture. Place bread in
single layer on baking sheets brushed with butter to prevent sticking. Bake for 12
minutes, turn, bake for 12 minutes or until brown and puffy.
Serve with icing sugar "snow" dusted over the toast, mint leaves, and a dollop
of red currant jam to resemble Christmas holly.
For a tasty alternative for the bread base, use croissants sliced in half, soaked
in egg mixture and baked.
Rice pudding is one of my all time favorite breakfasts and a great way to use
up leftover rice from last night's Chinese Food dinner. In fact, whenever I cook
steamed rice I always make twice what I need so I know I'll be able to make "rice
puddy" for breakfast.
"Leftover" Rice Pudding
2 cups cooked rice
1 cup milk
2 eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon

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Aliske Webb
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1 cup raisins
Preheat oven to 350F. Blend milk, sugar and egg together. Bring to a boil and
stir until mixture begins to thicken. Pour over rice in a casserole dish. Mix in raisins and
spices. Bake 40 to 50 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking or separating.
From Scratch, Creamy Rice is Nice Pudding
1/3 cup rice
4 cups milk
2 tsp. cornstarch
1/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 apples, peeled, cored and chopped
1/2 cup raisins
2 tbsp. butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 tbsp. cinnamon
Heat rice and milk in a saucepan until milk comes to a boil. Meanwhile, combine
cornstarch and sugar. Whisk in cream until mixture is smooth. Whisk into hot milk/rice
mixture. Reduce to low heat. Cover and cook 40 to 55 minutes or until rice is thick and
creamy, stirring occasionally.
While rice is cooking, combine apples, raisins, brown sugar, butter and half the
cinnamon in saucepan. Cook 20 to 30 minutes on low heat until apples are tender and
mixture thickens.
To serve: pour rice into large casserole or individual dishes. Top with apple
mixture. Sprinkle with remaining cinnamon. Serve warm or cold.
Corn bread is a dish that goes back to pioneer days when Native Americans
first taught the settlers how to prepare the dried cornmeal. This recipe goes equally
well with breakfast or as a dinner roll when made in individual muffin pans.

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Aliske Webb
Spicy Cornbread
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 cup yellow cornmeal
2 tbsp. sugar
4 tsp. baking powder
3/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. chili powder
1 1/4 cup milk
4 large eggs
6 tbsp. melter butter
2/3 cup fresh or frozen corn kernels
3 tbsp. chopped green onions
Preheat oven to 350F and grease square baking pan or muffin tins.
Stir together flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, salt and chili powder. Beat
milk, eggs and butter into flour mixture until just blended. Fold in corn and green onions.
Spoon batter into pan(s) and bake 40 to 50 minutes for one large pan or 20 to 25
minutes for individual muffins, or until center springs back when lightly pressed with
fork. Cool in pan before removing. Serve warm with any main dish or on their own.
The smell of cinnamon rolls baking for breakfast is sure to make even the
tardiest late sleepers rouse themselves.
Cinnamon Rolls
2 cups all purpose flour
2 tbsp. sugar
4 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
1/4 cup cold butter
1/2 cup milk
Preheat oven to 400F. Mix flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing
bowl. Cut butter into mixture with pastry blender or two kitchen knives or your fingertips
until mixture forms coarse crumbs. Gradually add milk to make a soft dough while

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
mixing with a fork. Turn onto floured surface, knead gently, then roll into a 12x8 inch
rectangle. Set aside.
2/3 cup soft butter
2 cups brown sugar, packed
2 tbsp. cinnamon
2/3 cup raisins
Cream together butter, sugar and cinnamon in mixing bowl. Drop spoonful of
butter mixture into each of 12 large greased muffin pans. Spread remaining mixture
over dough. Sprinkle on raisins. Roll up jelly-roll style. Cut into 12 equal slices. Place
each in muffin pan. Bake 20 minutes or until browned. Remove from pans immediately
to avoid sticking. Serve warm.
Because pancakes can be so-o-o-oo sweet, we like to serve them with
something to cut the sweetness, like spicy sausages or thick cut bacon.
Quilt Inn Pancakes
3 eggs
2 cups buttermilk
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. baking soda
1/4 cup butter
Beat eggs with buttermilk in mixing bowl. Combine flour, sugar and baking
powder. Stir together well. Mix dry ingredients into wet ingredients only until blended.
Melt butter in skillet and stir into batter. Return skillet to high heat. Spoon 1/4 cup
measures of batter into pan or onto griddle. Cook one side until small bubbles appear.
Flip and cook other side. Repeat until all batter is used.
Serve with real maple syrup. If you like a strong maple flavor, look for Vermont
or Canadian maple syrup which has a thicker consistency and stronger maple taste.
You will use less to achieve the same delicious taste, and save calories.

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Aliske Webb
Muffins are popular breakfast fare at all times of the year. They also make
great "pocket breakfasts" to take with you on an early morning walk. Here are some
of our favorites.
Extra Bran Muffins
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup all purpose flour
1/3 cup wheat bran
1/3 cup oat bran
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 tbsp. baking powder
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 egg
1 cup milk
1/3 cup melted butter
2 tbsp. molasses
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup sesame seeds
1 cup grated carrots
Preheat oven to 400F. Sift together flours, brans, sugar, baking powder and
cinnamon. Mix egg, milk, butter and molasses. Stir in raisins, seeds, and carrots. Fold
wet ingredients into dry ingredients until just blended. Do not overmix. Spoon mixture
into greased muffin pans or paper cups. Bake for 25 minutes. Cool before removing
from pan. Serve warm
Banana Bran Cran Muffins
1 egg
1 cup mashed banana
3/4 cup milk
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups 100% bran cereal

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Aliske Webb
2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 tbsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
3/4 cups whole berry cranberry sauce
Preheat oven to 400F and grease 12 large muffin pans. Combine egg, banana,
milk, brown sugar and oil. Stir in bran cereal and let stand 10 minutes. Mix remaining
ingredients, except cranberry sauce, until just moistened. Spoon half the batter into
muffin pans, top with cranberry sauce. Spoon remaining batter to cover cranberry
sauce. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until brown. Cool before removing from pan.
Halloween Muffins
4 cups all purpose flour
1 tbsp. baking powder
1 tbsp. cinnamon
2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. ginger
1 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/2 tsp. cloves
4 eggs
1 can pumpkin (14 oz.)
1 cup apple juice
3/4 cup melted butter
1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
1 1/2 cups chopped pecans
Preheat oven to 375F and grease 24 muffin pans. Stir together flour, baking
powder, cinnamon, baking soda, and spices. In separate bowl, beat eggs, and mix in
pumpkin, apple juice and butter. Blend in brown sugar. Blend wet ingredients into dry

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
ingredients until just moistened. Fold in half the pecans. Spoon into greased muffin
pans, sprinkle with remaining pecans. Bake 25 minutes or until firm to the touch. Cool
before removing from pan.
Cheesey Corn Muffins
These make a great luncheon roll served with soup.
1 2/3 cups all purpose flour
1 1/3 cups cornmeal
4 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1 can (14oz.) creamed corn
1/4 cup melted butter
1 1/2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
paprika to garnish
Preheat oven to 375F and grease 16 muffin pans. Stir together flour, cornmeal,
baking powder and soda, and salt. In separate bowl, beat eggs, blend in buttermilk,
creamed corn and butter. Blend wet ingredients into dry ingredients. Sprinkle with 1
cup cheese and mix until moistened. Spoon into greased muffin pans. Sprinkle with
remaining cheese. Dust with paprika. Bake for 25 minutes or until firm. Cool before
removing from pans.
High Fiber "Good For You" Muffins
2 cups all purpose flour
1 1/2 cups raisins
1 cup Muesli
1 cup natural bran
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 tsp. baking soda

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Aliske Webb
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup plain yogurt
1 cup milk
2/3 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup molasses
2 tbsp. rolled oats
Preheat oven to 400F and grease 16 muffin pans. Mix together flour, raisins,
Muesli, bran, sugar, soda, and salt. In separate bowl, blend yogurt, oil, milk and
molasses. Mix wet ingredients into dry until just moistened. Spoon batter into muffin
pans, or paper lined cups. Bake for 20 minutes or until firm to the touch. Cool before
removing from pans.
Zesty Orange Muffins
2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 cup sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/3 cup currants (or dried chopped apricots)
1 egg
1 cup plain yogurt
1/4 cup melted butter
2 tbsp. orange rind strips, chopped fine
1/4 cup orange juice
Preheat oven to 350F and grease muffin pans.
Stir together flour, baking powder and soda, and salt in large mixing bowl. Mix
in currants. In another beat eggs, blend in yogurt, butter, orange rind and juice. Stir into
flour mixture and blend only until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into muffin
pans. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until firm to touch.
Cheesecake Muffins

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Aliske Webb
Filling:
8 oz. package cream cheese, softened
2 tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. orange rind, grated fine
Cream cheese, sugar and orange rind together in bowl until smooth. Set aside.
Batter:
1 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/3 cup butter
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 eggs
2 tbsp. orange juice concentrate
1 tsp. orange rind, grated
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 1/4 cups finely grated carrots
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 tsp. cinnamon
Preheat oven to 350F. Cream butter and brown sugar together in mixing bowl.
Beat in eggs, orange juice concentrate and milk. Stir in orange rind, carrots, raisins
and walnuts. Combine flour, baking powder and cinnamon in large mixing bowl. Add
wet mixture. Stir just until moistened. Spoon 2 tablespoons batter into each muffin cup,
using only half the batter mix. Spoon one tablespoon filling on top. Cover with
remaining batter. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until top is firm and springs back when
pressed lightly.
A visitor from Louisiana, Bill Parker, brought us this recipe from his favorite
restaurant in New Orleans, where it's a popular dish with the locals.
Bread Pudding With Jack Daniel's Sauce
Pudding
3/4 cup sugar

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Aliske Webb
2 cups milk
2 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla
1/4 cup raisins
6 cups cubed French bread
In large bowl, whisk together sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla until fluffy. Stir in
raisins and bread. Let soak for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pack mixture lightly
into loaf pan. Place loaf pan in larger pan of hot water to prevent burning. Bake 1¼
hours or until lightly brown and set.
Jack Daniel's Sauce
1/4 lb. butter
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup 10% cream
1 egg
6 tbsp. Jack Daniel's Bourbon
Mix butter, sugar and cream in top of double boiler. Cook over simmering water
until sugar dissolves and mixture is hot. Whisk in egg and continue cooking until sauce
thickens slightly. Stir in Bourbon.
To serve, slice pudding, pour sauce over it and garnish with berries in season.

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
The Nose Remembers When
A warm spring day at the the Inn makes me restless. I've been storing energy
all Winter and need to get out and go somewhere. I start to think of foreign trips to
take. With all the Spring planting and general clean-up-after-winter work to be done that
isn't usually possible.
So instead, when I want a day off, I take my nose for a walk. I cut fresh grass,
toss hay in the barn, smell the freesias, dig in the newly-exposed moist earth, or rub my
face in the warm fur of a cat. Like a detective or a bloodhound on a hunt, I'm scenting
out smells to stimulate me because I know that every odor that comes accidentally or
intentionally to my nose will instantly whisk me away to times and places in memory
more quickly than a jet could carry me to an exotic locale. It's a vacation in recall that
I can return to and from without jetlag and come back refreshed every time.
It's no wonder our noses are right in the middle of our faces, up front and
sticking out where we can poke it into things. Neuroanatomists tell us that is it's a very
short distance from the receptor cells in the nose to the target cells in the brain, to those
bumpy brows and frontal lobes that we worked so hard through the millennia to
develop. By contrast, your fingers are a long way from your brain. If your nose was any
closer to the brain, it would be your brain. (And maybe in some ways it is.) The fact that
your nose has this enviable "local call" connection gives the environment an opportunity
to wage an upfront and personal attack on our brains, especially on our memories,
through our senses.
Smells evoke emotionally charged memories as pungently as an electrical
probe surgically applied directly to your grey cells would. (Don't try is at at home!) The
other senses are not so directly and uncompromisingly connected to the memory
banks. Pinch your arm and you're unlikely to immediately be transported to another
time and place where you experienced a similar pinching sensation. Look at water
cascading over rocks in a garden. Does it make you recall standing at the foot of a
waterfall in the forest? You may know the memory is there and with some mental effort,
connect the two but rarely does sight or touch trigger memory of such sensational, fully

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kinesthetic experiences. Television and the movies do everything they can to involve
us emotionally by capitalizing on every nuance of our sight and sound senses. They
even go so far as to wrap it around us like a cocoon in "virtual reality" games. If anyone
ever figures out a way to incorporate smell into the movie-going experience, (the way
cologne manufacturers have with magazine inserts), box office sales will go through the
roof. They will have our heartstrings.
We have inside us albums of memories just waiting to be opened by smell. The
fragrance of fresh cut grass can immediately flood your being with sensation
memories, of childhood, of Summer, the heat of sun, the cool of dew. You are
magically two feet shorter and engrossed in an inner world of olfactory holograms.
Another time, the ephemeral whiff of a familiar cologne instantaneously conjures up the
face of a long ago lover, the warmth of a body pressed against you in embrace, or the
quiet tranquility of langorous time alone. And on and on through the fragrant canyons
of our memories. Smell can trigger paroxisms of emotions, veritable avalanches of
emotion.
It's a good thing that our brains also easily habituate to smells. We consciously
smell something only when it is newly introduced. Within seconds the brain turns off its
sensitivity and we are no longer aware of it. Sit in a smoke-filled room, or beside with
a wet dog, or near food cooking. After a few minutes you won't be able to smell it. Go
outside and breathe different, new air. Return to the room and you will again sense the
"new" smell. It's a protective device our brains evolved to keep us from being
overloaded with information. Otherwise we would be walking zombies, adrift in
hallucinatory smell-induced reveries.
We also know that the sense of taste that we think is centered in our mouths
really only detects four qualities: sweet, sour, salty and bitter. The rest of our "taste" is
in our noses. It's the nose that has myriads of specialized receptors to detect the
crowded universe of compounds that make up the foods we eat. It's the nose that
saved our animal forebears (from being only three-bears) by differentiating what was
edible from what was poisonous. By the time it was in the mouth, it would have been
too late. Which explains why you can't taste Mom's chicken soup when you have a
head cold. The rhino-virus has knocked out the receptor cells.

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As people age they lose their memories. They also lose their sense of smell.
Maybe the memories went with the smell.
It's the nose that remembers when.
The best part of my day off nose-walk is returning to the aroma of Michael
cooking spring lamb and vegetables, or a fresh-baked rhubarb pie.
The Maxwell Q. Klinger Lamb and Pork Ecstasy
1 1/2 lbs. lean lamb stewing meat, in cubes
1 1/2 lbs. lean pork stewing meat, in cubes
3 stalks celery, chopped
3 carrots, chopped
1 onion, chopped
1/2 lb. baby carrots
1/2 lb. fresh broccoli
1/2 lb. baby onions
1/3 cup cognac
1 2/3 cups dry white wine
Chicken stock
1/2 tsp. ground mace
1/4 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
Mix cognac, wine, mace, cinnamon and 1/2 tsp. salt. Pour over meat cubes in
shallow bowl. Chill overnight, stirring occasionally. Drain meat. Reserve 3/4 cup
marinade.
Mix chopped celery, carrot and onions and layer in bottom of large Dutch oven
or ovenproof dish. Pour reserved marinade over top and simmer for 5 minutes. Layer
meat cubes and sprinkle with 2 tsp. salt. Cover and bake at 350F for 1 1/2 to 2 hours
or until meat is tender.
Steam baby carrots, broccoli and baby onions.

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To serve, remove meat with slotted spoon and transfer to shallow serving dish.
Arrange steamed vegetables around meat.
California Lamb Roast
1 lamb leg, boneless (about 4 pounds)
1/2 lb. dried apples
1/2 lb. dried apricots
1/2 cup golden raisins
1/2 cup Bourbon
1 tsp. ginger root, minced fine
1 tbsp. grated orange rind
Juice of 1 orange
3 cups apple cider
Place apples, apricots, raisins, ginger root, orange peel, orange juice and ½
cup Bourbon in medium saucepan. Add apple cider to cover fruit. Simmer uncovered
for 20 minutes. Cool.
Trim excess fat from lamb. Place in shallow casserole. Drain fruit. Add 1/2 cup
Bourbon to drained juice. Add enough apple cider to make 2 cups. Pour juice mixture
over roast. Chill overnight. Reserve drained fruits.
Remove roast from marinade. Salt lightly. Place 1/3 fruit on surface of meat. Roll
up and tie with strong string. Place in roasting pan. Roast uncovered at 325F for about
2 hours. Add remaining fruit to roasting pan during last half hour cooking.
To serve, remove roast and transfer to serving platter. Cover to keep warm. Let
stand 20 minutes before carving.
Remove fruit from roasting pan. Puree in blender with 2 tbsp. Bourbon and
enough apple cider to made pourable sauce. Heat thoroughly and serve with roast.
Lamb Curry
1 lb. boneless stewing lamb
1 onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced

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3 tbsp. olive oil
3 tsp. curry powder
1 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. ground ginger
1/4 tsp. chili powder
1/4 tsp. sugar
6 ounce can tomato paste
2 cups apples, peeled and chopped
Cut lamb into 1­inch cubes. Saute onion and garlic in olive oil in deep skillet or
Dutch oven until golden. Add curry powder, paprika, ginger, chili powder and sugar.
Blend well. Add lamb and brown on all sides. Add tomato paste and enough boiling
water to cover. Stir well. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes over low heat. Add apples.
Cook another 15 minutes or until meat is tender. Serve with fragrant rice.
Garlic Lovers' Lamb Kabobs
1 1/2 lbs. boneless lamb, cut into 1½ inch cubes
1 cup dry white wine or apple juice
2 tbsp. olive oil
1/4 cup soy sauce
10 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp. dried rosemary, crushed
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Train fat from lamb and cube. Combine remaining ingredients in shallow dish.
Add meat and stir, coating well. Cover and chill overnight. Remove meat from
marinade and thread onto skewers (alternating with vegetables such as large
mushrooms, cherry tomatoes, sweet peppers, etc. if desired). Grill for 8 to 10 minutes,
turning often and basting with remaining marinade.
Stir-Fry Lamb and Asparagus
1 lb. boneless leg of lamb
1 lb. fresh asparagus

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1 onion, sliced
1/4 lb. mushrooms, sliced
1 sweet red pepper, seeded and chopped coarsely
1­inch piece ginger root, sliced thin
1 clove garlic
2 tbsp. soy sauce
1 tbsp. dry sherry
1 tbsp. honey
2 tsp. cornstarch
1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper
4 tbsp. vegetable oil
Trim fat from lamb. Cut into 1/4­inch thick slices; cut slices to 2­inch strips. Trim
ends of asparagus and chop into 2­inch pieces. Combine soy sauce, sherry, honey,
cornstarch and pepper in small bowl. Set aside.
In large deep skillet or wok, heat 1 tablespoon oil over high heat. Add ginger
and stir­fry until crispy. Remove and set aside. Add half the lamb and brown on both
sides. Remove and set aside. Add another tablespoon oil and brown remaining lamb.
Remove and set aside.
Reduce heat to medium. Add remaining oil to pan. Add asparagus,
mushrooms, onion and garlic. Cook 1 minute. Add peppers. Cook 2 more minutes. Stir
soy mixture and pour into mushrooms and peppers. Cook until thickened. Return lamb
and ginger to skillet. Stir­fry until heated through (about 1 minute). Serve immediately
over rice.
Rootin' for Rhubarb Pie
9­inch unbaked pie shell
3 cups rhubard, cut into 1/2­inch pieces
boiling water
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 tbsp. flour
salt to taste

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1/4 tsp. cinnamon
1 tbsp. melted butter
3 egg yolks, beaten
Preheat oven to 425F. Pour boiling water over rhubarb to cover, let stand 5
minutes. Drain. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and cinnamon. Add melted butter and
beaten egg yolks. add rhubarb to sugar mixture and combine thoroughly. Spread fruit
mixtire in oie shell. Bake 10 minutes in hot oven. reduce temperature to 350F and
bake 30 minutes. Remove from oven. Cover cooled pie with meringue (recipe follows)
and return to 350F oven. Bake 10 minutes.
Marvelous Meringue
3 egg whites
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
6 tbsp. sugar
Bat egg whites and cream of tartar until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in
sugar, continuing to beat until stiff peaks form.
Rhubarb Radio Pudding
Pudding
1 cup all purpose flour
1/3 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups diced rhubarb
1/4 cup raisins
1/2 cup milk
1 egg
1/2 tsp. vanilla
Sauce
1 cup boiling water

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1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup butter
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1 tsp. grated lemon rind
pinch nutmeg
To make pudding, in bowl mix together flour, sugar, baking powder, baking
soda, and salt. Stir in rhubarb and raisins. In separate bowl, beat together milk, egg
and vanilla just enough to combine, stir into flour mixture. Turn batter into greased
square baking dish.
To make sauce, into boiling water stir in sugar abd butter until sugar dissolves
and butter melts. Add lemon juice, rind and nutmeg. Pour gently over batter. Bake in
350F oven for 30 minutes or until pudding is golden brown on top and firm to the touch.
Rah! Rah! Rhubarb Crisp
4 cups coarsely chopped rhubarb
1 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup strawberry jam
1 1/2 cups granola
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ground ginger
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup pecans, chopped
1/2 cup butter, softened
In bowl, combine rhubarb, 1/4 cup flour and sugar. Stir in jam, set aside.
In separate bowl, combine remaining flour, granola, cinnamon and ginger. Stir
in brown sugar and pecans. Blend in butter until crumbly. Press 2 cups of the granola
mixture into the bottom of a square baking dish. Spoon rhubarb mixture over top, cover
with remaining granola mixture. Bake in 375F oven for 45 minutes or until deep golden
brown and filling is tender.

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Adam's Search for the Ultimate Rib
We have traveled all across North America, searching for the ultimate rib.
Surprisingly, there are many others who have also embarked on this culinary quest. In
fact, if you mention to someone that you are a "rib freak", they are just as likely to tell
you about their favorite restaurant, recipe, or sauce. We even have a friend, Gerry, who
collects jars of sauces. Some people have wine cellars, but there's our Ger, down in
his basement late at night, applying a quarter turn to each dusty bottle, to keep the lid
wet, naturally.
Ribs differ wherever you go. Some people prefer pork ribs, the side variety for
thinness, baby backs for meaty, sweet flavor, country style for thick pleasure, or sweet
and sour cuts. Others swear by beef ribs, from the full bone of the standing rib roast to
the short rib type.
And then there's the sauce. Ah, sauce! Ketchup-based, mustard-enhanced,
garlicked, honeyed, hickory-smoked, hot, medium, sweet, or even no sauce at all. The
varieties are as endless as the rib aficionados who swear by them.
Many of the commercially prepared sauces rely on an ingredient called "liquid
smoke" to give a hickory flavor to the sauce. Liquid smoke was first commercially
prepared in Nebraska in 1895, originally from the tar of burned wood that was
dissolved in water (boy, does that ever sound good!). Nowadays, it is synthetically
produced and the unhealthy tars and resins have been removed. Because it is
concentrated, a very small amount of this ingredient goes a long, long way and can
easily overpower more subtle flavors. For some, hickory smoke is an acquired taste
and should never stand in the way of enjoying ribs, your way.
And so once committed to the rib quest, one needs to search out, in every
eating establishment, the "rib dinners" on the menu. However, for the true and
venturesome, connoisseur, it's simply a matter of saying, "I'll have the ribs, please."
We have eaten ribs in franchise-type restaurants, in smoky beer joints, in
specialty places where the ribs are smoked in a pit, or baked in a brick oven for up to
24 hours. Naturally we think those at the Quilt Inn are the best. But the joy of the quest

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is that it is never-ending. Oh, rapture!
The best rib story I can think of, I owe to Alan Alda in his role as "Hawkeye
Pierce" on the long-running television series, M*A*S*H. During this memorable
episode, Hawkeye has had two weeks of liver and fish, and he's had enough. As he
says, "I've eaten a river of liver and an ocean of fish, and I won't take it any longer!"
What's the answer? "Ribs," he says to his partner in crime, Trapper John McIntyre. "But
not just any ribs. They have to be `Adam's Ribs'. With sauce. And coleslaw. From
Chicago!" Their bounty is shipped all the way to Korea marked "medical supplies", and
after a number of comic mishaps, finally arrive. Was it worth it? Any rib-lover watching
the episode would say, "Yes!" We couldn't understand why anyone would think it an
unreasonable request, or quest, at all. The search for the ultimate rib goes on. It knows
no boundaries.
There are as many ways to cook ribs at home as there are sauces to cook them
in: boil to tenderize, marinate or not, bake, broil, barbecue. I think we've tried them all
and here are the best of the ones we like to prepare.
Hot Dijon Ribs
4 lbs. pork spareribs
1 cup liquid honey
3/4 cup Dijon mustard
2 tbsp. Tabasco sauce
1 tbsp. soy sauce
2 tsp. onion powder
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
Cut ribs into serving-size pieces. Place in large saucepan, cover with water.
Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 hour or until meat is tender. Drain
ribs. Set aside.
Sauce
Combine all ingredients. Broil or barbecue ribs for 10 minutes, until brown.
Baste with sauce on both sides. Cook another 5 minutes per side. Serve with baked
beans, coleslaw, and plenty of napkins.

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Michael's Baked Beans
These are traditional in many parts of the country, as the delightful
accompaniment for ribs. How are they prepared?
1 large can of commercial baked beans (make it easy on yourself!)
1 tbsp. dry mustard
1 handful brown sugar
3 glugs maple syrup
Mix. Heat. Eat.
Honey Garlic Baked Ribs
6 lbs. back or side ribs
3 tbsp. garlic powder
3 tsp. fresh ground pepper
3 tsp. oregano
1 tsp. thyme
salt to taste
Place ribs in large pot. Cover with water and add other ingredients. Bring to
boil. Simmer 10 minutes.
Remove from heat and let cool for 1 hour in liquid.
Sauce:
2 cups liquid honey
2 tbsp. molasses
1/2 cup Chinese plum sauce
1/2 cup steak sauce
3 tbsp. white wine
2 tbsp. garlic powder
2 tsp. dry mustard
2 tbsp. fresh ground pepper
2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 tbsp. white vinegar
2 tbsp. soy sauce

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Preheat oven to 400F. Mix all sauce ingredients together well. Remove ribs
from liquid and place on broiler rack. Brush with sauce and bake until browned on both
sides, about 15 minutes. Serve with remaining sauce.
Sweet and Sour Broiled Spareribs
4 lbs. lean spareribs
2 onions, chopped
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup vinegar
1 tbsp. soy sauce
1/2 cup pineapple juice
1/3 cup water
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1 tbsp. cornstarch
Place ribs on broiler pan. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Broil until deep brown
on both sides.
Saute onions in deep pot until softened. Add all other ingredients, except
cornstarch. Add ribs. Cover pot and simmer for 2 hours. Remove ribs. Make paste with
cornstarch and spoonful of water. Thicken sauce with cornstarch paste. Return ribs to
sauce. Transfer to serving dish and serve with Petit Sirah wine.
Very Merry Baked Ribs
5 lbs. pork ribs
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
1 cup sweet red Vermouth
Preheat oven to 350F. Rub salt and pepper into ribs and place in baking pan.
Cover loosely with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Turn and bake another 30 minutes.
Pour Vermouth over ribs, and bake uncovered for another hour, basting every
15 minutes.

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Beer and Honey Marinated Ribs
8 lbs. spareribs
3 cups beer
1 cup honey
2 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tsp. chili powder
2 tsp. sage
1 1/2 tsp. dry mustard
1/2 tsp. salt
Place ribs in large pan. Mix all other ingredients and pour over ribs. Let stand
overnight in refrigerator, turning occasionally. Remove ribs from marinade, reserving
liquid.
Broil or barbecue ribs on mediumlow heat for 1 hour, brushing with marinade.
Or, bake in 350F oven for 1 1/2 hours.
We happened to be in Washington, D.C., on a business trip, and you would
have thought with all the five-star restaurants in the area, the culinary world would
have been at out feet. Well, not for us. We had to travel 50 miles to a place we had
heard of called Dirty Pete's Ribs, serving on weekends only. Neither Pete nor his
daughter-in-law Carole would reveal the secrets of his sauce, but both agreed that
what was required was slo-o-o-o-w cooking. I think the secret to Pete's sauce was Jack
Daniel's (whether it was in Pete or the sauce, I'm not too sure). Perhaps you'll have
the opportunity to visit. If so, say "Hi" from us, and set a spell at the picnic tables in
the back.
Hickory Smoked Barbecue Ribs
2 slabs baby back ribs, or spareribs
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 cup hickory wood chips

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barbecue sauce
Preheat oven to 400F. Rub cinnamon, cloves and pepper into both sides of ribs.
Place ribs on wire rack on baking pan. Bake for 3 hours, until tender.
Wrap hickory wood chips in aluminum foil, pierce foil to allow smoke to escape,
and place directly in the center of hot barbecue coals.
Baste ribs and place on grill above wood chips. Cover grill and cook for 10
minutes. Turn ribs, baste again and cook another 10 minutes or until ribs are browned
but still moist. Serve with a hearty Beaujolais wine.
Not Pete's Barbecue Sauce:
2­15 oz. cans tomato sauce
1/2 cup molasses
10 cloves garlic
2 tbsp. ground cumin
2 tbsp. dry mustard
fresh ground pepper
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. anise seed
1/4 tsp. hot pepper flakes
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
Combine all ingredients except vinegar in saucepan. Simmer, covered, on low
heat for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Ad vinegar to taste and simmer for another 15
minutes. Chill at least 24 hours, or until ready to use.
Grown-Up Ribs
4 to 5 lbs. meaty pork ribs
Sauce
1 onion, chopped
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tomato, seeded and chopped
1/2 sweet red pepper, chopped

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1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/2 tsp. paprika
1/4 tsp. turmeric
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup beer (for Young `Uns Ribs, substitute Coke or Dr Pepper)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp. Tabasco
Combine all ingredients in blender and process until smooth. Place ribs in deep
dish and pour sauce over ribs. Marinate for 3 hours.
Preheat grill. Transfer ribs to 2 sheets of heavy duty aluminum foil. Fold up
edges, pour 1/2 cup marinade over ribs. Seal foil edges together. Place foil-wrapped
ribs on grill, cover and cook 2 hours.
10 minutes before serving, remove ribs from foil and grill over medium heat for
5 minutes per side, basting with sauce.
And while you have the barbecue grill on, you might as well cook some
vegetables too. For each person, chop one potato and a half and onion into chunks.
Place on one foot square of heavy duty aluminum foil, sprinkle with your favorite
savory spice mix, or simply grind fresh pepper over the vegetables. Add a dollop of
butter, or margarine. Fold over the foil, sealing the ends, and place on cooler part of
grill. Cook for 20 minutes, turning frequently to prevent burning. Serve with lots of
napkins. Try this with fresh asparagus, or any other combination of "solid"
vegetables.
Creole Ribs
2 lbs. pork spareribs
1 onion, chopped
1 green pepper, seeded and chopped

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1/2 cup green onion, chopped
1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
2 cups rice, uncooked
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/4 cup vegetable oil (We know that vegetable oil comes from vegetables and
olive oil from olives. So where does baby oil come from?)
Brown ribs in oil in large deep skillet. Remove and drain well on paper towels.
Reserve drippings in pan and saute onion, green pepper and green onion for 2
minutes. Return ribs to pan. Add remaining ingredients and water to cover. Cover and
simmer for 1 hour or until ribs are tender and rice is cooked. Try these with a light
Gewurtraminer wine.
Mediterranean Short Ribs
6 lbs. beef shortribs
1/4 cup olive oil
1 large can plum tomatoes, drained and chopped
1 onion, sliced
1/2 cup dry red wine
1/2 cup beef stock
6 cloves garlic, minced
4 tsp. fresh parsley, chopped
2 tsp. fresh rosemary, chopped
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Preheat oven to 350F. Mix tomatoes, stock, garlic, parsley, rosemary and
cinnamon together in a bowl. Set aside.
Brown short ribs in olive oil over medium heat. Place in roasting pan and
sprinkle with pepper. Saute onion in shortrib browning until tender. Add to shortribs.
Add wine to skillet and bring to a boil, deglazing pan. Add liquid browning to shortribs.
Pour tomato mixture over shortribs and mix well. Cover and bake for 2 1/2
hours. Uncover pan and cook another 20 minutes to reduce liquid. Skim off any

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grease. Serve with wild rice side dish.
For something completely different, try...
Stuffed Ribs
2 full racks of ribs
Stuffing
1 onion, chopped
1/4 cup celery, chopped
2 tbsp. butter
1 cup cooked mashed potatoes
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 egg, beaten
1/4 tsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 tsp. marjoram
1/4 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
Saute onion and celery in butter until tender. Stir in potatoes, bread crumbs,
egg, parsley, marjoram, salt and pepper. Mix well.
Place rack of ribs on greased shallow roasting pan. Spoon stuffing on one rack
of ribs. Cover with remaining rack. Tie or secure with string. Rub ribs with fresh ground
pepper and sage.
Bake at 475F, uncovered, for 20 minutes. Reduce heat to 325F, cover. Bake
for 1 hour or until tender. Cut between rib sections for individual servings and serve
with Beaujolais wine.
Another Stuffing:
1 cup bread crumbs
1/2 cup onion, chopped fine
1 cup apples, chopped fine
1 tbsp. brown sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper

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Combine all ingredients and use as above.
Everyone, and every region, has their own distinctive and unique barbecue
sauce recipe. It's great to have a specialty, but we like to prepare different sauces at
different times, just to keep the guests interested, trying to identify, "What IS that
ingredient I can taste?" Here are some of our favorites.
Southern Style Barbecue Sauce
1 cup peach preserves
1 onion, chopped fine
1 tbsp. tomato sauce
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1 tsp. paprika
2 tsp. dry mustard
1/4 tsp. Tabasco sauce
2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat. Simmer
uncovered for 10 minutes. Chill until ready to use.
Racetrack Barbecue Sauce
Serve on Derby Day with Mint Juleps
1 onion, chopped
1 cup ketchup
1/2 cup vinegar
1 cup water
1 tbsp. horseradish
1 tbsp. prepared mustard
1 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1 tbsp. brown sugar
1 tsp. fresh ground pepper

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Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil while stirring well.
Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Chill until
ready to use.
Molasses Sauce:
1/2 cup molasses
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup onion, finely chopped
1/2 cup mustard
juice of 2 lemons
zest of 2 lemons
1 tsp. Tabasco sauce
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and
simmer for 10 minutes. Refrigerate until ready to use.
To the Manor Born Barbecue Sauce
1/2 cup Sherry
1/4 cup ketchup
1 tbsp. brown sugar
1 tbsp. white wine vinegar
1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/3 tsp. chili pepper
Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer
for 5 minutes. Refrigerate until ready to use.
Yuppie Barbecue Sauce
1/2 cup dried apricots

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water to cover
1 green onion, chopped
3 tbsp. vegetable oil
1/2 cup raspberry vinegar
1/4 cup liquid honey
1 tsp. soy sauce
1/4 cup tomato sauce
1/2 tsp. oregano
1/4 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
Cover apricots with water in saucepan. Bring to boil, reduce heat. Simmer until
tender, approximately 1/2 hour. Cool.
Place apricots and 1/2 cup of the liquid in a blender. Process until smooth. Add
other ingredients and pour into saucepan. Bring to boil, reduce heat. Simmer 5
minutes. Chill until ready to use.
Oriental Baked Ribs
2 racks of spareribs
4 cloves garlic, minced
4 tbsp. ketchup
4 tbsp. soy sauce
4 tbsp. hoisin sauce
4 tbsp. dry Sherry
2 tbsp. fresh ginger, grated
2 tbsp. honey
Preheat oven to 300F and cut ribs into individual serving pieces and arrange
in shallow baking pan. Bake for 45 minutes.
Combine remaining ingredients and brush spareribs lightly. Bake additional 30
minutes and turn. Brush with more sauce and bake another 30 minutes or until nicely
browned.

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Some people like to marinate their ribs overnight first to tenderize and
flavorize them before grilling. The marinade is then used to baste the ribs during
cooking.
Ginger Marinade
2 green onions, chopped
2 tbsp. sesame seed, toasted
6 tbsp. soy sauce
6 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp. fresh ginger root, grated
2 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. peanut oil
Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Pour over ribs.
Tandoori Marinade
1/2 cup plain yogurt
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tsp. fresh ginger root, grated
2 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. lime juice
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cumin seeds
1/2 tsp. ground coriander
1/4 tsp. turmeric
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
pinch of cloves
Pour lemon and lime juice over ribs, coating well. Combine all other ingredients
in blender and process until smooth. Pour over ribs and let stand for four hours.

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California Marinade
1 cup orange juice
1/4 cup liquid honey
1/4 cup vinegar
2 tsp. zest of orange
Combine all ingredients is a bowl, and brush over ribs, coating thoroughly.
Tex Mex Marinade
2 cups Bloody Mary mix
juice of 1 lemon
2 tbsp. horseradish
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
5 tbsp. mild chilies, chopped fine
1 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Combine all ingredients in a bowl and pour over ribs.
Lemon Baster
1/2 cup lemon juice
1 cup olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 tsp. oregano, crushed
1 tsp. lemon zest, grated
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Combine all ingredients in a bowl and baste ribs while cooking.
And, when you can't think of anything else to do with ribs, you can always
make soup.
Shortrib Soup
4 lbs beef shortribs, cut in chunks
1 onion, sliced

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4 cups beef stock
3 celery stalks, chopped
3 carrots, chopped
1 leek, chopped
1 cup mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp. parsley, chopped
1 tbsp. fresh dill, chopped
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Place ribs and onions in soup pot. Add stock to cover and bring to a boil.
Reduce heat and cover. Simmer for 2 hours or until tender, skimming off fat
occasionally.
Remove ribs and remove meat from bones, discard bones. Set meat aside.
Chill broth until fat rises to surface and skim off. Strain broth, if desired, and return to
pot. Return to heat. Add celery, carrots, mushrooms and leeks. Cook for 2 minutes.
Add meat. Stir in parsley, dill, salt and pepper. Heat thoroughly and serve with a full-
bodied Chardonnay wine.

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Sittin' Loose
Edna Mae, one of my Grama's oldest friends, worked hard on a farm all day,
and in the evening you could find her flopped in a comfortable old rocking chair on the
front porch. Her favorite expression for her feeling at that time of day was, "When ah
sits, ah sits loose!" Now there's a country Inn attitude for you--learn to sit loose.
The important thing about a country Inn is to have lots of favorite places to sit.
Each one needs to be different and inviting yet has to make the sitter feel that they are
the first to have found this particular spot, with this special outview of the world or that
unusual insight into life. If you need lessons on favorite spots around the Inn, find one
of the Inn cats. They know the best places and they usually don't mind a little, if quiet,
company. We have several cats and lots of places.
You need to find, however, the cat whose personality matches your sittin' mood.
Now Nine Patch, for example, our long hair calico cat, is built for comfort not speed.
Michael says that from behind she looks like a hairy bowling ball with a tail. A true
"Garfield" of cats, you see her ambling slowly around the place, examining every blade
of grass like a reincarnated Sixties hippie on bad drugs and blinking sleepily through
half-open eyes. Nine Patch looks for comfort and she usually dozes on a cosy quilt-
covered chair on the porch out of the wind, in a sunny window seat or behind the
orchard wall on a warm stone slab. Her places are warm and cosy and sleep-inducing.
If you're in a mellow mood, follow Nine Patch and take a book but only if you don't
intend to read it.
Dixie, on the other hand, is a gadabout cat. A fluffy brainless grey and white
furball, she's the kind of a cat that starts to purr as soon as she enters the room as if
announcing, "OK, everyone, I'm here and I'm looking for love!" She purrs if you just look
at her from across the room. Dixie pays no particular mind to comfort. She'll sleep
anywhere, anytime, no matter how lumpy it is so long as there are people about or the
potential of people about. Quite foolishly, she'll sleep in doorways, busy doorways at
that, waiting to make sure she's there to catch any tidbitd of conversation or food, and
often getting stepped on. Follow her to the places where people gather to chat: the

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main room by the fireplace, the stone patio, around the kitchen table. Don't be
surprised if she follows you to your room at night for some bedside conversation.
Then there's little Hobbes. A small, sleek, short haired cat with grey stripy
pyjamas. She's a little skittish, shy and hard to find. Her places are quiet unobtrusive
spots to sit and watch the world, without being seen watching. They're philosophical,
often elevated and hard to reach places. Least visited, most treasured. The loft in the
barn by the window overlooking the courtyard, top of the bookshelf, behind the lattice
under the porch. Awkward, I agree. You may have to find your own Hobbes-like places
where you can be alert, watchful, and contemplative. Or, Like Edna Mae, you can just
"sit loose" in a wicker or rocking chair on the long porch that runs across the front of the
Inn.
Picnic fare goes well with good sittin' places. At the Quilt Inn, many guests like
to go off by themselves and enjoy space, quiet contemplation, and alfresco dining. We
pack picnic lunches. Tuna fish for Nine Patch, Dixie and Hobbes is optional. Grab a
cat and go!
Speaking of cats, commedienne Gracie Allen was once asked by a fellow cat-
lover, "How do you raise your cats?"
Gracie shrugged, "Two hands under the belly, and lift!"
Angela's Summer Seafood Salad
1/2 lb. shrimp, shelled and deveined (Angela, one of our cooks, is obsessive
about deveining and cleaning shrimp. The "vein" is actually the shrimp's intestine).
1/2 lb. scallops, halved
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 onion, chopped fine
2 cups long grain rice
3 cups chicken stock
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1 cup roasted red peppers, chopped fine
4 green onions, chopped fine

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1 1/2 cups green peas
Heat oil for 1 minute in saucepan. Add onion and saute for 2 minutes or until
slightly soft. Stir in shrimps, rice, add stock, salt and pepper. Bring to boil. Reduce
heat, simmer covered for 10 minutes. Stir in roasted red peppers, green onions and
peas. Cover, cook for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 5
minutes.
Dressing
1/4 cup olive oil
3 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
1/4 cup fresh dill, chopped
1 tsp. Dijon mustard
Whisk lemon juice with vinegar and mustard until smooth. Add oil while whisking
vigorously. Stir in dill. Transfer shrimp and scallop mixture to large bowl. Pour dressing
over, toss well. Chill and serve. Garnish with slices of Spanish or Vidalia onions. Serve
with a chilled Chenin Blanc wine.
Pocket Pita Pooches
6 small pita bread
2 cups cold meat, ham or corned beef
1 cup sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
1/2 cup green onion, chopped fine
4 tbsp. mayonnaise
1/2 cup chili sauce
Preheat oven to 450F or heat barbecue to medium. Mix together meat, cheese,
eggs and onions. Stir in mayonnaise and chili sauce. Cut off top edge of pita and open
by sliding knife between the two layers of bread. Spoon mixture into pitas. Wrap
loosely in foil and bake for 15 minutes. Serve with raw carrots sticks.
Pocket Re-Pita Pooches Encore

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6 pita bread
1 ripe avocado
2 ripe tomatoes
6 strips bacon, cooked crisp
bean sprouts
mayonnaise
Cut off top edge of pita bread, open with knife between the two layers of bread.
Dice tomato and avocado, crumble bacon, mix together with bean sprouts. Add
enough mayonnaise to moisten. Spoon mixture into pita, wrap in foil. Pack in picnic
hamper with crisp apples.
Classic Caesar Salad
1 head Romaine lettuce
4 slices bacon, cooked crisp and diced
1 cup croutons
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
Dressing
1/3 cup olive oil
1/3 cup red wine vinegar
1 tsp. anchovy paste
1/4 tsp. Tabasco sauce
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp. dry mustard
3 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tbsp. flour
2 cups milk
2 egg yolks
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Combine mustard, flour, salt and pepper in top of double boiler. Stir in milk.
Beat in egg yolks. Simmer over gently boiling water until mixture thickens. Remove
from heat. Stir in Worcestershire, Tabasco, garlic, anchovy paste, vinegar and oil. Mix

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well. Chill until ready to serve.
Wash and dry lettuce. Break into pieces. Toss with dressing to coat leaves.
Sprinkle with bacon and croutons and cheese. Toss lightly again. Serve with red
Zinfandel wine.
Curried Salad
6 cups mixed garden vegetables (try celery slices, carrot strips, cauliflower,
green and red peppers, turnip strips).
Steam vegetables for 5 minutes. Drain and cool.
Dressing:
1/2 cup white vinegar
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup salad oil
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
2 tsp. curry powder
Mix all ingredients well and pour over vegetables. Let chill overnight in
refrigerator.
Rice Salad
3 cups cold cooked rice
1/2 cup cooked peas
1/2 cup cooked corn
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup red and green pepper, chopped
1/3 cup olive oil
6 slices bacon, cooked crisp and crumbled
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Toss with olive oil and chill overnight in
refrigerator before serving. Garnish with orange sections.

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If you like to plan your meals in advance, this is a good dish to plan for a
picnic the day after you serve fresh cooked corn, peas or rice for dinner.
Chicken Salad
3 lbs. boneless chicken, cut in cubes
1 1/2 cups pecan halves
1 cup celery, diced
1 1/2 cup sour cream (why does a container of sour cream have an expiry
date?)
1 1/2 cup mayonnaise
3 cups water
1 chicken bouillon cube
1 lb. seedless green grapes
1 tsp. fresh dill
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 350F and place chicken in shallow pan. Bring water to a boil,
add bouillon cube. Bring to boil. Pour over chicken to cover. Cover and bake 30
minutes or until cooked thoroughly. Chill in liquid, then drain and discard liquid.
Shred chicken into pieces in large bowl. Add grapes, pecans, celery and dill.
Toss well. Mix sour cream and mayonnaise in mixing bowl. Toss with chicken mixture.
Season to taste. Cover and chill before serving. Serve on a bed of lettuce, garnish with
cherry tomatoes cut in half. Serve with white Vouvray wine.
Northern California Salad
1 head Romaine lettuce
alfalfa sprouts
1 orange, peeled and sectioned
4 green onions, chopped
1/2 green olives with pimiento, sliced
2 cups cauliflower florets
Dressing
1/2 cup olive oil

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1/2 cup wine vinegar
zest of 1 orange
1/4 cup orange juice
1 tsp. fresh basil
1 tsp. fresh ground pepper
salt
Combine all ingredients and blend well. Pour over cauliflower, onions, and
olives and marinate 4 hours. Before serving, toss with lettuce, sprouts and orange
sections. Serve with white Zinfandel wine.
Southern California Salad
1/2 head Romaine lettuce
1/2 head Iceberg lettuce
1/2 lb. spinach
1 tin Mandarin oranges, drained
1/2 cup toasted almond slivers
Wash and dry lettuce. Drain oranges. Toast almonds. Mix in bowl and set aside.
Dressing
1/2 cup salad oil
1/4 cup wine vinegar
1/4 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
dash of Tabasco sauce
1 tbsp. parsley
Combine all ingredients and blend well. Chill until serving. Just before serving
toss greens, oranges and almonds with dressing. Serve with chilled white Zinfandel
wine.
Practically Perfect Potato Salad
6 to 10 potatoes, boiled, cooled and cut in chunks
3 hard boiled eggs, chopped

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1/2 lb. salami, ham, or other favorite deli meat, cut in chunks
3 dill pickles, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 apples, cored and chopped
3 tbsp. mayonnaise
3 tbsp. red wine vinegar
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
paprika
Mix potatoes, pickles, eggs, apple and onion in a large bowl. Fry salami lightly
and drain off excess fat, cool. Stir salami, mayonnaise and seasoning into potato
mixture. Chill for 2 hours before serving. Garnish with slivered red and green sweet
peppers. Serve with a robust Bordeaux wine.
Lo-Cal Potato Salad
3 lbs. red potatoes
4 green onions, sliced thin
1 red onion, sliced thin
1/2 cup black olives, drained
salt and pepper to taste
Scrub potatoes, cut into chunks, cook until tender. Drain well. Combine with
green onions, red onions and olives. Set aside.
Dressing
2 cups milk
3 egg yolks
3 tbsp. vinegar
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. dry mustard
2 tbsp. brown sugar
3 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. all purpose flour
1 tsp. horseradish

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1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
pinch cayenne pepper
Combine salt, mustard, sugar, flour and cayenne in top of double boiler. Add
milk and egg yolk. Stir until smooth. Cook over boiling water, or medium heat, until
thickened. Stir in butter and vinegar. Chill. Stir horseradish and mustard into dressing.
Season to taste. Toss over potato mixture, coating thoroughly. Serve chilled. Garnish
with cucumber slices.
Asparagus Salad
1 lb. asparagus, steamed until tender, chilled
1 head lettuce, broken in pieces
2 pimientos, diced
1 green onion, chopped
1/4 cup sesame seeds, toasted
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/4 tsp. Italian herb seasoning
2 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. salad oil
Combine asparagus, lettuce, pimientos, onion ande sesame seeds in salad
bowl. Combine pepper, seasoning, lemon juice and oil in shaker and mix well. Toss
with greens. Serve immediately.
Crab Salad
1 head Boston lettuce
1 lb. fresh crabmeat
juice of 1/2 lemon
zest of 1/2 lemon
2 stalks celery, diced fine
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tbsp. fresh chives, chopped
lemon wedges for garnish

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Gently mix together crabmeat, lemon juice and zest, celery, mayonnaise and
chives. Make a bed of lettuce leaves on 4 individual plates. Spoon crab mixture onto
lettuce. Garnish with lemon wedges. Serve with chilled white Zinfandel wine.
Memories of Tuscany Salad
2 cups spiral pasta, cooked
1/2 cup salami, julienne cut
1/2 cup pepperoni, cut in small cubes
1 cup cucumber, chopped coarsely
3/4 cup green pepper, chopped coarsely
1/3 cup red onion, sliced thin
2 ripe tomatoes, chopped
1/2 cup Provolone cheese, cubed
1/3 cup black or green olives, sliced
1 tsp. fresh parsely, chopped
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Combine all ingredients and chill. When ready to serve, toss with Italian-style
salad dressing.
Crazy Quilt Fruit Salad
4 seedless oranges, sectioned
1/2 fresh pineapple, diced
2 sweet apples, cored and diced
1 banana, sliced
1 Kiwi fruit, sliced
1 cup fresh strawberries, halved
1/2 pint whipping cream
1 oz. Cointreau or Grand Marnier
1/2 pint mayonnaise
1 head Boston lettuce
Gently mix all fruit together. Whip cream. Mix liqueur into mayonnaise and then

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gently fold into whipped cream. Add cream mixture to fruit.
Arrange lettuce on 4 individual salad plates. Spoon fruit onto lettuce and serve.
Sunny Afternoon Salad
4 sweet red grapefruit
3 medium avocado
8 cups mixed lettuce greens, shredded
1/2 cup olive oil
3/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
Peel grapefruit, section and remove seeds, reserving juice. Peel and slice
avocado. Combine juice grapefruit and avacado in bowl. Toss lightly. Cover and
refrigerate for 2 hours. Drain and toss with lettuce in serving bowl.
Combine olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper in jar. Shake vigorously. Toss over
salad. Serve immediately.

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Tomatoware Tomatofare
I've been haunting antique shows shops and flea markets for years. Which is
why the Inn is filled with an eclectic mix of antique furniture and bizarre collections. I'm
always on the lookout for that fabulous $10 unrecognized treasure. Happily, I've found
a couple. Like a gambler convinced a big win is at hand, I'm hooked on bargain
hunting. I've also outsmarted myself on occasion, by being part-smart about antiques.
Caveat emptor. Antique dealers are seldom as dumb as we would like to think they
are. If something is that cheap, it's probably a fake. You're the only one who doesn't
know it.
The first time I remember seeing "tomatoware", I laughed at the idea of making
dishes, teapots, creams and sugars, salts and peppers, and so forth, to look like
something so mundane as a tomato. "Who would buy that?" I said to Michael and we
scoffed. "I would never buy anything that gaudy!" I said smugly. Well, as my wise old
Grandma used to say, "Never say `never', you just never know!" Check out the front
cover of this book. Yes, that's our Chatham cupboard, circa 1900, and part of our
tomatoware collection, circa 1907. The Chatham was a contemporary of the Hoosier
cupboard and it stands in the Summer kitchen that was converted into an informal
family dining room. You see, we kept seeing it everywhere. We kept laughing at it. Until
we finally had to buy some because it was, well, bizarre. And after all, it was cheap.
That was a few hundred dollars ago!
Once we were committed to ownership, we did some research. We found out
there are several nationalities of tomatoware. Surprisingly, the Italians don't make
tomatoware--too busy cooking with the original fruit, I suppose. The most expensive
is Bayreuth, made of fine china in Germany. Then there is cheap and cheerful
American pottery tomatoware. And finally there is knockoff Japanese pottery. Of
course, now that we specialize, we only collect the Occupied Japan tomatoware!
At least I stopped laughing at it. In fact, I think it's started to laugh at me. Note
the teapot on the cover. And I learned a whole lot more about antiques in the process.
The stuff has grown on me. Every year we have a tomato weekend to celebrate the

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lowly vegetable, or fruit to be more exact. We set a completely green and red table with
all our tomatoware plates and cups and saucers and serving dishes. Here are some
of our favorite tomatofare recipes that we serve on Tomato Weekend at The Quilt Inn.
Cool Tomato Soup
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 onion, chopped
3 cups tomatoes, peeled and seeded
1 cup chicken stock
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1 cup plain yogurt
2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
2 tbsp. fresh basil, chopped
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Heat oil over medium heat in saucepan. Cook onion for 3­4 minutes or until
soft. Add tomatoes and cook for 2 minutes. Pour in stock, bring to boil over high heat.
Lower heat and simmer, covered for 10 minutes or until tomatoes are tender. Let cool.
In blender, process tomato mixture until smooth. Add lemon juice. Whisk yogurt
in mixing bowl until smooth, whisk into tomato mixture. Whisk in parsley, basil, salt and
pepper. Serve chilled, garnish with a swirl of yogurt.
Fried Red Tomatoes
3 ripe tomatoes
1/3 cup olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp. fresh chopped thyme
1/4 tsp. hot pepper flakes
2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1/2 tsp. salt
Core tomatoes and cut into 1/2 inch slices. Dry with paper towel. Heat oil over

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low heat in skillet. Cook garlic, thyme and pepper flakes for 2 minutes or until fragrant.
Cook tomatoes, one layer at a time, for 3 to 5 minutes per side or until they just start
to soften. Drain with slotted spoon. Serve with parsley garnish.
Tomato Pepper Pasta
3 sweet red peppers
4 red potatoes
4 large ripe tomatoes
1/4 cup black olives, pitted
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced
1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped
1 lb. pasta noodles
1 small head radicchio, shredded
Halve the peppers, remove the seeds and membranes. Place in single layer on
baking sheet, skin side up. Broil until slightly blackened. Let cool, peel, cut into chunks.
Cook potatoes until tender. Let cool, cut into chunks. Core tomatoes, cut into
chunks. Combine tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, olives, sun-dried tomatoes and basil
in large mixing bowl.
Dressing:
1/2 cup olive oil
2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp. anchovy paste
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. hot pepper flakes
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Whisk together oil, vinegar, garlic, anchovy paste, salt, pepper flakes and
pepper. Pour over tomato mixture.
Cook pasta until tender. Drain well, toss immediately with tomato mixture. Serve
warm on a bed of shredded radicchio, with a Gewurtraminer wine.

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Did you know that tomatoes were thought to be poisonous until Ben Franklin
ate one to disprove the theory? I presume while flying the kite in the thunderstorm,
he had forgotten to pack a lunch, reached down for the nearest edible, and zap!
Classico Tomato Salad
4 ripe tomatoes
1 can artichoke hearts
1 cup Mozzarella cheese, cubed
1/2 sweet green pepper, diced
1 green onion, chopped
1/2 cup fresh basil, chopped coarsely
1/3 cup black olives, chopped
1/3 cup lemon juice
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Core tomatoes, chop into chunks. Drain artichokes, quarter. Combine
tomatoes, artichoke hearts, mozzarella, peppers, basil, olives and onion. Drizzle with
oil and lemon juice and toss. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with chilled
white Zinfandel wine.
Oriental Tomato Salad
3 large ripe tomatoes
1 cucumber
1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/2 cup fresh mint, chopped
1/2 cup fresh coriander, chopped
3 green onions, chopped
1 Spanish onion, sliced thin
Core tomatoes, cut into slices. Score cucumber lengthwise with fork, slice thinly.
Combine parsley, coriander, mint and green onions.
In serving bowl, layer Spanish onions, cucumber and tomatoes, sprinkling
parsley mixture between layers.
Dressing

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3 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. soy sauce
1 tbsp. sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1/3 cup vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
dash hot pepper flakes
Whisk together lemon juice, soya sauce, sugar and salt until sugar is dissolved.
Whisk in oil, garlic and pepper flakes. Pour over salad, set aside for 30 minutes at
room temperature to marinate. Chill before serving.
Stuffed Tomatoes
Preheat oven to 400F and lightly grease a baking sheet.
Slice of top quarter of 6 large meaty tomatoes. Scoop out insides being careful
not to cut through skin. Save scrapings from 3 tomatoes in mixing bowl. Turn tomatoes
upside down on paper towel to drain.
Stuffing:
1 lb. fresh spinach, washed and chopped
6 slices bacon, chopped into pieces
1 cup fresh mushrooms, sliced
3 green onions, chopped fine
3 tbsp. fine breadcrumbs
1/2 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
6 tsp. butter
Cook bacon until crisp in small skillet. Remove from skillet and place on paper
towels to drain. Pour excess fat from skillet, leaving enough to saute green onions and
mushrooms until golden brown. Using slotted spoon, remove from pan and add to
tomato pulp in mixing bowl.
Steam spinach until it is wilted. Drain and press out as much moisture as
possible. Chop coarsely and add to tomato pulp mixture. Stir 2 tablespoons of

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breadcrumbs into mixture. Toss lightly with salt and pepper.
Pat dry the insides of the tomato shells. Spoon spinach mixture into each
tomato and sprinkle with remaining breadcrumbs. Top each with teaspoon of butter.
Place tomatoes on baking sheet with tops. Bake for 25 minutes or until
tomatoes are cooked but still firm. Replace tomato tops before serving.
For alternative stuffing, to the tomato pulp add
1 1/2 whole corn kernels
1/3 cup green onions, chopped fine
1/3 cup sweet green pepper, chopped fine
4 tbsp. fresh basil, chopped
1 Jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped fine
2 tbsp. fresh coriander, chopped
1/2 cup sharp old cheese, crumbled
1/2 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
Toss all ingredients together lightly until well mixed. Fill tomato shells. Sprinkle
each tomato with yellow cornmeal and dot with butter. Bake as above.
Mama Lentini's Infamous Pasta Sauce
4 large ripe plum tomatoes
3 tbsp. unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 cup chicken stock
1/4 cup dry white wine
4 tsp. fresh basil, chopped fine
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Peel, seed and chop tomatoes. Melt 1 tablespoon butter over medium heat,
cook garlic until soft. Pour in stock and wine, simmer uncovered 3 to 5 minutes or until
reduced by half. Add tomatoes, basil, and remaining butter. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes
or until reduced by half. Add tomatoes, basil and remaining butter. Cook for 2 to 3

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minutes, stirring constantly, until flavors are blended. Add salt and pepper. Serve
tossed over angel's hair pasta, garnish with Parmesan cheese. Serve with red Merlot
wine.
Chili Sauce
14 cups ripe tomatoes, peeled and chopped
4 cups peeled cucumber, chopped
3 cups onions, chopped
2 tbsp. pickling spice
3 cups sugar
2 cups cider vinegar
2 tsp. celery seed
1/2 tsp. turmeric
1/2 tsp. curry powder
2 tbsp. all purpose flour
4 cups water
Boil water and combine with cucumbers, onions and salt. Let stand 1 hour.
Mix tomatoes, sugar, 1 cup of vinegar, celery seed, turmeric, and curry powder
in saucepan. Bring to boil, stirring often. Reduce heat, simmer for 30 minutes while
stirring.
Drain cucumber mixture, rinse well with cold water and drain. Add tomato
mixture. Simmer for 2 hours or until vegetables are tender and mixture reduces to 11
cups.
Combine flour with remaining vinegar, stir into sauce. Cook 5 to 10 minutes
longer bringing to boil and thickening. Pour into sterilized jars. Cover with new lids and
seal.
The famous French chef, Brillat-Savarin, once said, "Poultry is for the cook
what canvas is for the painter." That may be true, but have you ever tried to paint a
chicken?

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Bella Nocce Tomato and Chicken Ecstasy
6 chicken breasts
1/3 cup olive oil
3 tbsp. lime juice
1 tbsp. fresh rosemary
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Remove skin and fat from chicken. Place in shallow glass dish. Combine oil,
lime juice, rosemary and pepper, pour over chicken. Cover and marinate for 30
minutes at room temperature or overnight in refrigerator.
Drain chicken and pat dry. Broil or barbecue until chicken is no longer pink
inside, basting with marinade.
Serve chicken with Tomato Ecstasy, garnish with parsley. Serve with white
Chardonnay wine.
Tomato Ecstasy
5 ripe tomatoes
6 cloves garlic unpeeled
4 anchovy fillets, chopped fine
1 tbsp. fresh thyme
dash hot pepper flakes
2 tbsp. olive oil
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Place tomatoes and garlic in shallow glass baking dish. Scatter anchovies,
thyme and pepper flakes on top. Drizzle with olive oil. Bake in 400F oven for 40 to 45
minutes or until tomatoes are soft and garlic is tender. Let cool. Peel, halve, and seed
tomatoes. Peel garlic.
Puree tomatoes and garlic until smooth. Transfer puree to saucepan. Cook over
medium heat, stirring often, for 15 minutes or until thickened and reduced by 1/3a.
Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve over chicken.
Classic Thick Tomato sauce

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1/4 cup olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 cup celery, diced
10 lbs. plum tomatoes, peeled
2 potatoes
2 carrots, peeled
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. dried oregano
2 large sprigs fresh basil
2 large sprigs fresh parsley
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Heat oil over medium heat in large saucepan, cook onion and celery until soft,
about 6 minutes. In blender, finely chop tomatoes in batches. Add tomatoes, potatoes,
carrots, salt, oregano, basil, and parsley to saucepan. Reduce heat and simmer,
uncovered, for three hours or until reduced by a and sauce is thick. Remove herb
sprigs and discard. Remove potatoes and carrots, mash, and return to sauce to add
thickening.
Tomato Bruschetta
15 ripe plum tomatoes
2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
6 cloves garlic, minced
6 cloves garlic, slivered
1/4 cup green onions, chopped fine
1 tsp. lemon juice
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Thick cut coarse bread.
Chop tomatoes and toss in bowl with garlic and green onions and basil. Add
lemon juice, salt and pepper and 1/3 cup olive oil. Satue slivered garlic in 1/3 cup olive
oil until golden brown. Discard garlic and reserve oil.

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Toast bread and brush with garlic-flavored oil. Spoon tomato mixture over
bread, and serve.


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What Doth Hamlet Read....
Words, Words, Words
There's a pond beyond the barn. I suppose it was originally used for watering
cattle on the farmstead. Now it's just a bucolic landing field for migrant ducks and
geese. It's late Summer so the birds are gregarious and approachable, within reason.
Every evening Geoffie and I take leftover bread to the haggle of ducks at the pond. I
don't know what the collective noun for ducks is. I know flock of geese, flock of sheep,
herd of cattle. There's probably a proper name for ducks by the dozen. (It's called
"dinner" in France!) In the absence of knowledge I invented a haggle of ducks. If you've
ever fed ducks in a park in the city, you'll know why it's so descriptive. After all, aren't
collective nouns supposed to be descriptive? Shouldn't the wordsound evoke the
picture and be a metaphor for the group consciousness or character of the species in
question?
Some are, some aren't.
A pride of lions sounds good. It might be a little anthropomorphic but it's a good
visual. So is a swarm of locusts (even if it does give you yukkie frissons). I don't think
barrel of monkeys is the correct, albeit familiar, term.
I've never much liked litter of kittens. I prefer a tumble of kittens. That's the
picture. How about a scurry of mice. Or a frisk of colts? It makes me see them cavort
and kick up their heels. A thundering of horses. A circus of squirrels.
Whoever thought up some of these collective nouns wasn't using their
imagination. Why a school of fish? A platoon of minnows wheeling in mysterious and
synchronous formation would be much more appropriate. So would a hurdle of salmon,
leaping over obstacles to mate and die. Whenever I hear the term pack of wolves, I
think "six-pack" and it seems too orderly for such independent creatures. I can't help
picture them strung together with pulltabs. Sled-dogs maybe. A pod of peas makes
some sort of vegetative sense. It implies a husk-ness. But I don't know what a pod of
whales would be like. (We don't have any whales, so I suppose I have to leave that one

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alone.) But we shouldn't use the same word twice. A flock of sheep behaves differently
than a flock of birds.
There's a certain magic to naming things. Mark Twain wrote an amusing short
story about Adam and Eve working their way around Eden naming all the creatures.
As I recall, Eve did most of the naming, bagging all the good names, much to the
irritation of Adam. Quite so.
It seems mightily appropriate that we are called the race of humans, of course.
It's unquestionably a relay race. See the unique upright bipedal stance, arms with
opposable thumbs outstretched clutching a baton of tools to be passed from one
runner to another in the forward thrust of evolution.
Someone passed me a pen.
I will pass on a computer.
Our Garden of Earthly Delights
A Spike of Roast Asparagus
1 lb. asparagus
2 tbsp. olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
1 tbsp. lemon juice
Trim 1 inch off bottom of asparagus. Line baking sheet with aluminium foil.
Arrange asparagus on pan in single layer. Preheat oven to 425F. Drizzle asparagus
with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake 15 minutes. Drizzle with lemon
juice. Serve hot.
A Veneration of Vegetables Cheesecake
1 bunch of asparagus or broccoli, trimmed, cut into 1 inch pieces
6 large eggs
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, melted
3 cups cottage cheese

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2 cups grated cheddar cheese
1/4 cup parmesan cheese
1/4 cup dill
3 green onions, chopped
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
Steam asparagus or broccoli about 6 minutes. Drain. Combine eggs with flour,
butter, cheeses. Stir in asparagus or broccoli, then dill, green onions, salt and pepper.
Preheat oven to 350F. Butter 9"x13" baking dish. Pour in mixture. Bake 50 to 60
minutes.
A Cornucopia of Fall Vegetables
8 potatoes, quartered
2 onions, cut into wedges
6 cloves garlic, crushed
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 tsp. thyme
1/4 tsp. rosemary
1 medium butternut squash, peeled, cut into 3/4 inch cubes
1 red pepper, cut into 3/4 inch chunks
chopped fresh parsley to garnish
Preheat oven to 375F. In roasting pan, toss potatoes, onions and garlic with 3
tablespoons olive oil. Sprinkle with thyme and rosemary. Roast uncovered 35 minutes,
turning once. Toss squash and pepper with remaining oil. Add to pan. Continue
roasting 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender. To serve, garnish with parsley.
Hamlet's Acorn Squash Mushroom Puree
5 acorn squash
1/3 cup butter, melted
2 tbsp. brown sugar
1/2 tsp. salt

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1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
1/3 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/4 cup butter
1/2 lb. fresh mushrooms, sliced
ground nutmeg
Cut squash in half crosswise. Remove seeds. Place squash cut side down on
lightly greased baking sheet. Bake at 375F for 45 minutes. Scoop out pulp, leaving a
1/4 inch shell on six halves. Discard remaining shells.
Blend pulp, melted butter, brown sugar, salt, nutmeg and pepper until smooth.
Melt 1/4 cup butter in skillet. Add mushrooms. Saute over low heat 5 to 8 minutes,
stirring occasionally. Drain. Combine mushrooms and squash mixture. Spoon into
reserved shells. Place on baking sheet. Sprinkle with nutmeg. Bake at 350F for 15
minutes.
A Gaggle of Green Beans
1 lb. fresh green beans
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 large onion, chopped coarsely
5 cloves garlic, chopped
4 large tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup pitted olives
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1/2 tbsp. fresh ground pepper
Steam green beans until crisp tender (about 5 minutes). Heat oil in large skillet
over medium heat. Add onion and garlic. Saute for 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and wine.
Cook for 20 minutes. Add olives and beans and heat through. Sprinkle with lemon juice
and pepper.
A Blush of Baked Beets
2 lbs. beets

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3 tbsp. butter
2 tsp. raspberry vinegar
grated zest of 1 orange
1 tsp. caraway seeds
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
chives to garnish
Preheat oven to 350F. Trim beets, rinse, do not peel. Place beets in baking
dish. Fill pan with 1/4 inch water, cover with aluminium foil. Bake 1 hour. Remove foil.
Bake 30 minutes. Peel beets and slice into 1/4 inch thick rounds. Set aside.
Melt butter in skillet over low heat. Add beets. Sprinkle with vinegar, orange
zest, caraway seeds, salt and pepper. Cook, tossing gently, 3 to 4 minutes. To serve,
sprinkle with chives.
A Herd of Thundering Carrots
5 carrots, peeled and sliced ¼ inch thick
2 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
4 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. orange juice
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
10 dried apricots, slivered
1/3 cup sliced almonds, toasted
Steam carrots for 12 minutes. Stir sugar and cinnamon together until well mixed.
Set aside. Melt butter in skillet. Stir in carrots, orange juice, sprinkle with sugar
cinnamon mixture. Cook over medium heat until carrots are glazed and sauce is
slightly thickened. Season with salt and pepper. Stir in apricots and almonds. Cook 3
minutes.

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Hunka Hunka Burning Love
We had a special guest drop by the other day. Bill Parker was passing through
town and needing a place to stay, was recommended to The Quilt Inn by Horace the
pump jockey down at the Service Station across from the Cheese Shoppe. We're
always delighted to learn new and interesting things from our visitors but Bill's
comments on sitting down to one of our home-cooked meals, set us back a bit.
"Not very spicy," he said, adding more pepper from the pepper mill. "Do you
have any Tabasco Sauce or better yet, Sauce From Hell?" The latter, I learned, is a
local specialty in his town. It's prime ingredient is chiles and of course this led to a
conversation about these fiery little devils.
Bill travels out of his native State a great deal and was well prepared for the
relatively bland tastebuds of "foreigners". He had some Habenero peppers in his carry
bag which he generously offered to share with me. One taste and the heat was so
intense I nearly fainted. With a gasp, I asked Michael for three things. "Water! 911! Last
rites!"
Most people would avoid such incendiary peppers. Not Bill and his asbestos-
lined fellow gastronomes. Some crave the wave. They crave the heat.
Once I had recovered, Bill explained that a true pepper fiend wouldn't even flinch
at the ordinary Jalapeno, considering it child's play.
"Myself, I particularly like the Scotch Bonnet," said Bill, a native of Louisiana
where his mother had introduced him to the taste of spicy food. I'm rather fond of an
occasional drink,and the image of a "Scotch bonnet" produced a vision of Bushmill's
neat in a glass with a paper hat on it. It turns out that the Scotch Bonnet is a pepper, a
close cousin to the Habanero, related in the same way as the Hatfields and the
McCoys, who incidentally at this very time were having a war of their own in my
stomach. These two peppers are kings of the Scoville Scale, a system that rates
peppers based on capsaicin content, the compound that makes chiles hot.
At the bottom of the Scoville is the green bell pepper, with 0 Scoville Heat Units,
or "H.U." The Jalapeno, Bill said, smokes in around 2500 to 5000 H.U.'s. The

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Habenero and Scotch Bonnet fall into the 100,000 to 300,000 H.U. range. Other hot
chiles include the Thai, at 50,000 to 100,000 H.U., and the Pequin, Cayenne, and
Tabasco peppers at 30,000 to 50,000 H.U., and the Arbol, 15,000 to 30,000 H.U.
So, if you want to take the chile plunge, what do you do with them? Here's what
Bill suggests. Chiles will grow mould in a few short days. Store them in a dry place for
up to a week, or preserve them by roasting. Cover with a bit of olive oil.
A warning: handle the exotic chiles with care. Some can blister the skin, so wear
rubber gloves and do not touch your eyes with hands still contaminated.
Insidentally, chile peppers have less nutritional value than sweet peppers but still
contain vitamins A,C and E. Roast them, and vitamin levels decrease.
Roast Chiles If You Dare
Cut a small slit in the chile close to the end to let the steam escape. Place the
chile on a baking sheet directly under the broiler and turn with tongs. Or, bake them in
a 375F oven for 30 minutes. When the chile darkens and blisters, remove from heat
and place in a plastic bag or damp paper towels for 10 or 15 minutes. Remove from
bag and peel away skin. Chilies can be frozen in freezer bags for convenient use.
When do you use chiles and where? "Anytime, anyplace," Bill informed us.
"Anything you make or eat can be spiced up with a liberal, or conservative, sprinkling
of fresh or roasted chiles."
After a breakfast of spicy Heuvos Rancheros, Bill drove away, leaving us to
ponder this new information and whether or not our guests could handle the heat. But
as my Grandma would say, "If you can't handle the heat, get out of the kitchen!"
Or was that someone else? Never mind.
Heuvos Rancheros
2 eggs
2 tbsp. onion, chopped
2 tbsp. red pepper, chopped
2 tbsp. cooked sausage, sliced thin
2 tsp. butter

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2 tbsp. salsa
l soft flour tortilla (recipe follows)
salt and pepper to taste
Saute onion, red pepper and sausage in butter in small frying pan until tender.
Beat eggs, salt and pepper together. Pour over sausage mixture. Cook on medium
heat; turn once and cook other side.
To serve: spread salsa on warmed tortilla, top with cooked egg mixture and roll.
Tortilla
4 cups flour
1 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. baking powder
1 1/2 tsp. salt
warm water
Combine dry ingredients in mixing bowl with olive oil. Mix with hands. Pour in
water gradually until you can gather dough into ball. Knead for 3 to 5 minutes. (Rub
hands with olive oil to keep outside of dough from drying out.)
Heat griddle or skillet to medium. Cut dough into 20 portions. Flatten with hands
until 6 inches in diameter. Cook on griddle or skillet until slightly puffed and browned.
Turn over and cook other side. Do not overcook. Remove and cool slightly. If not using
immediately, store in air­tight container.
Pasta Peppers Please
1 sweet red pepper, roasted, peeled and seeded
1 clove garlic, chopped
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 tbsp. ground almonds
1 tbsp. olive oil
1 tbsp. cream cheese
dash Tabasco sauce
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 lb. cooked pasta

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fresh basil
In blender or food processor, puree garlic. Blend in red pepper, half the cheese,
the almonds, oils, cream cheese and hot pepper sauce. Season with salt and pepper.
Toss with pasta. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan cheese. Garnish with basil and
serve with white Zinfandel wine.
Harvest Vegetables With Chili
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 large red onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 zucchini, cubed
2 sweet red or yellow peppers, cubed
1 large eggplant, cubed
1 tsp. chopped hot pepper
4 tsp. chili powder
1 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. oregano
3 cups chopped tomatoes
2 1/2 cups water or chicken stock
1 1/2 cups green lentils
2 tbsp. lemon juice
In large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. cook onion and garlic, stirring
occasionally, for 4 minutes or until soft. Add zucchini, sweet peppers, eggplant and hot
pepper. Cook, stirring for 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, water and lentils. Bring to boil.
Reduce to low heat and cook for 40 to 45 minutes or until lentils are tender. For thicker
chili, uncover and cook to desired consistency. Stir in lemon juice and salt to taste.
Serve with crusty bread or cornbread.
From the Believe It Or Else file: a Carolina paint company is producing a line
of marine paints from Bill's beloved Jalapeno peppers that keeps barnacles off boat

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bottoms without polluting harbors. If barnacles won't touch the stuff...
And, apparently they're working with the even hotter Habaneros. I'm glad to
see a non-chemical environmental answer to the barnacle problem. Now if you told
me they were making a paint remover...!
Fresh Salsa
1 1/2 cups diced, seeded and peeled tomatoes
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1/4 cup chopped sweet yellow pepper
2 tbsp. chopped celery
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tbsp. red wine or cider vinegar
1 1/2 tsp. fresh hot pepper
1/4 cup chopped parsley
Combine tomatoes, onion, yellow pepper, celery, oil, vinegar, and hot pepper.
Cover and let stand for 20 minutes for flavors to blend. Stir in parsley. Season with salt
and pepper to taste and more hot pepper if desired. Serve as a condiment on
hamburgers, with grilled chicken, tacos or omelettes.
Hot Pepper Salsa Jalapeno
4 cups chopped peeled tomatoes
1 cup chopped sweet red peppers
1 cup chopped sweet green peppers
1 cup hot Jalapeno peppers
1 cup chopped onion
1/3 cup sugar
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
In large saucepan, combine tomatoes, sweet peppers, hot peppers, onion,

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sugar, garlic and salt. Pour in vinegar. Bring to boil and reduce to low heat. Cook,
stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes or until thickened slightly. Let cool. Refrigerate for
up to one month. Serve as a condiment.
Salsa and Cheese
2 cups medium cheddar cheese, grated
8 oz. cream cheese
1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp. Tabasco sauce
1 cup crushed nachos
Preheat oven to 400F and grease baking sheet.
Cream together cheddar and cream cheese, mustard, pepper and Tabasco
sauce. Shape into ½ inch thick rounds (makes 8 to 10). Press into nacho crumbs until
well coated. Place on greased baking sheet. Set aside. (May be made ahead and
refrigerated).
Salsa:
6 ripe tomatoes
1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/2 cup fresh coriander, chopped
4 green onions, chopped
2 Jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tsp. salt
Core, seed and dice tomatoes. Drain well in sieve. Combine tomatoes, parsley,
coriander, onions, peppers, garlic, and salt. Transfer mixture to serving bowl or
individual plates with slotted spoon.
Before serving, bake cheese round for 3 to 5 minutes or until cheese is warm
but not too runny. Remove from baking sheet with spatula and serve on top of salsa.
Serve with crusty bread and Sauvignon Blanc wine.
Creamy Salsa Dip

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1 cup tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1/4 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. chili powder
1 cup cream cheese
2 tbsp. mayonnaise
dash salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
Stir in remaining ingredients. Cover and chill. Serve with crudBlend cream
cheese and mayonnaise. ities (those are badly behaved vegetables) and nachos.
Seafood Salsa
1/2 lb. bay scallops
1/2 lb. crabmeat, flaked
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
1 tsp. grated tangerine rind
2/3 cup tangerine, chopped
1/2 cup tomato, seeded and chopped
2 tbsp. purple onion, finely chopped
1 tbsp. cilantro (parsley), chopped
1 tbsp. fresh jalapeno pepper, minced
1/3 tsp. salt
Cook scallops in skillet over medium heat for 3 minutes or until done. Drain.
Combine scallops and crabmeat, lime juice and tangerine rind. Cover and chill 1 hour.
Combine chopped tangerine, tomato, onion, cilantro, jalapeno and salt. Cover
and chill 1 hour.
To serve, combine scallop and tangerine mixtures in serving bowl. Serve with
baked tortillas or nachos..
Hot and Sweet Pepper Relish
4 cups prepared sweet peppers (3 green, 3 red, and 5 Jalapeno)

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3/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 box fruit pectin crystals
Halve peppers, discard seeds, chop fine. Measure 4 cups, including juice, into
saucepan. Add vinegar. Mix fruit pectin crystals with 1/4 cup sugar. Blend well.
Slowly add pectin mixture to peppers in saucepan. Cook over high heat, stirring
constantly until mixture comes to a boil. Stir in remaining sugar. Return to boil while
stirring and stir for 1 minute. Remove from heat. Skim off foam with a spoon. Pour into
sterilized jars, cover with new lids or paraffin wax. Store opened relish in refrigerator.
Green Chile Stew With Pork
3 lbs. boneless pork, cubed
3 tbsp. peanut oil
3 stalks celery, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, diced
7 green chiles, roasted, peeled and chopped
4 cloves garlic, crushed
chicken stock
salt to taste
Brown pork in oil in small batches. Place seared meat in large ovenproof
(fireproof!) casserole. Add celery, tomatoes, chiles and garlic. Deglaze frying pan with
chicken stock and add to pot. Cover ingredients with stock. Cover and simmer until
stew is thick and the meat is tender, about 1 1/2 hours. Add salt to taste.
Add a bit of Hot Pepper Salsa Jalapeno for more heat, if you dare. Serve with
potatoes, or cornbread.
Chile Slaw for the Brave
1 each sweet red, green, orange and yellow pepper
1 red onion
Core, seed and slice all peppers in a salad bowl. Peel and cut onion into slices,
separate rings. Toss together and set aside.
Dressing

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1 Jalapeno pepper, cored, seeded and minced
2 tbsp. tarragon vinegar
1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
2 tsp. sugar
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tbsp. sesame oil
1/4 tsp. Tabasco sauce
1 tbsp. caraway seeds, toasted
3 tsp. lemon or lime zest, grated
Combine all ingredients, except oils, zest and caraway seeds, in mixing bowl.
Slowly pour in oils while whisking briskly, until dressing is smooth and thick. Toss with
peppers. Sprinkle with caraway seeds and zest until well coated. Cover and chill for 2
hours before serving.

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Who Will Pick Up My Stitches When I'm Gone?
We went to a funeral today. A woman in the Quilt Guild passed away from
cancer. She left a grief-stricken husband and a bereft teenage daughter. She had been
an active quilter for many years and an important member of the Guild. Her death was
so sudden it caught everyone by surprise, including her, I think. Her last quilt was still
in the frame in a corner of the living room. Where the quilt extended past the area held
by the frame, there were many lengths of thread hanging loose, ready to be rethreaded
and continued along the pencilled quilt lines. I was filled with eerie tingles as I looked
at the now-unfinished quilt. Surely Carol would return at any time now and sit down at
the frame.
Carol's daughter left the frame standing and as the Guild members came by the
house, she welcomed them in and softly asked each of us if we would put a few
stitches in her Mom's last quilt. Each of us in turn picked up Carol's needles and thread
and carefully matched our stitches to hers. It felt somehow like an intrusion into
somebody else's work and at the same time felt like a connection, a final communion
with Carol.
Carol's daughter, a modern teenager, had never bothered to learn how to quilt.
She didn't need to. Her mother would make her anything she wanted. Today, however,
she asked us to show her how and she sat with us for a long time struggling with the
unfamiliar stitching technique. She is determined now to finish her mother's quilt. The
members offered to help. We are going to take over a full size quilt frame next week
and put Carol's quilt in it. That will allow several women to sit and quilt at the same
time, instead of just one. Quilting should be a communal activity. Every Tuesday
evening, whoever is available will go over and quilt with her. There is a teenage
daughter who needs to find her mother, and we, her mother's friends, will sit by her as
she does so.
When I think about picking up the stitches that Carol left unsown, I wonder who
will pick up my own unfinished stitches when I'm gone.

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Hostess Dishes
It's a tradition in most country communities that a wake follows a funeral.
Because the grief-stricken family is usually in no state of mind or preparation to
entertain large numbers of guests, it's also tradition that everyone brings one of their
own family dishes for the guests at the wake and for the family to use in the days
thereafter until life goes back to a semblance of being normal.
These easy-to-prepare hostess dishes are just as handy for happier
occasions, such as "Welcome to the neighborhood" get-togethers, "Congratulations
on the new baby" events, quilting parties, or just pot luck suppers, whenever family
and friends get together to share food and love. These dishes can often be made at
a moment's notice from what ever is in the refrigerator and are also good for "second
day" meals, using leftovers from the dinner the day before, making them
economical. Don't be afraid to substitute ingredients. These recipes are not written
in stone, or even on a crusty roll!
Turkey Tracks Casserole
2 cups cooked turkey
1/2 lb. fresh mushrooms
1/4 cup onion, chopped
1 cup wild rice
1 1/2 cups cream
2 1/2 cups turkey or chicken stock
1/2 cup Cheddar cheese, grated
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Wash wild rice in water several times to remove starch and soak in cold water
1 hour. Preheat oven to 350F. Drain rice and place in mixing bowl with turkey,
mushrooms, cream, onion, salt and pepper. Mix well. Add stock and pour into
ovenproof casserole. Bake for 1 1/2 hours. Sprinkle with grated cheese and bake
additional 20 minutes until cheese melts.

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Carol's ABC Casserole
A­2 lbs. fresh or frozen Asparagus
B­6 strips Bacon, cooked crisp and chopped
C­1 lb. cooked Chicken
2 cans condensed cream of mushroom soup
1/2 cup cream
1/4tsp. curry powder
dash Tabasco sauce
1/4 cup pimientos, chopped
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
Preheat oven to 400F. Layer asparagus, chicken and bacon crumbles in lightly
greased casserole dish. Mix soup, cream, curry powder, Tabasco sauce, and
pimientos in saucepan and cook on medium heat, stirring, until blended and smooth.
Pour over chicken mixture. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 20 minutes or
until heated thoroughly. Place under broiler briefly to brown cheese.
Storm At Sea Shrimp Casserole
1/2 lb. shrimp, cleaned and deveined
1/4 cup green pepper, chopped
1/4 cup onion, chopped
2 cups cooked wild rice
2 tbsp. butter
1 can condensed cream of mushroom soup
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup cheddar cheese, cubed
Preheat oven to 375F. Saute onion and green pepper in butter. Add wild rice,
mushroom soup, mustard powder, Worcestershire sauce, shrimp and cheese. Pour
into casserole and bake for 30 to 40 minutes.
Almandine Rice

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2 cups wild rice
3/4 cups almonds, chopped lengthwise
1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup onion, chopped
1/4 cup chives, chopped
1/4 cup green onions, chopped
1/4 cup green pepper, chopped
4 1/2 cups chicken stock
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Wash rice several times to remove starch. Soak in cold water for 1 hour. Drain
rice.
Preheat oven to 325F. Saute onion, chives, green onion and green pepper until
tender. Add rice and cook, while stirring, over low heat until rice begins to turn clear.
Add stock, salt and pepper. Mix in almonds. Bake for 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally,
or until rice is cooked and liquid is absorbed.
Delectable Mountains Broccoli and Cauliflower Casserole
1 1/2 cups broccoli florets, steamed but still crisp
1 1/2 cups cauliflower florets, steamed but still crisp
1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup all purpose flour
2 1/2 cups milk
1 tsp. curry powder
1 tbsp. apricot chutney or marmalade (for recipe, see index)
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
1 cup Swiss cheese, grated
Preheat oven to 350F. Melt butter in saucepan. Whisk in flour. Cook 2 to 3
minutes, stirring, but do not brown. Whisk in milk. Bring to a full boil. Stir in curry and
chutney. Reduce heat. Simmer for 5 minutes. Add salt and pepper. Stir in cheese.
Cook until cheese melts.
Place broccoli and cauliflower in buttered casserole. Pour sauce over top.

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Topping:
1/4 cup melted butter
1 1/2 cups bread crumbs
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
Mix all ingredients together and sprinkle over vegetables and sauce. Bake for
20 minutes or until bubbling.
Waldorf Pasta Casserole
1 1/2 cups elbow macaroni, cooked
1 lb. spinach, steamed and chopped
2 cups bean sprouts
1 lb. Feta cheese
2 onions, chopped and sauteed
1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
2 eggs
1/3 cup milk
fresh ground pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 350F and lightly grease casserole. Combine macaroni,
spinach, sprouts, cheese, walnuts, and onion in lightly greased ovenproof dish. Beat
egg and milk together and pour over casserole. Sprinkle with pepper. Bake for 20
minutes or until bubbly.
Ohio Star Pork and Potato Casserole
1 pork tenderloin, cut into medallions
3 cups potatoes, sliced thin
1 cup onion, sliced thin
1 clove garlic, minced
4 tbsp. Dijon mustard
2 tsp. dried thyme
2 cups heavy cream
1/4 cup dry white wine

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fresh ground pepper to taste
In a saucepan, bring cream and garlic to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 6 to
8 minutes or until reduced by 1/3. Add mustard, thyme and mix well. Set aside.
Steam potatoes for 30 seconds so potatoes are still crisp. Drain and rinse in
cold water. Pat dry on paper towels. Brown pork medallions in skillet over
medium­high heat. Remove chops and set aside. Use wine to deglaze skillet.
Preheat oven to 350F. In ovenproof casserole dish, layer half the potatoes and
onions, lay pork on top and pour pan juices over. Top with remaining potatoes and
onions. Pour reduced cream over top. Sprinkle with pepper. Bake for 1½ hours.
Dinah's Humdinger Spinach Casserole Sidedish
1 10­ounce package frozen spinach, thawed, drained, chopped
1/2 cup plain yogurt
2 tbsp. onion, minced
1 egg
2 cups Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1/4 cup milk
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
4 ounces spaghetti, cooked
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Mix egg, milk, onion, half the Parmesan, yogurt, salt and pepper. Stir in cheese,
spinach and spaghetti. Spoon into small ovenproof casserole dish or four individual
ramekins. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan. Bake at 350F for 30 minutes.
See also:
Blue Cheese Cassserole
Pasta and Feta Casserole

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The Wrong Arm of the Law
Early this morning, Jeff Bob Burnet, the town sheriff, dropped by to return our
post-hole digger. We sat for a spell in rocking chairs on the porch. There are strings
that run from the garden to the carved wood "gingerbread" trim that runs under the
eaves where morning glories and string beans grow up. It makes a cool dappled
shade on the porch on a late August morning as the day begins to get too hot. We had
fresh blueberries at the Inn so we tucked into some blueberry oatmeal squares.
Despite being careful not to have the luscious purple fruit stain our fingers, we left
unmistakable incriminating fingerprints on our napkins.
As we enjoyed our morning cup of coffee, we shared some local gossip and I
was reminded of the story about how Jeff Bob got to be sheriff. Jeff Bob's always been
something of a loose cannon as a sheriff but you would have a hard time replacing him
now. His notoriety and popularity came as a result of his unbridled and perhaps unwise
enthusiasm in running for the job of sheriff.
County elections are usually low key and uninteresting events around here, and
in most other places for that matter. There's the usual flutter of hand-made support
signs that litter lawns and shop windows for several weeks. The local newspaper
carries each nominee's election ad, which is usually not much more than conservative
resumes and raison de vote. The strength of most nominees' credentials seem to lie
on their stable home life (wife, 3 kids, dog Spot), and number of years in the
community. Knowledge of law is never much of a factor. Not much remarkable happens
and then the keys to the two cell jail building change hands quietly. And life goes on.
Until the year Jeff Bob decided to run. Which is tough to do when you have your
foot in your mouth. Jeff Bob was decidedly at a disadvantage since he's a forty-plus
bachelor and only moved here five years previously after being laid off from a
steelworker's job. He came, temporarily, to help his brother-in-law and ended up
staying. It often happens that way.
But Jeff Bob brought some dark clouds with him. It seems there was a great
deal of rancor and hard feelings at the steel plant between the management and the

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workers. He was one of the many caught in a political and financial crossfire, and he
deeply resented the predictable outcome, "out you go". I guess he was still stinging
from the surprise and earnestly felt it was such an important issue, and, since he had
no sterling family and background to tout, that he unwisely assured the townsfolk in his
brief campaign ad that if elected he would always maintain an "open door policy" with
regards to his job as sheriff. He meant there would be no surprises.
It was a deadly phrase. The small ad never did explain his intention behind the
expression. Brevity led to levity. What sort of town has an "open door" jail? The
morning the newspaper hit the sidewalk there was mixed hilarity and consternation
around town. He meant, of course, open door to the community, not to offenders but
that's not how it sounded and the local wags razzed him mercilessly for weeks before
the election. It as hard to tell if the red face JB stomped around town in was from
embarrassment, or anger.
The surprise came on election day and none was more surprised than Jeff Bob
when he won. Perhaps the wags felt they owed him their vote, to give him back his
face. Perhaps there were enough people around town, like myself, who think you just
gotta vote for a guy with either the silliness or the earnestness to profess an open door
policy for a jail.
So now it's passed into being a gentle joke. Even Jeff Bob wears it lightly.
Although we're still a town divided. There are those who want to put up a sign
proclaiming our status as a town with an open door policy jail, and those who are
definitely not amused at all.
Jeff Bob's Open Door Butter Tarts
Preheat oven to 425F.
1 double pie crust (recipe below)
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup corn syrup
1/4 cup shortening
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tsp. vanilla

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1/4 tsp. salt
3/4 cup raisins
Roll out dough. Cut into 4 inch rounds. Fit into tart pans. Combine all
ingredients, mixing well. Sprinkle raisins in pastry shells. Fill each shell 2/3 full with
syrup mixture. Bake on bottom of oven for 12 to 15 minutes or until set. Don't overbake.
Cool on wire rack, then remove from pans.
Doing Time Chocolate Chip Cookies
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 tsp. vanilla
2 eggs
2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp. baking soda
2 cups chocolate chips
Preheat oven to 350F, grease cookie sheets. Cream together butter and
shortening. Gradually add sugars, creaming well. Beat in eggs and vanilla. In separate
bowl, combine flour and baking soda. Blend into cream mixture. Stir in chocolate chips.
Chill dough for several minutes.
Drop by tablespoonfuls onto baking sheets. Flatten slightly. (If you drop high
enough, no need to flatten!) Bake for 8 to 9 minutes or until golden brown around the
edges. Let cool on sheet before removing. Set on wire racks to finish cooling.
Sweet `N Sour Key Lime Pie Worth Stealing
Serve in small, small pieces. You may not look generous, until your family
and guests taste how rich this is!
Crust
1 cup Graham cracker crumbs

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1 1/2 tsp. icing sugar
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
5 tbsp. melted butter
Combine crumbs, icing sugar, and cinnamon in 9 inch pie plate. Pour in butter
and blend well. Pat mixture firmly to form crust. Chill 30 minutes or until firm.
Preheat oven to 350F.
Filling:
3 egg yolks
1 can sweetened condensed milk
rind of 1 lime, finely grated
1/2 cup fresh lime juice (about 3 limes)
Beat egg yolks. Slowly beat in milk, mixing well. Stir in rind and juice. Pour into
prepared shell. Bake for 12 minutes or until barely set. Remove and cool. Serve at
room temperature for the best flavor. Garnish with whipped cream and thinly sliced
fresh lime.
Aunt Ivy's Three Fruit Cobbler
8 cups mixed fruit, peaches, plums, apricots, chopped
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp. all purpose flour
zest of 1 orange
1 tsp. cinnamon
Preheat oven to 400F, and lightly grease 12 inch square glass baking dish.
Cut fruit into chunks, mix with sugar, flour, cinnamon and zest. Spoon into baking
dish.
Topping:
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup sugar

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6 tbsp. cold butter
2 eggs
1 cup buttermilk
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2 drops almond extract
1/4 cup blanched almonds, sliced
Sift dry ingredients together. Cut in butter with pastry cutter, two knives or your
fingertips until coarse lumps are formed. Blend in eggs, buttermilk, vanilla and almond
extracts. Spoon over fruit and spread evenly. Sprinkle with almonds. Bake for 30
minutes or until golden brown and firm to the touch. Cool on wire rack. Serve warm or
chilled.
Date, Nut and Oatmeal Loaf
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. cloves
3/4 cup butter
2 cups dark brown sugar
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups dates, chopped fine
1 cup walnuts, chopped coarsely
2 cups rolled oats
Preheat oven to 350F and grease loaf pan.
Sift flour, soda, cinnamon and cloves together in mixing bowl. Pour 1 cup boiling
water over rolled oats, mix well. Cool, then blend in butter, sugar, eggs, dates and
walnuts. Blend into dry ingredients and mix well. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes or until
done.
Wholesome Folsom Pound Cake
4 1/2 cups cake and pastry flour

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3 cups sugar
8 egg whites
1 1/2 cups low­fat sour cream
1 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
2 tsp. vanilla extract
Cream sugar and margarine until smooth. Gradually add egg whites. Beat well.
Combine sour cream and baking soda. Stir well and set aside. Combine flour
and salt. Add to creamed sugar mixture alternating with sour cream mixture. Stir in
vanilla. Spoon into 10­inch non­stick baking pan. Bake at 325F for 1 1/2 hours or until
wooden toothpick comes out clean when inserted into center. Cool in pan before
removing.
For variations: instead of vanilla (or in addition to it) add 1 tsp grated lemon
rind; 1 tsp almond extract; 1 tsp rum flavoring.
Jailhouse Molasses Bars
1/3 cup margarine or shortening
1 cup sugar
1 egg, well beaten
1/2 cup molasses
1 tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. hot water
2 1/2 cups cake and pastry flour
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ginger
Preheat oven to 350F. Cream margarine and sugar. Add egg and molasses.
Dissolve baking soda in hot water and add to mixture. Add dry ingredients. Batter
should be quite stiff. Smooth into baking pan. Dust top with sugar and pat with fingers.
Bake 25 minutes or until done.
Pumpkin Cookies

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1/2 cup margarine
2 eggs
2 to 2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 cup rolled oats
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
3/4 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup pumpkin pie filling cup raisins
3 tsp. baking powder
dash salt
Preheat oven to 350F and grease baking sheets.
Sift dry ingredients together in mixing bowl. Gradually blend in margarine, eggs
and pumpkin. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto baking sheets. Bake 20 minutes or until done.
Burden of Proof Blueberry Squares
2 cups blueberries
1/2 cup sugar
2 tbsp. cornstarch
1/4 cup water
1 tbsp. lemon juice
Stir together blueberries, sugar and cornstarch in saucepan. Mix in lemon juice
and water. Bring to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer until mixture
thickens (about 3 minutes). Let cool.
Crust and Topping:
1 1/2 cups rolled oats
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp. baking pwder
pinch salt
3/4 cup butter, melted
Combine oats, flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in large mixing bowl. Drizzle
with butter and stir until well blended. Spread half the mixture into wellgreased 8­inch

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baking pan. Pat firmly. Cover with blueberry filled. Sprinkle remaining oat mixture over
top. Bake at 350F for 40 to 45 minutes or until golden brown. Cool before cutting
squares.
Contempt of Court Rhubarb Squares
4 cups strawberries
2 cups rhubarb, chopped
1 cup sugar
2 packages unflavored gelatin
2 egg yolks
1 cup light cream
2 tsp. vanilla
1 tsp. grated lemon rind
1/2 lb. cream cheese
2 egg whites
1/2 tsp. lemon juice
Set aside half the strawberries for garnish. In small saucepan, crush remaining
berries. Add rhubarb. Bring to slow simmer over medium for 6 to 7 minutes or until
rhubarb is tender. In mixing bowl, combine half the sugar with 1 envelope gelatin.
Sprinkle over hot fruit mixture. Stir until dissolved. Chill, stirring occasionally until
mixture is partially set (about 30 minutes).
Prepare Vanilla Pecan Crust:
1 cup vanilla wafer crumbs
1/2 cup ground pecans
2 tbsp. sugar
1/4 cup butter, melted
Preheat oven to 350F. Combine crumbs, pecans and sugar in small bowl.
Blend melted butter into mixture until crumbly. Press mixture into 8­inch baking dish.
Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until firm and deep golden brown. Cool.
Spread rhubarb mixture over crust. Set aside.
In heavy saucepan, combine 1/4 cup of remaining sugar, remaining gelatin,

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yolks and cream. Cook over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring constantly, until
thick enough to coat spoon. Pour into separate bowl. Stir in vanilla and rind. Chill,
stirring often, until partially set and cooled.
In separate bowl, beat cream cheese. Gradually beat in custard until smooth.
In separate bowl, beat egg whites with lemon juice until soft peaks form. Gradually beat
in remaining sugar until stiff peaks form. Stir in 2 tablespoons of egg white mixture into
cream cheese mixture. Fold in remainder. Pour over rhubarb layer, smoothing top.
Cover and chill 1 hour. To serve, slice reserved strawberries and arrange on top.
Gingersnaps
4 1/2 cups all purpose flour
2 1/2 cups dark brown sugar
2 cups butter, softened
3 eggs
3/4 cup molasses
1/4 cup ground ginger
1 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
Preheat oven to 325F and grease baking sheets.
Cream butter and sugar in large mixing bowl until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs
and then molasses. Sift together flour, ginger, cinnamon, soda and salt. Stir dry
ingredients into butter mixture until thoroughly mixed. Cover for 30 minutes and set
aside.
Drop batter by tablespoonfuls onto baking sheets. Flatten cookies. Bake for 10
to 15 minutes or until browned. Let cookies cool slightly, then place on wire racks to
cool.
Mayor "Uncle Al" Brown's Apple Pie
9 inch pastry shell, unbaked (recipe below)
5 cups apples, peeled, cored and sliced (Our favorites are Granny Smith,

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which are tart and juicy, and are usually imported from Australia, New Zealand or
Canada; we also grow Ida Red and Northern Spy for fabulous pies and tarts. If you
want great cider, use Jonathans; for wonderful apple sauce, try Gravensteins)
2/3 cup sugar
1 tbsp. cornstarch
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/3 tsp. cloves
1/3 tsp. allspice
3 tbsp. butter, softened
1 cup cheddar cheese grated
Preheat oven to 425F and line pie plate with pastry.
In large mixing bowl, pour melted butter over apples and toss gently, coating
apples thoroughly.
In small mixing bowl combine sugar, cornstarch and spices. Sprinkle 1
tablespoon of this mixture over pie shell. Add remaining spice mixture to apples, toss
gently. Spoon apples into pie shell and bake for 30 minutes or until tender. Remove
from oven and sprinkle cheese over apples. Return to oven for 3 minutes or until
cheese melts. Serve warm.
The Quilt Inn Pie Crust
You can use this crust for fruit pies and tarts, both sweet and savory. When
you want sweet, add sugar. When you want savory, add herbs. If you have a custard
or fruit pie or tart, partially bake the crust before adding the filling.
2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. sugar or 1 tsp. fresh herb or 1 to 2 tsp. dried herb or spice
8 tbsp. unsalted butter, cold, cut into pieces
6 tbsp. vegetable shortening, cold
5 to 6 tbsp. ice water
The key to great pastry is to have all the ingredients cold. Work in a cool kitchen

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if you can, and, ideally, do your preparation on marble. Always prepare your pastry and
then turn on the oven. And don't overwork the dough--it will be tough if you do. (The
crust, that is.)
Combine flour and salt in mixing bowl. Add sugar or herbs. Add butter and
shortening, and working quickly, use a pastry blender, 2 knives, or your fingertips to cut
in the ingredients until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle ice water over
the mixture 1 or 2 tbsp. at a time, and toss after each addition. When you can gather
the dough into a ball, you've added enough water. Transfer the dough to a cool surface,
and using the heel of your hand, push the dough away 1/4 cup at a time. Repeat until
all dough is "smeared". This will make a flaky crust. Gather the dough into a ball, divide
in half. Flatten each half slightly, wrap in wax paper and refrigerate 30 minutes to 1
hour.
When you're ready to bake, roll out the dough, again on a cool table (Formica,
wood or marble are best). Lightly flour the surface and the top of the dough. Rub a bit
of flour on your rolling pin. Flatten the dough into a disk shape and then roll from the
center to the edge. Lift and turn the dough while rolling, sprinkling lightly with flour to
prevent sticking. Rolll the dough until it is about 1/3 inch thick and extends about 1 1/2
to 2 inches beyond the edge of the pie plate. If you need to "patch up" the dough,
moisten the edges with water first so that they will stick together.
When you're making a two-crust pie, seal the upper and lower crust with water,
and "flute" the edges with a fork. Cut slits in the upper crust to allow steam to escape.
The top crust can be either plain, or try one of the following glazes for a special effect:
brush lightly with milk or cream; sprinkle the crust with sugar; brush with a beaten egg
and water (just a bit) mixture.

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Follow-wing The Leader
Michael and I were sitting on the porch the other day, enjoying some early warm
Spring weather. High overhead a flock of Canadian Geese were circling, preparing to
land in the pond, to pause and refresh, before continuing their long journey North. The
famous V-formation is a familiar and welcome sight, albeit a curious one. Although a
lot of birds flock and fly together, geese seem to be the only birds with such an
organized flight path.
Scientists and aerodynamic experts discovered that the geese fly in this pattern
for a very good reason: as each bird flaps its wings, it creates an uplift for the bird
immediately behind. By flying in V-formation, the whole flock adds at least 70% greater
flying range than if each bird flew alone. Whenever a goose falls out of formation, it
suddenly feels increased drag and air resistance, so it quickly gets back into formation
to take advantage of the lifting power of the other birds in the flock.
This is really good news for heavy birds with a long way to go, like geese. I
wonder why they don't teach other birds to do likewise. And how about us--the
unlikeliest flyers of all? If we work together, and share a common direction and a sense
of purpose, we will all get to where we are going quicker, and easier, because we will
be travelling on the trust, and the thrust, of each other.
One of the wonderful sounds of Spring is the inimitable honking of the returning
geese as they travel along together. The geese in the rear are honking encouragement
to those up front, as if to say, "Don't give up, keep up your speed, our goal is just
around the corner!"
When one of the geese is sick or wounded or simply too tired to fly today, two
other geese will fall out of the flock, and watch over it until it recovers or dies. Then they
will rejoin the original flock, or start one of their own. We, too, must look after others
through the bonds of humanity and common sense. We must help those who are
wounded, which sometimes includes ourselves, and then start again with renewed
purpose.
Being lead bird is a tough job and takes the most amount of energy. When the

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leader tires, it falls back. There is always another in the flock to take up the lead. Every
bird in turn takes the lead.
It occurs to me that if we have at least as much sense as geese, we will stay in
formation with others who are also going in the same direction as we are, and take
advantage of the momentum that others have created for us. Take the lead when called
on, and let others take the lead when we tire.
Light cooking trends today call for less red meat in the diet. Those "heavy"
birds like turkey, goose and chicken make healthy alternatives.
Zydeco Turkey
1 lb. cooked turkey, cut in bite size pieces
4 strips bacon
1 medium onion, chopped coarsely
1 clove garlic, minced
2 stalks celery, chopped
5 tomatoes, chopped coarsely
1 cup mushrooms, quartered
1 green pepper, chopped coarsely
2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 cup white wine
1/2 tsp. dried thyme
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp. sugar
pinch cayenne to taste
1 1/2 tbsp. cornstarch
Fry bacon in saucepan until crisp. Remove, drain on paper towels, chop
coarsely and set aside. Saute onion, garlic and celery in bacon drippings. Add
tomatoes, mushrooms, green pepper, parsley, wine, thyme, bay leaf, sugar, cayenne
and salt. Bring to boil. Simmer 15 minutes. Stir in turkey and bacon and bring to boil.
Remove bay leaf. Reduce heat.
Combine cornstarch will just enough cool water to make thin paste. Stir

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cornstarch into turkey mixture. Simmer for 2 minutes or until thickened. Serve over rice.
Slow-Cooked Chicken and Cabbage
1 chicken, cut into pieces (remove skin optional)
5 medium onions, sliced thinly
1 head cabbage, cut in chunks
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. thyme
pepper to taste
1 cup water
1/2 lb. piece of salt pork or 6 strips of bacon
flour to coat chicken pieces
Melt pork, or fry bacon, in frying pan. Dip chicken in flour and brown in pork fat.
Remove from pan. Sauteonions in pork or bacon drippings.
Place all ingredients in large saucepan or fireproof casserole. Simmer for 2
hours. Remove remaining piece of salt pork before serving.
This dish can be easily prepared in a slow cooker ("crock pot"). Reduce water
to 1/2 cup and cook on low.
Roast Chicken
2 whole broiler chickens (3 1/2 lbs. each)
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/3 dry white wine (or chicken broth)
2 tbsp. rosemary leaves, crushed
2 tbsp. tarragon leaves, crushed
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
2 cups cooked rice (or wild rice mix)
1 fresh pear, washed, cored and chopped
Combine rosemary and tarragon with wine in small bowl. Let stand 1 hour.
Strain and reserve liquid. Blend butter into herbs.

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Sprinkle cavity of each chicken with some of the salt and pepper. Add
tablespoon of herbed butter. Loosen skin over breast and press in tablespoon of
herbed butter.
Saute pear in half of remaining butter. Blend with cooked rice. Stuff chickens
with rice and truss.
Melt remaining butter. Brush over chickens. Sprinkle with remaining salt and
pepper. Place chickens in roasting pan. Combine remaining butter with wine. Roast
at 350F for 1 3/4 hours, basting frquently with herb wine mixture.
Drunkard's Path Turkey
Our friend Gail makes it through the one meal of the year that she cooks this
way: she gets up at ten o'clock (her children are grown-ups, or pretend to be); she
does her face and hair and heads for the kitchen; she opens a bottle of her favorite
wine and sips it while she makes Christmas dinner. By the time the turkey is cooked,
so is Gail! This isn't her recipe, but it reminds us of her.
1 turkey, cut in pieces
Marinade:
1 cup dry red wine
1/2 cup Bourbon
1/2 cup dry sherry
1/3 cup soy sauce
3 tbsp. vegetable oil
2 tbsp. sugar
5 whole anise seeds
1 tbsp. fresh ginger, minced
fresh ground pepper to taste
Mix all the marinade ingredients in a large bowl. Add turkey pieces and coat
thoroughly. Cover and let sit 3 hours.
Preheat oven to 325F.
Remove turkey from marinade and place in roasting pan. Pour 1/2 cup of

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marinade over turkey. Bake 1 hour, turning and basting as necessary. Increase oven
to 450F.
Glaze:
1 cup Bourbon
2/3 cups honey
2/3 cups ketchup
1/4 cup brown sugar
Mix glaze ingredients thoroughly in bowl. Brush turkey with glaze. Bake 30
minutes, basting and turning every 5 minutes.
Chicken Jambalaya
1 6­lb. baking chicken, cut up
2 pounds smoked sausage, cut in 1­inch pieces
4 cups rice, uncooked
1 large onion, chopped
3 quarts water
1 cup vegetable oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup green pepper, chopped
1 1/2 tbsp. red pepper
1 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
2 tbsp. fresh chopped parsley
Combine salt and pepper. Sprinkle over chicken. Heat oil in large Dutch oven.
Add chicken pieces. Brown on all sides. Remove from pan, drain on paper towels and
set aside.
Add onion and garlic to oil in Dutch oven. Saute until tender. Remove, drain and
set aside. Add sausage to pan. Cook over medium heat until browned. Remove, drain
and set aside. Discard pan drippings.
Return chicken, onion, garlic, sausage and water to Dutch oven. Bring to boil.
Reduce heat, cover and and simmer 2 1/2 hours or until chicken is tender. Add green

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pepper, parsley and rice. Stir well. Cover and cook over low for 45 minutes or until
liquid is absorbed.
Grilled Chicken and Mustard
4 chicken breasts, boned
2 tbsp. green onion, minced
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 tsp. grainy mustard
1 tbsp. vegetable oil
2 tsp. lemon rind, coarsely grated
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
salt and pepper to taste
Stir together all ingredients and coat breasts all over. Marinate in refrigerator
for 2 hours.
Heat grill to medium­high and grill breasts for 4 minutes. Turn and grill until
chicken is throughly cooked.
Turkey Wellington Boots
2 turkey tenderloins
2 1/2 oz. ham-flavored turkey, sliced thin
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup onion, chopped fine
1/2 lb. fresh mushrooms, chopped fine
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/2 tsp. marjoram leaves, crumbled
2 tbsp. brandy
1 sheet puff pastry (if using frozen, thawed)
Melt butter in small saucepan. Add onions and mushrooms. Saute until tender.
Add parsley and marjoram. Stir in brandy. Simmer until mixture is almost dry. Remove

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from heat and chill.
Heat skilled to high. Sear tenderloins on all sides until browned. Remove and
cool.
Roll pastry on lightly floured board to 15"x40" sheet. Cut in half. Spread 1/2 of
chilled mushroom mixture on each piece to within 1/2­inch of edges. Cover with half
of sliced ham­flavored turkey. Place seared tenderloin in center of pastry. Carefully
wrap pastry around tenderloin, sealing edges with water. May be refrigerated at this
point for cooking later.
Preheat over to 400F. Place pastries in baking pan. Prick pastry top with
toothpick. Brush with beaten egg. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until pastry is golden
brown. Remove and let sit for 5 minutes before slicing to serve.
Guests were saddened to note the absence of Myrtle from our pond this year.
She was a cantankerous old bird and ultimatelyshe succumbed to a bad habit:
pecked a sleeping dog once too often. She made a fine dinner and a good lesson:
better left alone than become a dinner bone...
Oriental Glazed Duck
1­5 pound duck, rinsed, patted dry
2 lemons, halved
salt and ground pepper to taste
3/4 cup soy sauce
3/4 cup ketchen
1/3 cup liquid honey
1/4 cup corn oil
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp. rosemary
2 green onions, thinly sliced for garnish
Preheat oven to 400F. Rub the duck inside and out with juice of 1 lemon. Pat
dry. Prick skin with fork. Sprinkle inside and outside with salt and pepper. Place
second lemon in cavity. Place duck, breast side up on rack in shallow roasting pan.
Bake for 30 minutes.

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While duck is roasting, make glaze. Combine soy sauce, ketchen, honey, oil,
garlic and rosemary in small mixing bowl. Mix well. Reduce oven temperature to 350F.
Pour off fat. Pour glaze over duck. Baste frequently and cook 1 hour and 15 minutes.
Remove duck from oven. Let stand 15 minutes. Skim off fat from roasting pan. Reheat
glaze, pour over duck and garnish with green onions.
Wild Goose Chase
1 cup dried apricots, halved
2 cup. dried prunes, halved
1/2 cup Madeira wine
1 goose (12 pounds)
juice of 1 orange
2 tart apples
grated zest of 1 orange
salt and pepper to taste
dash paprika
8 slices bacon
1 1/4 cups Wild Goose Sauce (recipe below)
Place apricots and prunes in mixing bowl. Add Madeira. Mix and set aside.
Preheat oven to 325F. Rinse goose and pat dry. Prick all over with fork. Rub
inside and out with orange juice. Add apples and orange zest to apricots and prunes.
Sprinkle goose inside and out with salt, pepper and paprika. Stuff cavity with fruit.
Skewer opening closed. Lay bacon slices across breast. Place goose, breast side up,
in shallow roasting pan. Roast for 1½ hours, removing accumulated fat every 30
minutes. Remove bacon and roast for 1 hour more, removing fat after 30 minutes.
Remove from oven. Let stand 20 minutes before carving.
Make sauce:
pan drippings from roasted goose
2 green onions, chopped
3/4 cup chicken stock
1/2 cup Madeira wine

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1 tbsp. peppercorns, slightly crushed
1 tsp. cornstarch
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Scrape brown pan drippings into saucepan. Add green onions, 1/2 cup stock,
Madeira and peppercorns. Simmer 5 minutes. Mix cornstarch with remaining 1/4 cup
stock until smooth. Slowly drizzle into sauce, stirring rapidly. Add salt and pepper. Stir,
simmer 5 minutes. Serve over duck.
Send the Servants to the Cellar
If you rise early enough you may see a dusty old pickup truck parked in our front
yard. It belongs to one of the many invisible people who help make an Inn run smoothly.
In this case it's Clareville's only resident Russian emigre, Tamara Shostokovitch. ("Not
that one, da'link, he vas much too bourgeois!" she would always explain.) Tamara is
anywhere upwards of seventy--it's your guess. And although she wears grubby old
American blue jeans, her frazzled grey hair is still held back in place by a colorful
Babushka, the ubiquitous Russian kerchief.
Tamara runs a small market garden and supplies us with fresh vegetables such
as potatoes, cabbage and squash, common vegetables to be sure, but staples that are
familiar and comfortable for her because they recall her childhood in a Russia very
different than today. She even delivers to us once a fortnight because she comes from
the "old school" when a fortnight meant something. What it means is, we never know
when she will arrive. She's always welcome.
This morning, after we helped her unload her produce into the root cellar, we all
went to the kitchen for a cup of coffee because today Tamara brought with her a
treasure from her homeland to share with us. It was a copy of A Gift To Young
Housewives by Elena Molokhovets. This wonderful book was a serious work at the
time, but is now both hilarious and nostalgic, and I'd like to share some of it with you.
Gift first appeared in Russia in 1861, the year of the emancipation of the serfs
("Serfs up!" was thereby introduced into the local lexicon). This huge volume of over

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4,200 recipes provides us with a window from which to view a lost and somewhat
forgotten age, where a well run household, serfless (see above) yet with servants, was
equal only to running a major corporation today. The typical young Russian bride
needed all the organizational capabilities of a major-general.
In fact, the author, Elena Molokhovets, was from a military family, and her meal
preparations came by her honestly. She had ten children, nine boys and a girl, as well
as many grandchildren, either too numerous to count or missing from the Russian
census. Gift was an instant and utter success, and Elena continued to revise, edit
(although clearly with a light hand) and add to the book for another 50 years, when she
disappeared without a trace, presumably a victim of the Revolution, or indigestion.
After the Revolution, she was quoted widely, albeit sarcastically, in Soviet
circles, such as her answer to the problem of unexpected guests. "Send the servant
into the cold cellar for hazel grouse or a ham." But of course! Many of Lenin's followers
held her responsible for representing the excesses of bygone days. Is Julia Child's fate
to be the same?
Anyway, after a few years, the acerbic humor became more wistful, and turned
eventually into disbelief. Could a time of such foodstuffs ever have existed in the
Motherland? Had family members ever sat down to huge meat pies, sturgeon in aspic,
mounds of crayfish, souffles and babas? Had there ever been a time when there was
so much caviar that it was used to clarify beef bouillon and then thrown away?
Even though the servants certainly weren't eating these delicacies, they did
have access to abundance. There were pirogi (a kind of pie), kasha (grains), shchi
(cabbage soup), kvass (a beverage fermented from black bread), beets, potatoes,
roast goose, duck, pork, and beef, many varieties of fresh, dried and marinated fish,
sauerkraut, sausage and pickles. These staples became harder and harder to find
after the Revolution, even with the exalted "progress" advertised on a yearly basis by
Lenin, Stalin, et seq. Twentieth Century modernism that never quite made it from
revolutionary tome to actuality.
Tamara, our Russian expatriate, urged us to incorporate many of the recipes
as regular fare at The Quilt Inn. I think not. Not because we are not adventurous but

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rather because the cookbook presupposes a completely different way of life than we
are used to now. Molokhovets assures us that we, too, can have fresh pears from our
orchard in the middle of Winter. How? According to Gift, each pear, carefully culled,
was placed in its own small individual copper saucepan with a lid and laid in the ice
house. (We don't have one of those, either). Every two weeks a servant wiped off each
and every pear, and the saucepan it rested in. (You can understand a people who rose
up and demanded a revolution, if only to be taken off pear detail!)
And even more, close to the house was a store room of vast size, used to hold
food for the almost-always large family, guests, and hangers-on. Mushrooms were
grown in the basement. Lemons were lined up on the shelves, none touching a sister,
each to be wiped dry every fortnight. Kegs of sauerkraut had to be poked once a week
with a pole to allow the dangerous build up of methane gases to escape. (Horrors! If
you missed a week of keg-poking...BOOM! Death by sauerkraut!) Cauliflowers strung
from the ceiling needed constant attention, and the windows were opened each
morning and closed each night. Even bacon had to be constantly rotated. And the cook
slept in the kitchen, on a foldout bed covered with a seaweed mattress. This was
necessary because cook was always preparing for the next repast. A simple dinner
took 24 hours to prepare, and who knew when the Cossack hordes would descend
upon the house (or your brother-in-law and his family!)
You may disagree, but our feeling is that a cookbook like A Gift To Young
Housewives is to be enjoyed as armchair travelling to the past, not as a "how to" for the
present. Thank you, Tamara, for sharing this wonderful nostalgic vision that is exotic,
thought provoking, unsettling and for forcing us to remember what was and why it isn't
that way anymore.
Cabbage Pilaf
1 onion, chopped
1 cup long grain rice
3 cups cabbage, chopped
3 tbsp. tomato paste
3 tbsp. olive oil

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2 cups water
1/2 tsp. caraway seeds
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
Heat oil in saucepan. Saute onions and rice on medium heat, until onions are
soft. Add cabbage. Stir until cabbage wilts. Stir in tomato paste, water, parsley, salt
and pepper to taste. Bring to boil, cover and simmer 30 minutes or until liquid is
absorbed.
Cabbagepatch Pork Chops
8 thick cut pork chops
1 medium cabbage, shredded
2 tbsp. butter
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup onions, chopped fine
1/2 cup white wine (or use red wine and red cabbage)
1 cup heavy cream
2 bay leaves
2 tbsp. bread crumbs
4 tbsp. Parmesan cheese
2 tbsp. melted butter
Shred cabbage and blanch in boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain well. Saute
garlic and onions in butter until soft. Add cabbage and seasoning. Cook 5 minutes. set
aside.
Season pork chops. Saute meat until brown on both sides. Set aside. Discard
fat from pan and deglaze with wine. Reduce liquid to 4 cups (of course, we're not sure
how you measure this, but we suggest you get a serf from pear-cleaning duty) and mix
with the cabbage. The liquid, not the serf!
Preheat oven to 350F. Spread a of the cabbage mixture in casserole or deep
glass baking dish. Layer 4 chops on top, a more cabbage, 4 more chops and
remaining cabbage.
Warm cream in saucepan. Add to casserole. Place bay leaf on top. Bake,

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covered, for 1 1/2 hours. Remove bay leaf and discard. Mix bread crumbs, cheese and
butter and sprinkle over casserole. Bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes until brown and
crusty.
Stuffed Cabbage
1 head cabbage
1 lb. lean ground beef
1/2 lb. lean ground pork
3/4 cup cooked wild rice
1 can tomatoes
1/2 cup tomato sauce
1/2 cup green onions, chopped
1 cup water
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cups sauerkraut, rinsed and drained
1/3 cup raisins
1/2 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. caraway seeds
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. ground ginger
1 tbsp. lemon juice
fresh ground pepper to taste
Core cabbage and cut in strips. Steam cabbage leaves until tender, about 5
minutes. Rinse in cold water, drain, and set aside.
Combine beef, pork, rice, green onions, caraway seeds, thyme and pepper in
large mixing bowl. Mix thoroughly.
Stir tomatoes, water, tomato sauce, raisins, brown sugar, lemon juice and
ginger together in another mixing bowl.
Place cabbage leaves one at a time on work surface. Spoon 1/2 cup meat
filling into center of leaf. Fold up bottom edge to cover filling. Fold in sides, then roll the
filled part on to the top. Repeat with remaining leaves and filling.

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Spoon 1 cup of sauerkraut into ovenproof casserole or shallow dish. Arrange
cabbage rolls on top, with "seams" down. Top with remaining sauerkraut. Pour tomato
mixture over cabbage. cover and bake at 350F for 2 hours.
Better "Red" Than Dead Cabbage
1 red cabbage
1 onion
4 tbsp. lard or shortening
4 sour apples, cored and diced
6 cloves
1/2 cup water
2 tbsp. vinegar
1 bay leaf
Slice cabbage and onion. Saute onion in lard until slightly brown. Add cabbage
and cook for 5 minutes. Add apples and other ingredients. Simmer for 1 1/2 hours.
Cabbage and `Shrooms
1 cabbage, chopped
1 onion, chopped fine
2 cups fresh mushrooms
2 tbsp. sour cream
butter
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Steam cabbage for 5 minutes. Satue onion in butter, add mushrooms and saute
another 5 minutes. Add cabbage and continue cooking until flavors blend. Just before
serving stir in sour cream.
Bullwinkle and Boris' Borscht
2 lbs. beets
3 cups red cabbage, shredded
2 cups Navy beans

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2 carrots, peeled and diced
2 leeks, sliced
1 parsnip, peeled and diced
1 onion, chopped
2 lbs. beef shortribs
2 cups plum tomatoes, chopped
6 cups beef stock
3 cups water
6 cloves garlic
1 tbsp. fresh dill
2 tbsp. tomato paste
4 cups chicken broth
2 tsp. caraway seeds
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
4 tbsp. olive oil
1/4 cup lemon juice
sour cream for garnish
Place beets in soup pot, cover with water and bring to a boil. Simmer 40
minutes or until tender. Remove beets with slotted spoon, reserve liquid. Remove beet
skins, grate beets coarsely and set aside.
Sear shortribs in oil for 15 minutes or until brown. Pour off grease. Add ribs to
soup pot and add beef stock, water, onion, garlic and dill. Bring to a boil, reduce heat
and cover. Simmer 1 hour. Add cabbage, beans, carrots, leeks, parsnip, tomato paste,
chicken stock and 2 cups of reserved beet liquid. Cover and bring to a boil, reduce
heat and simmer 15 minutes. Add caraway seeds, salt and pepper, tomatoes and
reserved grated beets. Simmer another 15 minutes.
Remove ribs from broth. Remove meat from bones, discard bones. Return meat
to broth. Add lemon juice. Return to heat, heat thoroughly. Serve with dollop of sour
cream.
Rainbow Salad

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1 medium head RED cabbage, sliced thin
1 GREEN Granny Smith apple, cored, shopped
1 small YELLOW onion, slivered
1/3 cup crumbled BLUE cheese
1/3 cup chopped walnuts
1 tbsp. honey
1 tbsp. grainy mustard
1/3 cup vegetable oil
3 tbsp. raspberry vinegar
salt and pepper to taste
Combine cabbage, apple and onion in large bowl. Toast walnuts until browned.
Add to cabbage mixture.
Cook honey in saucepan. Stir in mustard, oil, vinegar, salt and pepper. Heat to
boil. Pour over cabbage and toss well. Mix in cheese just before serving.
Pasta Cabbage Please
1/2 head cabbage
4 oz. pasta
1/3 cup green onions, chopped
4 tbsp. butter
1/2 cup chicken stock
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Cut cabbage into strips. Break pasta into short lengths and cook in boiling
water until tender. Rinse in cold water, drain well.
Melt butter in saucepan. Add cabbage. Cover and cook over medium heat until
tender but still crisp. Add the pasta and stock. Stir over low heat until heated through.
Season to taste and add green onions. Serve immediately.
Cabbage in the Bac Room
1 lb. bacon, cut in pieces
2 cups onion, chopped

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1 head red cabbage, chopped fine
2 tart apples, cored and cubed
1 cup raisins
3/4 cup red wine
3/4 cup red wine vinegar
2 tsp. caraway seeds
1 tsp. thyme
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Cook bacon in large pan over low heat for 15 minutes. Add onions and cook
until softened. Add remaining ingredients and stir well. Cover and cook over medium
heat for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Adjust seasonings and serve hot.
Tamara's Mother's Savory Cabbage Strudel
Strudel dough
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1/4 tsp. salt
1 egg
1/4 to 1/2 cups warm water or milk
2 tsp. vinegar
Sift flour and salt together in bowl. Beat egg with water or milk and vinegar.
Work liquid into flour mixture by hand to form dough. Knead on floured board until
dough is no longer sticky. Place in bowl, cover and let stand 30 minutes.
Roll dough as thin as possible. Stretch the dough gently from the center. this
should make about 2 yards square of very thin dough. Brush with melted butter.
Filling
4 lbs. cabbage, shredded
1 1/2 cups heavy sour cream
1 tsp. caraway seed
4 eggs, hard cooked and chopped
Steam cabbage for 5 minutes, and blanch. Press out excess moisture on paper
towels. Mix with sour cream, caraway and eggs.

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Preheat oven to 400F. Sprinkle filling over dough and roll loosely as the dough
will expand. Slide onto greased baking sheet. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle
with water. Bake for 20 minutes at 400F, then reduce heat to 350F. Brush strudel again
with butter and bake ten minutes more or until golden brown. Remove from oven and
dust with confectioners' sugar.
Cabbage Casserole
3 cups cabbage, shredded fine
1 1/2 cups stewed tomatoes
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. paprika
2 tsp. brown sugar
bread crumbs, fine
Parmesan cheese, grated
Preheat oven to 325F.
Steam cabbage for 5 minutes. Drain well and pat dry with paper towels. Cook
tomatoes, salt, paprika and sugar in saucepan. Butter a casserole dish. Layer with
cabbage and tomato mixture alternately. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese mixed with
bread crumbs. Bake for 30 minutes or until top is golden brown.
Cordon Bleu Cabbage
1 large head cabbage
Trim loose outer leaves from cabbage. Cut out stem and enough cabbage to
make a dep well.
Filling
2 cups cooked ground ham
1 cup bread crumbs
3/4 cups hard cheese, grated
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
salt to taste
1/2 tsp. paprika

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dash cayenne
Mix all ingredients in mixing bowl. Fill center of cabbage with filling. Steam for
1 hour or until tender, making sure pot does not boil dry. Wrap cabbage in heavy foil
and bake at 325F for 2 hours.
Cheese sauce
3 tbsp. butter
3 tbsp. flour
1 1/2 cups milk
1 cup cheese, grated
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
dash cayenne pepper
Melt butter in saucepan. Stir in flour and blend. Slowly stir in milk and bring
almost to a boil. When sauce is smooth and hot, reduce heat and stir in cheese and
seasonings. Stir until smooth.
To serve: cut cabbage into four servings (eight, if this is for lunch). Pour cheese
sauce over cabbage, dust with paprika for color.
Number One (Sharp) Coleslaw
8 cups cabbage, shredded
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
2 tbsp. onion, chopped fine
1 tsp. salt
2/3 cup vegetable oil
paprika
Combine all ingredients and toss to coat cabbage. Cover and chill overnight.
Garnish with parsley before serving.
Number Two (Creamy) coleslaw

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8 cups cabbage, shredded
1/4 cup celery, chopped fine
2 eggs, beaten
2 tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. dry mustard
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
2 tbsp. butter
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 cup whipping cream
Combine cabbage and celery. Set aside.
Mix eggs and sugar in saucepan, blending well. Combine mustard, salt and
pepper to egg mixture. Add butter and slowly stir in vinegar. Cook over low heat until
mixture thickens. Remove from heat and chill.
Add whipping cream to the chilled mixture, stirring well. Pour sauce over
cabbage, toss well. Chill and serve.
Number Three (Vinaigrette) Coleslaw
1 cabbage, shredded
2 green peppers, sliced in rings
1 onion, sliced thin and separated
2 cups vinegar
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup water
1 cup sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Combine cabbage, green pepper and onion in large bowl. Mix well and set
aside.
Combine all remaining ingredients. Stir into cabbage mixture. Cover and chill
overnight.

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Red Cabbage and Sausage
1 head red cabbage, cored and shredded
2 lbs. smoked sausage, diced
2 onions, sliced thin
2 green apples, peeled, cored and diced
2 tbsp. butter
1/3 cup vinegar
1/2 cup chicken stock
1 tsp. curry powder
1/2 tsp. marjoram
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Brown sausage in butter in deep saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and
cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in cabbage, apples, vinegar, stock, curry
powder, marjoram, salt and pepper. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes.
We can't leave this chapter without a great recipe for...
Non-Exploding Sauerkraut
9 cups cabbage, shredded
1/4 cup pickling salt
Wash and shred cabbage. Measure 9 cups into mixing bowl. Mix with pickling
salt. Let stand for 2 hours. Rinse, drain, and rinse again. Pack wet cabbage into
sterilized jars. Pack firmly so that liquid rises and covers cabbage. Leave 1 inch space
at top of jar. Fit a piece of plastic wrap on to top of cabbage so air does not reach it.
Seal jar with lid, but do not tighten--this allows fermentation gases to
escape--eliminates need to "keg poke", and unnecessary explosions!
Store at 68­72F to enhance fermentation process. Check occasionally and
remove any scum that appears on the surface of the cabbage. (Scum won't form if
plastic wrap is tight enough). Fermentation will stop after 2 to 6 weeks.
Sauerkraut is ready when no bubbles appear on the surface and jar does not
hiss when opened. If kraut is too salty for your taste, rinse it before serving. Store
sauerkraut in refrigerator.

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See also: SlowCooked Chicken and Cabbage

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September Fair
Once a month on a Saturday from early Spring until late Autumn, we engage in
a ritual of going into downtown Clareville to visit the Farmer's Market that takes place
in the Town Square. There, midst the tall oaks and maples, between the bandshell and
the fountain, citizens of the area arrive at dawn to exhibit and sell their wares. Tents
and tables litter the greenspace in orderly confusion.
I like to be first and early at the Market. In the near dark morning, Michael and
I sip coffee seated in a window booth at Ivy's Restaurant while the vendors set up. The
dawn chorus of birds vie with a portable radio and good humored neighborly chatter
echoes in the still and frosty air. Chickens cackle in their cages and an irritable rooster
is barking at the morning. The few early birds come to the Market for the fattest worms:
the pick of the best produce--the plumpest peppers, the unblemished tomatoes, bread
still warm from the oven to be sniffed and savored and carried home as prizes. We are
still hunters and gatherers who return triumphant and satisfied from a good forage.
The rest of the flock descends by late morning. By then the Square is full and
frantic. Hands dart here and there, quickly picking goods, making change, filling bags.
Shoulders jostle to the stalls and tables, and jostle away again. Friends meet and chat,
some hug, balancing parcels, blocking the way of others trying to gain access to the
vendor's attention--a pleasant communal irritation.
Some swoop in--if they find a lucky parking spot--raid the essential stalls, list
in hand, and swoop away again. Some come to roost all day. Making their way
systematically from vendor to familiar vendor, chatting, sampling, buying. Stopping to
lunch on thick cut peameal bacon on a kaiser as a special not-on-the-diet treat; or on
quiche and wine at the trendy Stone House Inn; or on toasted club sandwiches at Ivy's
cafe in the park, a temporary fair weather al fresco extension served from her
restaurant across the street. The black-brown and black-blue grackles have landed en
masse on the green and are having their own lively disagreement.
By late afternoon, the hustle and hurry has slowed to a tired and langorous
saunter. Vendors rearrange the last of the unsold wares to show to their best

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advantage, hoping for the last sales to finish the day. Sparrows glean crumbs near the
park benches. Bargains are offered to clear stock that won't keep fresh until next
Market. The late bird may not get the fattest worm, but does get the slimmest prices.
Around dinnertime, on a silent and mysterious signal, everyone heads home like
the starlings who have begun to wheel in unison around the tall oaks and maples.
Trucks pull up to the now-empty curbside to be loaded and the vendor gypsies steal
away into early nightfall with sunburned faces and money in their pockets. There is
hardly any energy left to talk. Good day, someone asks? A smile and nod in reply.
Farewells are just weary waves or nods, and they are gone into the twilight. The green
is empty again. The starlings roost noisily in the tall maples and oaks. Streetlights
come on. As if the whole flighty community had not even been there today.
Pasta and Feta Casserole
1/2 lb. pasta shells
1/2 lb. feta cheese, cubed
1/2 cup grate Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup sliced green olives
1/4 cup diced pimiento
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped fine
1 green pepper, chopped coarsely
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 1/2 cups milk
2 tbsp. tomato paste
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper
2 tbsp. fresh dill
1/2 tsp. oregano
1/4 cup butter
Cook pasta in boiling water. Rinse and drain well.
Melt butter in saucepan. Saute onion, garlic and green pepper until tender. Stir

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in flour. Cook 2 minutes. Add milk, tomato paste, salt and pepper. Bring to boil.
Reduce heat. Simmer 5 minutes, stirring often. Combine pasta with sauce. Add feta,
1/4 cup Parmesan, olives, pimiento, dill and oregano. Transfer to 9"x13" casserole
dish. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan. Bake in preheated oven at 350F for 30
minutes.
Serve with crusty bread and green salad.
Brie en Croute
1 small whole Brie (about 3 pounds)
pastry for 2 crust pie
1 egg white
1 egg yolk beaten with 1 tbsp water.
Preheat oven to 400F.
Roll out bottom crust to fit 9­inch pie pan. Peel thin white paper from Brie. Place
on bottom crust. Cover with top crust. Seal edges. Brush with egg white. Bake 20
minutes. Remove and brush with egg yolk. Bake 15 minutes long until crust is golden.
Serve warm.
Cheese Pastry for Quiche
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
1 cup grated medium or sharp cheddar cheese
2/3 cup lard or vegetable shortening
5 tbsp. cold water
Sift flour and salt together in bowl. Mix cheese into flour mixture. Cut lard or
shortening in with pastry blender or two knives until soft crumbles form. Sprinkle water
over mixture, one teaspoon at a time. Mix lightly with fork. Add only enough water to
keep dough together. Do not over handle. Divide dough in half. Flatten dough on lightly
floured surface and roll out and line 8­9" pieplate. Prick bottom and sides of pastry
with fork. Bake at 450F for 10 to 15 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire rack.

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Blue Cheese Casserole
1 1/2 lb. zucchini (There they are again!)
1 large onion, chopped
1 cup dry bread crumbs
1/2 cup blue cheese, crumbled
1 egg, well beaten
1/3 tsp. marjoram
3 tbsp. butter
Preheat oven to 350F. Grease casserole dish.
Wash and dice zucchini. Combine with chopped onion in saucepan. Cook 7 to
10 minutes or until tender. Drain.
In mixing bowl, toss together zucchini and onions with 3/4 cup bread crumbs,
cheese, egg and marjoram. Spoon into casserole. Top with remaining breadcrumbs
and dot with butter. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes.
Cheese Stuffed Tomatos
6 large, firm tomatoes
1 cup cooked rice
1/2 lb. swiss cheese (2 cups shredded)
2 tbsp. butter
1/2 cup onion, chopped
1/4 cup celery, chopped
1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp. marjoram
1/3 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Preheat oven to 350F. Grease shallow baking dish.
Cut off top 1/4­inch from each tomato and set tops aside. Scoop out pulp from
tomatoes. Drain excess liquid from pulp and set aside.
Heat butter in skillet. Add onion and celery and cook over medium heat until
tender.

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In mixing bowl combine onion and celery with rice, cheese, tomato pulp,
mushrooms, salt, marjoram and pepper. Spoon mixture into tomato shells. Replace
tops. Place in baking dish. Bake for 15 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Serve
immediately.

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It's All Greek To Me
One of our favorite quotes from the movie Zorba the Greek goes, "What I eat I
turn into work and good humor." Whether it's in song, dance or food, Greeks love to
share the joyful spirit. This would be called a joie de vivre but of course that's an
entirely different language, so instead. that phrase having already been taken, it's
called philoxenia.
A friend from the old neighborhood, where we lived before the Quilt Inn days,
came by to stay with us. George Spirodopolous brought Christina, his wife, and little
Georgio (who was at this time, five years older, a foot and a half taller and more
worried about girls since we had last seen him!) It wasn't long before they had
commandeered the Inn kitchen, and several volunteers, to prepare some Greek
specialties for our lucky guests.
The emphasis of Greek food is simple preparation and wholesome ingredients
which make it perfect "country cooking" for The Quilt Inn. And, it is relatively unchanged
since Archestratus wrote the very first cookbook over 2000 years ago. Unfortunately,
it was not a best seller. Since every recipe had to be chiselled on pieces of slate,
("carved in stone" we refer to it today), the book not only took many decades to
complete but weighed more than the average Greek cupboard could hold. Can you
imagine checking it out of the Romus Librarius? "Two days overdue, eh, Spiros? Get
your hernia fixed--you have a date with the lions!")
Two things we discovered about Greek food from George and his family. First,
much of the food is prepared with olive oil, which in today's health conscious eating is
very good because it holds cholesterol levels down. Second, the food keeps extremely
well, not only providing great leftovers but often tasting better the second time around.
Legend has it that Greek food is so aromatically delicious that one can swoon
in ecstasy. Me, I thought it was the amount of garlic in many dishes!
So, George, Christina, and little Georgio wish you bon appetit...no,no, there we
go again...they wish you Kali Orexi!

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Appetizers (mezethes) are meant to be sampled sparingly, with ouzo as an
accompaniment. Michael and I, in the early days of our marriage, used to go to our
favorite Greek restaurant and eat a whole meal just from the appetizer list!
Tzatziki
2 cups plain yogurt
1 cucumber, peeled, chopped fine and drained
5 cloves garlic, crushed
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Combine all ingredients in a non­metallic bowl. Mix well and chill. If you like
Tzatziki thick, drain the yogurt overnight through a cheesecloth. Serve with chunky
bread or rolls.
Saganaki
This is a very rich cheese appetizer. Small quantities go a long way. Cut
chunks of goat cheese or any solid white cheese. There are several excellent Greek
cheese that are best for this dish. Try Kasseri which is a mild Cheddar-like cheese,
or Kefalograviera, which is like Gruyere, or Manouri, an unsalted table cheese.
Dust cheese lightly with flour. Heat a cast iron skillet or griddle to medium heat.
Add butter and fry the cheese until golden brown. Remove pan from heat.
Warm ½ oz. Brandy, pour it over the cheese and light it carefully. Serve with a
flourish! Yell "Opa!", "To your health!"
You can also add slices of black Amphissa olives or sausage just before you
flambe the Saganaki.
Keftedakia
(Our loose translation: meatballs for the gods!)
1/2 lb. ground beef
1/2 lb. ground lamb
1/2 lb. ground pork
1 onion, chopped fine

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4 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2 cup fine bread crumbs
1 egg, lightly beaten
4 tbsp. fresh mint, chopped fine
1/2 tsp. oregano
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
flour
3 tbsp. olive oil
Combine meat, onion, garlic, bread crumbs, egg, mint, oregano, salt and
pepper in bowl. Mix well. Shape into 1 inch balls. Dust lightly with flour. Fry in olive oil
until evenly brown. Serve with toothpicks for party finger food, or with Tzatziki and
bread as an appetizer.
To serve as a main course, form meatballs into large oval sausage-shapes on
skewers. Grill on medium heat until cooked through, about 20 minutes. Serve on a bed
of shredded lettuce, with tomato salsa and thinly sliced onion.
George tells me that the white chef's hat that is customarily worn in most
kitchens of many fine restaurants (including ours), had its origins in Greece. It seems
that the shape is based on Greek monk's hats. Chefs used to seek refuge in the
monasteries to avoid persecution (when one of their recipes really went bad!) In any
event, the different colors made it easy to tell who was a monk and who was a chef,
so that there was no monk-eying around.
Classic Greek Salad
1 cup Feta cheese, crumbled
3 large ripe tomatoes, cut in chunks
1 large cucumber, peeled, cut in chunks
1 small red onion, sliced thin
24 black Amphissa olives, pitted
3 tbsp. olive oil

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1 tsp. oregano
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Combine tomatoes, cucumber, onion, and olives in bowl. Sprinkle with oregano,
salt and pepper. Drizzle with oil and toss. Place in serving bowl or on individual plates.
Sprinkle with Feta cheese.
There are many fine olive oils now available in grocery stores. The important
thing to look for on the label is "extra virgin". This term means the oil was pressed out
of the olives in the original way, manually. This is the best olive oil. You may also
see "pure" olive oil, which means the oil was pressed mechanically or processed with
heat, used to obtain maximum yields, a good oil, but not the best. This is OK, but the
heat erodes the fine subtle flavor and quality of the oil and ideally should not be
used in processing olives.
Try different brands of olive oil, because, unlike plain vegetable oils, they vary
greatly in taste, depending on the kind of olives used, and like wine, also on the type
of soil they grew in. Weather also changes the moisture and ripeness of olives. Many
well-stocked Greek or Italian kitchens will have several different grades and flavors
of olive oil each to be used for specific purposes.
Opa Okra!
2 cups ripe tomatoes, blanched and peeled
1 lb. okra
2 medium onions, chopped fine
3 tbsp. olive oil
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 tsp. sugar
juice of 1 lemon
1/2 cup red wine
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Wash and dry okra. Cut off stems, not exposing seeds. Heat oil in pan. Add

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onion and garlic, saute until lightly brown and fragrant. Stir in okra, tomatoes, parsley,
sugar, lemon juice, wine, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer on low for
30 minutes or until tender. Transfer to serving dish.
As every gardener knows you can never have too many zucchini recipes,
because you can never get rid of all the zucchini that you grow! The Green Thumb
Rule is, "If you grow zucchini, no one leaves the property with less than one basket-
full"!
Zorba's Zucchini
5 large zucchini (give away another 5 immediately)
5 large ripe tomatoes, sliced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 1/2 cups Feta cheese, crumbled
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1/2 cup white wine
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Preheat broiler.
Wash and dry zucchini, slice lengthwise. Brush with oil and place on baking
sheet. Broil until golden brown. Set aside.
Grease shallow casserole. Layer zucchini, tomatoes, onion, Feta, parsley, salt
and pepper, ending with Feta on top. Add wine. Bake at 375F for 30 minutes or until
top is brown and bubbly.
Feta cheese is excellent with almost any green vegetable. The salty, nutty
flavor brings out the best of even commonplace garden vegetables.
Rice Pilaf
1 lb. fresh spinach
1 onion, chopped fine
1 cup long grain rice
1 1/2 cups water

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2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tbsp. dillweed or oregano
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Wash and dry spinach, tear into pieces. Set aside. Heat oil in saucepan. Add
onions, saute until soft. Add rice, saute for 3 minutes. Stir in water, dillweed, salt and
pepper. Bring to a boil, add spinach and stir. Bring to boil, cover and simmer for 30
minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Transfer to serving dish.
If you went to an arts and crafts show in ancient Greece, you would be wiser to
take along your favorite recipes instead of your rendition of "Alexander's Mother".
Cookery was considered the greater of the fine arts because it brought more
consistent pleasure. Sophocles, Aristotle, and the rest were indeed famous
philosophers and teachers, but in ancient Greece, what was the profession of highest
prestige? You're right. The cook. Perhaps if Archimedes, when he said, "Eureka, I
have found it!" while sitting in his bathtub, had invented a decent recipe for Tzatziki,
instead of finding his rubber duckie, he would be even more famous today.
Roast Lamb
6 lb. leg of lamb
6 potatoes, peeled and cut in chunks
6 cloves garlic, chopped
6 tbsp. olive oil
juice of 1 lemon
1 tbsp. oregano
2 cups red wine
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 400F.
Remove excess fat from lamb, wash and dry thoroughly. Score top and bottom,
rub in garlic. Rum lamb with olive oil and place in roasting pan. Squeeze lemon juice
over meat, sprinkle oregano, salt and pepper. Bake for 45 minutes. Reduce heat to

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325F, add wine. Continue roasting 30 minutes per pound. Baste frequently during
roasting.
Add potatoes during last 1½ hours. Transfer to platter for serving. Serve with
Opa Okra, and a full-bodied wine like Castel Danielis or Mount Ambelos.
Gerry Lamb's Soup
3 lbs. lamb, cubed, fat removed
1 large onion, quartered
3 bay leaves
1/2 cup barley
1½ cups onion, chopped fine
1 cup carrots, chopped
1 cup celery, chopped
1 cup potatoes or turnips, chopped
1/3 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 tsp. caraway seeds
Place meat in soup pot, cover with water, bring to a boil, skimming off froth as
it rises. Add onion, bay leaves, salt and pepper, and barley. Bring to boil, reduce heat,
cover and simmer for 1 hour. Add onion, carrots, celery, potatoes, and caraway.
Simmer another hour. Serve with crusty bread and a fine chilled Rose wine like
Rosella.
Lamb Stew With Greek Egg-Lemon Sauce
Because lamb is such a rich meat, the acidity of the spinach in this dish adds
an excellent counterbalance.
3 lbs. lean lamb, cut in cubes
2 large onions, chopped
5 cloves garlic, minced
large bunch fresh spinach
1/4 cup long grain rice
1 cup white wine

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1 cup water
3 tbsp. olive oil
3 tbsp. dillweed
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Trim fat from meat. Heat oil and sear meat until browned. Add onions and
garlic. Saute until tender. Stir in water, wine, dillweed, salt and pepper. Bring to boil.
Simmer, partly covered, for 2 hours, or until meat is tender.
Wash spinach and pat dry with paper towels. Remove stalks. Add spinach and
rice to stew. Stir gently occasionally. Cook for 20 minutes, or until rice is cooked and
liquid is reduced. Reduce heat, but keep stew hot.
Egg­Lemon Sauce
3 eggs
1 tbsp. all purpose flour
juice of 1 lemon
hot stock from stew
Beat eggs lightly in bowl. Sprinkle with flour and continue beating. Add lemon
juice and beat until well blended. Continue beating while slowly pouring in about one
cup hot stock from stew pot until sauce thickens. When completely blended, pour sauce
back into meat and vegetables. Stir gently and heat over low for several minutes,
without boiling (or sauce will curdle). Serve immediately.
Another delicious traditional Greek sauce is this rich sauce, made without
cream, that is excellent on fish or vegetables.
Skordalia
6 cloves garlic, minced
6 slices white bread without crusts
1/2 cup blanched almonds
1/3 cup lemon juice
2/3 cup olive oil
2/3 cup water
Tear bread into large chunks. Place in mixing bowl and sprinkle with water. Set

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aside. Combine garlic and onions in blender until smooth. Add bread, lemon juice,
olive oil and dash salt. Blend until mixture has thick, creamy consistency, thin with water
or thicken with more bread, if necessary. Chill before serving.
To ensure that their fish was fresh, superstitious ancient Greek cooks often set
out in boats lit with lanterns which attracted the fish. These lanterns were also
believed to ward off monsters of the deep, and therefore I suppose we can safely
assume that Greeks invented the first nightlight!
For lighter Greek fare, try these delicious seafood recipes.
Hearty Fish Soup
2 lbs. fish pieces (cod, halibut or red snapper)
1 large onion, chopped
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 ripe sweet green pepper
1/4 cup olive oil
1 cup tomato sauce
3/4 cup water
1 cup white wine
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/2 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. oregano, crushed
2 bay leaves
fresh ground pepper
Saute onion, garlic and sweet pepper in oil until tender. Add tomato sauce,
water, wine, parsley, oregano, thyme, bay leaves and pepper. Cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Add fish and simmer another 15 minutes. Serve in bowls with crusty bread,
and a light dry table wine like Hymettus or St. Helena.
Baked Fish Casserole
2 lbs. fish chunks (cod or snapper will do just for the halibut)

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1 large onion, chopped
6 green onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 sweet green pepper, cut in chunks
3 medium potatoes, scrubbed and cut in chunks
3 zucchini, sliced
3/4 cup olive oil
2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1 bay leaf
1 tbsp. oregano
1 cup water
1/2 cup white wine
2 tbsp. butter
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Saute onions, garlic, green pepper, potatoes and zucchini for 3 minutes, in
small batches. Place vegetables in baking dish or casserole. Sprinkle on parsley, bay
leaf, oregano, salt and pepper. Add water and wine. Bake for 45 minutes uncovered.
Wash fish and pat dry thoroughly with paper towels. Dust with salt and pepper.
Place on top of vegetables. Brush with butter, turn to oven for another 45 minutes,
uncovered. Serve with a full-bodied red wine such as Robola.
Baked Shrimp Au Gratin
1 1/2 lbs. large shrimp
2 tbsp. lemon juice
3 cups tomato sauce
1 1/2 cups feta cheese
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
Preheat oven to 400F.
Peel and devein shrimp. Wash and dry thoroughly. Sprinkle with lemon juice.
Place shrimp in casserole. Cover with tomato sauce. Sprinkle Feta and Parmesan
cheese on top. Bake for 25 minutes or until cheese is bubbly.

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This makes a great appetizer when served in individual ramekins. Serve with
Domestica white wine.
George says that if you visit Greece, you will often see men sitting at outdoor
cafes, sipping quantities of ouzo and playing with their Komboli, or worry beads. I'd
be worried about going home too, with a snootful of ouzo under my chef's hat!
Many Greek pastries are legendary for their rich, honey-drenched sweetness.
So instead, after a hearty Greek meal, we find these light spicy cookies to be an ideal
ending along with fine coffee, and perhaps a little Sambuca.
Greek Spice Cookies
5 cups flour
1 cup butter
1/2 cup icing sugar
1 egg yolk
zest of 1 orange
1 cup orange juice
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. grated nutmeg
1 cup walnuts, chopped fine
Preheat oven to 350F. Combine 3 cups flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt,
cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Cream butter in mixing bowl until fluffy. Gradually add
sugar and egg yolk. Beat in orange zest and juice. Beat in dry ingredients gradually
until stiff dough is formed. Add more flour if dough is sticky. Knead on floured surface.
Drop spoonfuls of dough on ungreased baking sheets. Bake for 30 minutes or
until golden brown. Cool on wire racks.

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Syrup
2 cups liquid honey
1 cup water
1 lemon, sliced
Combine honey, water and lemon in saucepan. Bring to boil. Lower heat and
simmer for 10 minutes. Dip cookies in syrup, remove and place on wire racks. Sprinkle
with chopped walnuts. Cool.
Dr. Galne, a physician in 131 A.D., recommended that honey be used to
stimulate the affairs of the heart. I think this is why baklava is so rich--your heart
goes into overdrive when you bite into this delicious Greek dessert! So, if you have
the time and want to indulge, here you go.
Baklava
Pastry
1 lb. phyllo pastry (available in the frozen dessert section of most
supermarkets)
1 lb. melted butter
Butter a shallow baking pan, or cookie sheet that has 1 inch deep lip all around.
Place one sheet of phyllo on the pan. Brush with melted butter. Add another sheet of
phyllo and brush with butter. Repeat until 6 sheets have been layered and buttered.
Syrup
1 cup liquid honey (for a different flavor, try 1/2 and 1/2 with Buckwheat honey)
2 cups corn syrup
2 thick orange slices
2 thick lemon slices
1 tsp. vanilla
Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Simmer for 15 minutes or until mixture
becomes thin and runny. Do not boil. Squeeze lemon and orange juice into mixture and
discard slices. Let cool before stirring in vanilla. Set aside.

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Filling
1 cup pistachios, chopped
1 cup pecans, chopped
1 cup walnuts, chopped
1 cup almonds, chopped
3 tsp. cinnamon
Mix all nuts in a bowl with cinnamon.
Assemble the Baklava
Preheat oven to 375F. Sprinkle half the nut mixture on the prepared phyllo. Add
six more phyllo layers, brushing each with melted butter. Sprinkle remaining nut mixture
on top layer. Add six more phyllo layers, repeating procedure. Cut into bite-sized
squares or diamonds. Brush top with butter. Bake for 30 minutes. Lower heat to 325F
and bake another 20 minutes or until golden brown.
Remove from oven and pour syrup over pastry slowly, allowing it to sink in. Set
aside at rom temperature for several hours before serving.

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Lionhearts
Orphans are left on doorsteps. In baskets. In secrecy and embarrassment, and
with sad entreaties to take care of the precious bundle inside. Here was another
orphan to look after. At least, that's how it felt when I went to the firehall last night to pick
up a parcel. I wish the firemen would be more open about it and own up to it. There's
certainly nothing to be ashamed about. Not any more. Not these days. A lot of men
have been caught doing it.
When I returned to the Inn, Michael and I carefully opened the plainly wrapped
package and gently lifted out our treasure. A beautiful applique quilt! Yes, our firemen
quilt. On the "q.t." Seven volunteer firemen get together every two weeks to eat pizza,
drink beer, watch a ball game, and...quilt. You just never know what goes on behind
closed doors, do you?
It all started five years ago after the terrible MacPherson fire. Three young
children who should have never been left alone were trapped in the back bedroom of
a rapidly collapsing house. By that strange power of coincidence or Divine intention
that places the right people at the right place when they are needed, Dan, one of the
volunteers, heard the call go out over his car radio. He'd been out that evening to The
Rib House bar and remembered seeing Sam and Jessie MacPherson partying it up
late. He knew that meant the kids were home unattended as usual. Fortunately, he was
only eight blocks away at the time. Unfortunately, he had no equipment with him and the
firehall was on the other side of town. He also knew that the poor wood frame houses
on this side of town were just tinderboxes waiting to go up.
Dan was the first on the scene and without even hesitating, he charged straight
into the burning house. To this day, no one knows, not even Dan, how he found the
children. The house was literally collapsing behind him as he went towards the
bedrooms. Smashing the back window, he pushed two unconscious children to safety.
Although neighbors saw him go in the front, no one was watching the back of the
building. By the time he got the third child to the window and out, both he and the baby
were on fore themselves. Holding the child, and dragging him away from the house, he

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rolled on the ground to put out the fire, and then staggered to the front yard where help
finally saw him.
The burns and glass lacerations put him in the hospital for weeks. His hands
were the most severely damaged. He underwent several more weeks of rehabilitation
therapy. And another person was in the right place at the right time. His therapist nurse
happened to be a quilter and as a part of his hand therapy, she started him quilting to
regain strength in his wrists and mobility in his fingers. He found it to be a soothing form
of necessary exercise and just kept doing it when he returned to work. No one was
going to impugn this hero's masculinity, so it became an accepted, if peculiar, thing
around the firehall.
Slowly, a couple of other guys became curious, then interested and finally
hesitatingly, joined in. Now it's a regular clandestine part of their routine. Burly, gnarled,
scarred, big-knuckled hands around the frame. Add I'm sure their talk must sometimes
make the quilt blush.
Their quilts are usually appliques. Not flowers or gentle little things like ladies
might produce, but strong and bold like you would expect from men with hearts like
lions who face terrible, sudden, and terrifying dangers. Their quilts are full of movement
and life.
The problem became what to do with the finished quilts. Michael and I are
honored to be able to help. You see, when you visit The Quilt Inn, after you pass through
the front door the first thing you see is a quilt hanging from the railing of the landing at
the top of the stairs in the front hall. At the bottom of the stairs, Bruno, an antique
wooden carousel dog picked up at an auction, stands guard. The quilt is on display so
that guests from all around the country can see it and are able to purchase raffle
tickets. Each year, on the anniversary of the fire, Dan draws the winner, who receives
this wonderful gift by special delivery. All the funds are given to the local hospital.
Firemen, perhaps more than anyone in town, know the value of the care for human life
that a community hospital gives.
By the way, the children are fine now. The older boy wants to be a fireman too,
just like the hero who saved his life. And Sam and Jessie MacPherson are much
chastened and at least more attentive parents.

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And, except for the scars, Dan's hands are just fine. So's his heart.
It's tradition around fire halls that the men take turns preparing their `specialty'
meals for the other men. Because they could be called to an emergency at any
minute, their recipes tend to be easy to start, and stop, at any time. The fellas use
convenience items like frozen or canned ingredients. We like to use fresh wherever
possible. The food also keeps well on low heat for prolonged periods of time and can
be quickly reheated. They are hearty and scrumptious too!
Turkey Pot Pie With Fire Captain Herb's Fresh Crust
1/3 cup butter
1/2 lb. mushrooms. chopped
1 cup chicken stock
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk
1/2 tsp. dried thyme
1/4 tsp. Tabasco sauce
4 cups diced cooked turkey
1/4 cup diced pimiento
2 1/2 cups peas and carrots
Melt butter in large saucepan. Add mushrooms. Cook several minutes. Sprinkle
with flour. Cook 5 minutes but do not brown. Whisk in chicken stock and milk. Bring to
a boil. Reduce heat. Add seasonings, salt and pepper. Simmer gently, stirring
occasionally, for 10 minutes. Add turkey, carrots and peas to sauce. Spoon turkey
mixture into a 3 quart buttered casserole dish.
Preheat oven to 400F.
Herb's Crust:
1 cup all purpose flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
1 tbsp. chopped fresh dill

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1/4 tsp. salt
1/3 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
Sift together flour and baking powder, parsley, dill and salt. Cut in 1/3 cup butter
until it forms small lumps. Sprinkle mixture with remaining milk. Roll dough into a ball.
Roll out dough on floured surface to fit top of casserole. Place dough directly on top of
turkey mixture in casserole. Bake 30 to 35 minutes.
Sean's Irish Stew
6 medium potatoes, peeled and cut thick
3 large onions, peeled and cut thick
3 lbs. lean boneless lamb, cubed
3 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
1 tsp. dried thyme
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
water to cover ingredients
Preheat oven to 400F.
Sear lamb cubes in pan to seal juices, remove from pan. Brown onions and
deglaze browning with a little water.
Arrange layers of potatoes, onions and lamb in a large ovenproof casserole,
sprinkling layers with seasonings. Add water to cover. Bake for 2 to 3 hours or until
meat is tender.
Serve with Irish Soda Bread
Irish Soda Bread
1 cup all purpose flour
2 tsp. baking soda
1 1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 cup butter, softened
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 2/3 cups buttermilk

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Preheat oven to 400F and grease loaf pan.
Sift all purpose flour together with baking soda and salt in a large mixing bowl.
Cut in butter with pastry blender, two knives or your fingertips until mixture forms coarse
crumbles. Stir in whole wheat flour, mixing well. Add buttermilk, stirring until ingredients
are thoroughly moistened.
Place dough on floured surface and knead for 5 minutes. Shape dough into
round and place on baking pan. Cut ½ inch deep cross on top of loaf with a sharp knife.
Dust cross with flour. Bake for 40 minutes or until bread sounds hollow when tapped.
Remove and cool on wire rack.
Backdraft Chili
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
2 large onions, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp. chili powder
1 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. oregano
pinch of hot red chili flakes
1/2 lb. lean ground beef
1/2 lb. lean ground pork
1 sweet red pepper, diced
1 sweet green pepper, diced
2 stalks celery, diced
2 tbsp. all purpose flour
1 cup milk
1 tin plum tomatoes, drained
1/4 cup tomato paste
1 tin diced mild green chilies
1 tin red kidney beans, drained
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Heat oil in large skillet. Cook onions and garlic until tender. Add chili powder,

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paprika, oregano, and hot red chili flakes. Cook 1 minute. Add pork and beef. Cook
until meat loses its raw appearance. Drain off excess fat. Stir in red and green pepper,
celery and flour. Cook 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in milk. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover
and cook over low heat for 20 minutes. Add tomatoes, stir in tomato paste, mild chilies
and beans. Cook 10 minutes longer, uncovered, until thick. Season with salt and
pepper.
Serve over rice with sour cream or unflavored yogurt. Garnish with grated
cheese and diced avocado.
Firefighter Chicken Stew
2 medium onions, sliced
1/2 cup carrots, sliced
1/2 cup celery, sliced
3 tbsp. butter
4 lbs. chicken, cut up
1 cup yogurt
1 tbsp. curry powder
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp. turmeric
2 tsp. salt
2 qts. water
In large saucepan, saute onions, carrots and celery in butter until soft. Add
chicken and cook 20 minutes, turning pieces until brown. Stir in yogurt, curry powder,
garlic, turmeric and salt. Cook another 20 minutes on lower heat so as not to burn the
yogurt. Add water, cover and simmer 1 hour or until chicken is tender. Uncover to
thicken stew. Serve over rice.
Dan's Beef Stew
1/2 cup corn starch
2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper

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1/2 tsp. paprika
1 1/2 lbs. lean stewing beef, cubed
3 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups carrots, cubed
5 small potatoes, cubed
4 small onions, quartered
3 stalks celery, sliced
2 cups green beans, sliced
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 pouch dry onion soup mix
1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tsp. gravy browning
1 3/4 cups milk
Preheat oven to 450F.
Combine cornstarch, salt, pepper and paprika. Dust meat cubes with mixture,
reserve remaining mixture. Toss meat cubes with oil in ovenproof casserole. Bake
uncovered 30 minutes, stir occasionally. Add carrots, potatoes, celery, onions and
green beans to meat.
Combine reserved cornstarch mixture with mushroom soup, onion soup mix,
Worcestershire sauce and gravy browning. Gradually stir in milk. Pour over meat and
vegetables. Reduce oven to 350F. Bake, covered, for 1 hour. Remove cover and stir
to combine ingredients. Return to oven, bake covered for 45 minutes or until meat and
vegetables are tender.
Southern Chicken Stew
3 lbs. chicken, cut up
1 tsp. salt
6 potatoes, peeled and quartered
2 cans tomatoes, chopped, with juice
1 onion, chopped

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1 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1 lb. lima beans (frozen will do)
1 lb. whole kernel corn (frozen will do)
Place cutup chicken pieces and salt (*) in large pot with enough water to cover.
Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 45 minutes or until chicken is
cooked through. Remove chicken from broth. Remove meat from bones, cut into small
pieces and set aside.
Add potatoes to broth and cook for 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender.
Mash potatoes in broth for thickening. Re-add chicken, tomatoes, onion, sugar and
pepper. Cook uncovered over medium heat for 45 minutes. Add lima beans and corn
and cook additional 15 minutes or until lima beans are tender.
(*) A Rule of Thumb for cooking meat with or without salt. Salt will draw the
flabor out of the meat and into the broth, so if you want a tasty broth, add salt in
cooking the meat. But if you want tasty meat, do not add salt during the cooking; add
any required salt afterward.
Stovetop Stew
3 lbs. beef, cubed
2 1/2 cup onions, sliced
4 oz. green chilies
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp. fresh ginger, minced
1/4 tsp. curry powder
1 tsp. salt
1 can tomatoes
1 tbsp. cider vinegar
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1 tbsp. chili powder

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1­12 oz. can vegetable juice
2 tbsp. olive oil
Combine vinegar, lemon juice, chili powder and vegetable juice on bowl. Add
meat and marinade up to 1 hour. Stir occasionally.
Heat oil. Saute onions, chilies and garlic over low heat until tender. Add ginger,
curry and salt. Mix well and add tomatoes. Add meat and marinade to pan and simmer
for 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Add water if liquid is necessary.
Serve with steamed rice or in bowls with crusty bread.
Hungry Hungarian Goulash
2 lbs. stewing beef, cubed
1 cup onions, sliced
1 cup celery, sliced
1 cup carrots, sliced
1 cup green peppers, cut in strips
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 tbsp. paprika
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1 bay leaf
3 tbsp. tomato paste
2 cups bouillon or canned beef stock
1/2 cup sour cream
Sear meat in oil in large cast iron pot. Remove meat. In pan juices, saute onion,
garlic, green pepper and celery until tender. Stir in paprika, salt, pepper, bay leaf and
tomato paste. Add bouillon and carrots. Return meat to pan. Bring to boil. Reduce heat
and simmer, covered, for 2 hours or until meat is tender and liquid is thickened.
Traditionally served with buttered noodles. Just before serving, stir in sour
cream.

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Dream Again
It's cold, October, Hallowe'en. In the long field the corn stalks are gold and
crispy. The supple green whooshing of Summer corn has given way to the dry rustlings
of Autumn. The hand of cold wind leaves a moving caress across the field. From the
house I hear children's laughter as they toss and scuffle piles of leaves.
Beyond the vegetable garden we planted a field of corn. For its golden salt and
butter taste, and for the movie Field of Dreams. I walk through the field every Summer
with the tall green stalks brushing against my shoulders and imagine, I, too, hear voices
in the rustling. The voice of my grandmother telling me to remember my dreams.
It's easy to feel lost in the high corn. Ten feet into the field could be a hundred.
The noise of the up close and crowded green myopia obliterates your sense of
direction. You lose your perspective, your vision of distant horizons, in the immediacy.
The first time I wandered into a cornfield I was disoriented. My brother, Bob, and
I were playing tag, crashing around in the obscurring greenery. I suddenly realized I had
lost his voice and noise. He had sneaked away. He was trying to scare me, as older
brothers will do. It worked. I ran in every direction. I yelled. I jumped futilely toward the
blue dome sky for bearings. I cursed Bob. The sun was high and hot overhead. A
buzzing of insects surrounded me. My heart pounded in my ears. Then in the tumult I
heard Grandma's still voice. "Don't be scared," she said. "Think."
"Corn is planted in straight rows, silly," I said to myself. "Follow the row to the
edge of the field."
The panic left me. I didn't know where I was or where the row would lead me but
I knew how to get home. When I emerged I was dusty and a half mile from home. I could
see Grandma standing on the porch waiting. Bob was sitting dejectedly on the step,
in trouble for having abandoned me.
In the end I had walked the long way through the field, but I could finally see
where I was.
Staying on a straight path will ultimately end up somewhere familiar.

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Grandma's Fluffy Cornmeal Muffins
1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup cornmeal
2/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup margarine
1 egg
1 1/4 cup milk
1/3 tsp. salt
3 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. vanilla
Combine sugar, margaine, egg, vanilla and milk in large mixing bowl. Sift flour,
salt, baking powder, cornmeal, nutmeg together. Blend dry ingredients into wet and mix
well. Spoon into large muffin pans. Bake at 350F for 25 minutes or until well done.
Serve with maple syrup, which reminds me....
Here's my best cornmeal story. One year in University a bunch of us students
decided to drive to Florida for spring break. We were six to a car and drove nonstop
to warmer weather. It was early bleary-eyed dawn when we reached Georgia and
stopped for breakfast. One of the fellas saw Cornbread on the recipe and, never
having had it before, decided to try it. "It's delicious," I assured him. "How do you eat
it?" he enquired, as the steaming plate arrived before him. Glancing at the
assortment of condiments on the table, I suggested, "You could put honey or maple
syrup on it." He picked up a glass serving pitcher with amber liquid in it. You know the
kind with the plastic handle and slide back spout. He doused the cornbread and
eagerly picked up his fork. The thought had just crossed my idle mind that the syrup
looked a little watery, but figured they were being cheesey with the tourists, when
Charlie started to gag and spit his mouthful all over. "Blah," he cried to our surprise.
"Don't you like it?" I asked with my mouth full of peaches, as he gulped a glass of ice
water. "That's vinegar!" he exclaimed. "I thought it looked a bit thin," I mumbled. I
wonder if he ever tried cornbread again.

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Grandma's Easy Corn Relish
2 small onions, sliced paper thin
1 cup vinegar
8 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. mustard seed
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. celery seed
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
12­ounce can kernel corn mixed with red and green peppers, drained
1 cup cucumber, diced
1 stalk celery, chopped fine
In medium saucepan, combine onion, vinegar, sugar, mustard seed, salt, celery
seed, and dry mustard. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and cook for 5 minutes. Remove
from heat and stir in canned corn and peppers. Cool. Spoon into jars. Seal and store
in refrigerator or cold cellar.
Corn Fritters
1 cup fresh corn kernels
1/4 cupflour
1/2 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
1 tsp. baking powder
1 egg
Combine corn and egg. Add to dry ingredients in bowl. Drop by spoonfuls in to
bacon fat or nonstick frypan. Fry on medium until golden brown, flip and brown other
side.
Southern Star Hush Puppies
1 cup cornmeal
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp salt

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1 1/3 cup water
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tbsp. margarine
2 tbsp. onion, chopped fine
corn oil
Combine cornmeal, sugar and salt in sacepan. Add water. Cook on low heat
until mixture leaves sides of pan. Remove from heat and add remaining ingredients
(except oil). Cover and chill.
Form into small finger-shaped rolls and fry in hot oil until golden brown. Turn
during cooking. Drain on paper towels before serving hot with fish or seafood.
Colache
3 zucchini
4 ears fresh corn
4 peeled tomatoes
1 large onion, sliced
2 green peppers, cored, seeded and chopped coarsely
2 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. olive oil
2 drops Tabasco sauce
Cut zucchini into rounds and saute in butter and olive oil until slightly browned.
Add onion and green peppers to pan. Saute briefly. Add tomatoes. Cut corn from cob
and add to pan. Add salt and pepper and Tabasco. Cover and cook for ½ hour.
Uncover and simmer another 15 minutes.
Log Cabin Corn Flan
l whole large head garlic
1 tbsp olive oil
1 cup half-and-half cream
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks

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1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1 1/2 cups fresh whole corn kernels
dash Tobasco sauce
Preheat oven to 375F. Remove outer layer of garlic skin. Slice of 1/2­inch of
top stem to expose cloves. Place head, cut side up on baking sheet. Drizzle with oil.
Turn over and roast 30 to 40 minutes or until cloves are soft and golden. Remove and
cool garlic. Remove garlic cloves from head by squeezing bottom and using knifetip
to pull them out. Place cloves in blender. Add eggs, egg yolks, cream, salt, pepper and
dash of Tobasco sauce. Process until blended. Add corn and mix lightly.
Butter baking dish or individual ramekins. Spoon corn mixture into pans and
place in water in roasting pan. Bake 30 to 40 minutes or until set. Remove and cool.
Serve by inverting onto serving plate with green salad.
Lorraine's Summer Corn Tart
l cooked pie crust
2 cups fresh corn kernels
1/2 lb. spicey Italian sausage
1 red pepper, diced
1 green pepper, diced
1 onion, sliced
3 large eggs
1 cup milk
1/4 cup flour
1/4 to 1/2 tsp. Tabasco to taste
1/2 tsp dry mustard
1/2 tsp. salt
Steam corn until tender. Drain and set aside. Remove casing from sausage. In
skillet cook sausage until browned, stirring to break meat into crumbles. Remove
sausage from pan. Saute peppers and onion in sausage dripping until tender. Remove
and set aside.

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Preheat oven to 350F. In large bowl beat eggs, milk, flour, Tobasco, mustard
and salt until well blended. Stir in corn, sausage meat, peppers and onions. Pour
mixture into prepared pie crust. Bake 40 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes
out clean.
Kansas Troubles Two-Corn Pancakes
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup cornmeal
1 cup fresh corn kernels
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup milk
2 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1 large egg
2 large egg whites
oil for frying
Combine flour, cornmeal, corn, baking poweder and salt in mixing bowl. Set
aside.
Beat milk, sugar, oil, vanilla and egg yolk until blended. Stir in flour mixture until
batter is combined. Do not overmix.
Beat egg whites until soft peaks form. Fold egg whites into batter. Lightly oil
griddle or large skillet and heat over medium. Spoon scant 1/4 cup batter onto griddle,
spreading it evenly to 4­inch round. Cook 2 minutes or until bubble form. Lift edge
carefully to check if bottom is golden brown. Flip and cook other side until golden
brown. Remove pancakes. Serve immediately or place on baking sheet in 200F oven
to keep warm until serving.
For breakfast or brunch serve with butter and maple syrup. For dinner, make
pancakes 3­inch round and serve with pats of savory herb butter as side dish.

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Loose Change
One of the things I love about the Inn kitchen is the stone floor. It's awfully cold,
yes. On Winter morning you don't dare set foot on it for fear of frostbite. But it's great
in the Summer because it keeps the kitchen cool even on the hottest days. The floor
is made of large grey stone slabs that are still uneven and rough in places. But a
hundred years of feet working for hours in the kitchen had worn a noticeably smooth
path around the room. We put a big old rough hewn pine harvest table in the middle
and surrounded it with an eclectic mix of old mismatched wood chairs because the
room looked empty without it. I grew up in a family that always gathered around the
kitchen table to talk, and to laugh, and to make decisions, and sometimes even to eat.
So, it's here we gather for "important" talk.
When couples visit the inn, the men will often ramble off doing "guy stuff", leaving
the women to gather informally around the harvest table and gab. Frequently the talk
will turn to quilting and we share our "how I made my first quilt" stories. As I listen, it
sometimes seems as if the spirits of the women who used to live here are shuffling
around the old worn stones, waiting their turn to tell their stories too.
Sally Marie and Cal were a couple who visited the Inn a number of times. Cal
passed away last year. He had a wonderful sense of humor and great comic timing.
We're going to miss him. So, for the first time, Sal is here by herself. She told us her
story.
When Sally Marie got married, a long time ago, she was very young and there
was little money to spend on any "extras" in life. Yet she was proud of the fine young
man she had married. He worked hard and cared for her so completely. And when the
young ones came along he was a strong and patient father no matter how tired he was
at the end of the day. So how could she dare want for more?
Every morning she rose early, long before Calvin woke up and she crept quietly
out of the bedroom to start his breakfast. But one morning, she happened to stop
briefly at the bureau, looked back at the sleeping Cal, and in a moment's inspiration,
she silently scooped up half the pocket change that Cal had left there the night before.

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It was all of fifteen cents. A lot of money in those meagre days. She knew she couldn't
take it all but surely he wouldn't miss just half the change.
Cal said nothing that day, or evening. Sally felt a smug satisfaction that she was
right. He hadn't noticed. So, the next morning she did the same thing again. And the
next. Pretty soon, pennies at a time, she had collected the dollar that she needed. She
bought some fabric and needles and made her first quilt. So that was Sally's "first quilt"
story.
But that was almost fifty years ago. And yet every morning since then, Sally
helped herself to Cal's loose change. Some days there was a lot of change.
Sometimes, when times were tough, there was not. Over the years Sally was able to
provide many little extras for the family--a special dress for the girls or a baseball
glove for the boys. Cal often bragged on Sally to their friends about what a wonderful
housekeeper she was! She could stretch her housekeeping allowance further than
anyone!
Sally's "penny larceny" just became a habit, even after they were comfortably off
financially and she had emancipated access to all their money. There was something
special about taking half of Cal's change every day.
Many years ago, for their twenty fifth wedding anniversary, Sally had her heart
set on a trip to Arizona to see the Grand Canyon. Even though Cal had been laid off
for several months, somehow there always seemed to be lots of change at the end of
the day, to go into Sally's secret fund. Despite the lean times, they were able to make
the once-in-a-lifetime trip.
"You know Cal died last Spring," she said finally, quietly. "I was right there at the
end. He was holding my hand. He looked me right in the eye and said `Sal Gal'. He
always called me `Sal Gal'. He said, `Sal Gal, keep the change!' And he smiled that big
stupid grin of his. That old fox! He knew all along. And he never said a word. Imagine
that!" She shook her head. "All those years, and he never said a word."
Somehow it seems that great love is not in the big important things you say but
in the little things you never say.
Like in a marriage, a little sauce goes a long way. And, it can add a bit of extra

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zip to those otherwise humdrum meals.
Having a number of good sauces up your culinary sleeve enhances your
reputation as a gourmet cook in a very simple and easy way.
White Garlic Sauce
12 cloves garlic, minced
2 lbs. Ricotta or cottage cheese
1/2 cup Parmesan Cheese
1 cup milk
4 tbsp. butter
fresh ground pepper to taste
Heat milk and butter in saucepan. Add garlic and simmer but do not boil for 5
minutes. Add Ricotta cheese and cook over low heat until cheese has melted. Remove
from heat, stir in pepper. Serve over spinach pasta.
Red Garlic Sauce
6 cups plum tomatoes
1 small can tomato paste
16 cloves garlic, minced
4 tbsp. olive oil
2 onions, chopped
4 tbsp. basil, chopped
3 tbsp. oregano, chopped
1/4 cup parsley, chopped
fresh ground pepper to taste
Saute onion and garlic in oil until tender. Add basil, oregano, and parsley. Cook
for 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, tomato paste and pepper. Simmer partly covered for 1
hour. Serve over pasta, plain rice or fish fillets.
Green Garlic Sauce

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1 lb. spinach. chopped fine
1 cup Ricotta or cottage cheese
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese
8 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup milk
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Melt butter in saucepan. Saute garlic until golden. Add spinach and cook for 5
minutes or until limp. Reduce heat, stir in cheeses and milk. Stir while cooking until
cheese melts and mixture is cooked through. Serve over pasta or broiled chicken
breasts.
And to prove that you can do ANYTHING with zucchini...
Zucchini Garlic Sauce
6 zucchini, diced
12­15 cloves garlic, minced
5 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. basil
1 tsp. oregano
1 tsp. thyme
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Heat oil in saucepan. Add garlic and zucchini. Cook on low heat for 5 minutes.
Sprinkle with herbs and continue to cook until zucchini is pulpy. To serve, leave sauce
slightly lumpy or mash it to form paste. Serve over grilled fish.
Horseradish and Sausage Sauce
3/4 lb. Italian sausage, chopped, sauteed and drained
1/3 cup fresh horseradish, grated
1/2 onion, chopped fine
4 tbsp. flour
2 cups chicken stock

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4 tbsp. butter
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 tsp. nutmeg
1 cup whipping cream
dash cayenne pepper
fresh ground pepper to taste
Melt butter and saute onion and garlic until golden. Add flour and mix well. Add
stock and stir until thickened. Add pepper, cayenne, nutmeg and cream and bring just
to a boil. Reduce heat and add horseradish and sausage. Heat through before serving.
Serve over mashed potatoes or steamed vegetables.
Peppery Orange Sauce
1 hot red pepper, chopped
3 green onions, chopped
1/2 cup onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 strip orange peel
1 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. flour
1 cup dry red wine
Saute green onions in saucepan. Add orange peel, garlic, lemon juice, and red
pepper. Stir in flour. Stir in wine. Add 1 cup water and simmer, covered for 45 minutes,
stirring occasionally. Pour over roast lamb 1/2 hour before end of cooking time, or use
as a gravy with broiled lamb chops.
Mustard sauce
1/3 cup Dijon mustard
2 cups heavy cream
1/3 cup vinegar
1/2 cup onion, chopped
10 peppercorns

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1/4 tsp. thyme
2 tbsp. olive oil
Saute onions in saucepan in oil until tender. Stir in peppercorns, vinegar and
thyme and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and stir in cream. Return to heat and cook
until thickened. Remove from heat and discard peppercorns. Stir in mustard, butter and
salt to taste. Serve over pork medallions.
Curry Sauce
1 onion, chopped fine
1 cup tomato sauce
2 cups water
4 tbsp. olive oil
3 tbsp. curry powder
1/4 tsp. salt
1/3 tsp. coriander
1/3 tsp. cumin seed
1/3 tsp. dry mustard
1/3 tsp. ground ginger
1/3 tsp. ground mace
1/3 tsp. ground cloves
In mixing bowl, mix all spices, and add 1/4 cup water, stirring to make thin paste.
In saucepan, saute onions in oil. Add spices to saucepan. Stir constantly to prevent
burning, but allow mixture to turn brown. Add tomato sauce and remaining water. Blend
until smooth. Cover and simmer for 1 hour. Add extra water to thin sauce if necessary.
Serve over plain steamed rice to accompany pork chops.
Hot Wine Sauce
1/2 cup Port wine
1/2 cup red currant jelly
juice of ½ lemon
3 whole cloves

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1 tbsp. butter
1 tbsp. cornstarch
dash cayenne pepper
Combine all ingredients, except Port and cornstarch, in saucepan and simmer
5 minutes. If desired, strain sauce. Add Port and stir 3 or 4 tablespoons of the hot
liquid into the cornstarch to form paste. Gradually add paste back to hot liquid, stirring
constantly, to thicken.
Open Sesame Nutty Butter
2 sticks unsalted butter, softened
1/4 cup sesame seeds, toasted
1/4 cup green onions, chopped fine
2 tbsp. sesame oil
2 tbsp. soya sauce
fresh ground pepper to taste
Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Spoon into individual ramekins or
butter mould and chill until serving. Serve with grilled fish steaks.
Savory Fresh Herb Butter
1 stick unsalted butter, softened
1 tsp. fresh tarragon
1 tsp. fresh thyme
1 tsp. fresh oregano
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
3 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped fine
Combine all ingredients in a blender and process until well blended. Place in
individual ramekins and chill before using as a table butter for warm home made bread
or rolls. Let butter pats melt over steamed vegetables, when serving them "family style"
(one large bowl).
Tangy Orange Butter

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2 sticks unsalted butter, softened
2 tbsp. orange zest, grated
2 tbsp. Cointreau or Grand Marnier
2 tbsp. orange juice
2 tbsp. confectioners' sugar
1/4 tsp. vanilla extract
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
Blend butter, sugar and orange zest in mixing bowl. Slowly beat in liqueur, juice,
vanilla and nutmeg until smooth. Spoon into individual ramekins or butter mould and
chill until serving. Serve with hot breakfast muffins or on pancakes.
English Custard Sauce
(This is an exception to sauces adding flavor. The English have an interesting
custom of adding a bland custard sauce to tasty desserts...?)
1 cup heavy cream
4 egg yolks
1/3 cup sugar
2 tsp. vanilla
Scald cream in saucepan over low heat. Beat egg yolks with sugar until lemon
yellow colored. Add cream to eggs, stirring constantly. Transfer to saucepan and cook,
but do not boil, over medium heat, stirring until thickened. Add vanilla. Serve hot or at
room temperature. (Sauce will form crust as it cools, so cover it tightly with plastic
wrap.) Very nice over strong--flavored berry desserts.
Hot Toddy Rum Sauce
1/4 cup dark rum
1/2 cup butter
1 cup water
1 cup sugar
Heat sugar and water in saucepan until sugar dissolves completely and syrup
thickens slightly. Remove from heat and add butter. Stir in rum. Return to heat briefly

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to heat through. Serve over plum pudding, spumoni ice cream or sliced bananas and
cream.
See also:
Chocolate Fudge Sauce
Orange Butter Sauce
Cranberry Sauce

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Sunday, Sunday
In the town that lies close to the Inn, Sunday always arrives the same way.
Regardless of the weather, the first light of dawn softens the everyday sharp contours
of the empty town streets. If you sleep with your window open and wake early enough,
you can hear the bells ringing from the Church a mile away. There is a different feel to
Sunday mornings, an almost ethereal stillness that allows itself to fold over the area
only once a week. Even the news of the day, whether international, national, or the
homegrown gossip variety, slows to a trickle and people become more reflective.
Sunday is often called the "Sabbath" which derives from the Hebrew word
"shabbat", which means "cessation" or "rest". A lot of people use Sunday to catch up
on their sleep and therefore employ, and enjoy, the literal meaning of the word. In the
Judeo-Christian tradition, Genesis records the first Sabbath as a moment of Divine
inspiration: "So God blessed the seventh day and hallowed it because on it God rested
from all the work He had done in Creation." This is not fatigue but rather the restful
satisfaction of completion.
Yet, the true Sabbath transcends religious differences, and in fact may only be
symbolic of the Sunday frame of mind: Jews and Seventh Day Adventists celebrate
and repose between sunset Friday and sunset Saturday; Muslims on Friday; Buddhists
on Sunday. Even those who don't consider themselves religious have rituals they
observe. Some read the Sunday paper, poring over each item and feature with an
unhurried thoughtfulness. Others go for a stroll in the park and feed the wildlife. Others
visit with family and friends.
At the Inn, we welcome all the diversities, as well as the similarities. One need
only to be seeking good food, pleasant company and respite from one's normal day-to-
day activities to enjoy brunch at The Quilt Inn. It's time they put aside for repose and
renewal. As one of the locals said, "Coming to the Inn every Sunday is like a mental
health day for me!" We're always glad that they do.
Sunday brunch should be a leisurely, special meal. Unlike everyday

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breakfasts where one is hurrying on to other activities, and unlike lunch that is often,
literally, "sandwiched" between appointments, brunch is an in-between sort of time
of day, and should be a time to prepare slightly more elegant dishes, with time given
to savor them.
Brunch should always start with fresh juice. It takes extra time to prepare but
tastes so much better than any pre-packaged kind. If you don't like citrus juices like
orange or grapefruit, try a vegetable juice like spicy tomato, or carrot.
I don't know why all the great, and famous, coffees, seem to originate in
Europe. Perhaps they've learned the art of relaxing and truly savoring their food and
drink. Here are some morning coffee recipes to sip while you read the newspaper or
think about what you're going to do today...
Viennese Coffee
For every cup of coffee, melt 1 oz. semisweet chocolate with 1 tablespoon
heavy cream in the top of a double boiler. Gradually whisk in coffee until frothy. Pour
into large coffee cups. Top with whipped cream and sprinkle with cinnamon or grated
orange zest.
Belgian Coffee
For each cup of coffee fold 1 beaten egg white into 1 tablespoon whipped
cream and put into bottom of coffee cup. Pour in hot coffee until cream floats to
surface. Garnish with cocoa powder.
Cafe Brulot
Combine 5 cinnamon sticks, 3 strips of orange peel and 2 stirps of lemon peel,
with 1 teaspoon allspice and 8 cubes sugar in a chafing dish or skillet. Pour in 1 cup
of Cognac and heat without stirring until the liquid is warm. Light the liquor with a match
and stir until the flames go out. Pour in 6 cups strong hot coffee and stir. Strain and
ladle into coffee cups.

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But for those of you who prefer tea, the English are renowned for their
fussiness when it comes to preparing a "proper cup of char". I lived in England for a
number of years, perhaps long enough for them to convince me that it really does
make a difference in the taste.
A "Proper" Cup of Tea
A really good cup of tea always starts with tea leaves. This has the added
advantage of allowing you a wider choice in the kind of tea you use. Just like wine,
there are mild teas, mellow teas, and really sharp, strong teas, and there are
marvellous flavored teas. Just be sure you always warm the teapot first. Place your tea
leaves loose in the pot--one for each cup of tea, and "one for the pot."
Fill a kettle with fresh water. Never re-boil water for tea. Bring the water to a full
rolling boil and pour into the teapot. Cover for 5 minutes and let it steep.
Pour the tea through a fine mesh strainer into china cups. Tea should always be
served in china cups, serving it in anything else is like serving beer in Styrofoam cups.
Don't worry, china nowadays isn't those delicate flowery little cups your grandmother
had a collection of. There are many modern, and manly, patterns and styles to choose
from.
Tea purists will demand their tea black, with perhaps a pinch of sugar to bring
out the aromatic flavors. But for those who prefer a little milk in their tea, the "rule" is to
pour the milk into the cup first, then add the hot tea. The tea then mixes itself, and
believe me, it tastes different, although their is no scientific reason why this should be
so, that I know of. Just try it. It does improve the taste.
Puff the Magic Pastry and Devilish Crab Puffs
The Pastry
2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter, very cold, cut in pieces
6 tbsp. ice water
1/2 tsp. lemon juice

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Combine flour and salt in mixing bowl. Blend in butter with pastry blender, two
knives, or your fingertips, until mixture is crumbly. Add 4 tablespoons water and the
lemon juice, and mix until just blended. Gather the dough into a loose ball, and turn onto
cool floured surface. Push dough away with heel of hand 1/4 cup at a time. Repeat until
all dough has been smeared. Gather into ball and add more ice water if necessary, just
to make dough that barely holds together. Roll out dough to form 14x7 inch rectangle.
Fold the top third down and the bottom third up with edges touching in the center--your
dough is now 14x3 1/2 inches. Fold in half for a 7x3 1/2 inch rectangle and lightly seal
the fold. Turn the pastry so the folded edges are on your right, and roll out again to form
14x7 inch rectangle. Fold top third down and bottom third up, again, fold in half (you
now have a 7x3 1/2½ rectangle again) and seal. Cover with plastic wrap and place in
freezer for 20 minutes. Fold down top third, fold up bottom third, fold in half, seal, and
return pastry to freezer for additional 20 minutes. (It is the folding and chilling that gives
the pastry a light, puffy texture.)
When ready to use, roll pastry to desired thickness, cut "rounds" with cookie
cutter or knife and use to line small muffin pans.
If you're not using the pastry immediately, store in refrigerator tightly wrapped,
or freeze.
The Crab Puffs
24 small baked puff pastry shells
8 oz. Snow crabmeat
2 tbsp. butter
1 onion, chopped fine
1/2 green pepper, chopped fine
1 stalk celery, chopped fine
1 tsp. curry powder
1 tbsp. dry or Dijon mustard
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp. salt
dash cayenne pepper

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2 tbsp. flour
1/2 cup cream
fresh ground pepper and paprika to taste
Preheat oven to 350F.
Melt butter and saute onion, pepper and celery until tender. Mix in curry powder,
mustard, salt, pepper, and cayenne. Cook gently for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and
add flour and sour cream. Heat while stirring, bringing to a boil and thickening. Add
crab, Worcestershire sauce and paprika. Stir and bring to boil again. Mixture should
have consistency of thick paste.
Spoon mixture into pastry shell and bake until heated through and golden brown.
Serve with fresh garden salad and Russian dressing.
Basic Crepes
3/4 cup all purpose flour
dash salt
3 eggs, beaten
2 tbsp. melted butter
3/4 cup milk or buttermilk
Sift flour and salt together. Add eggs and beat with wire whisk until smooth. Add
butter and mix thoroughly. Add enough milk until batter has consistency of heavy
cream. Let stand 30 minutes, then beat again.
Heat nonstick pan or griddle to medium and brush with butter. Pour in
tablespoon of batter to thinly cover the pan. When crepe browns, loosen and flip.
To serve as a dessert, stuff with fresh fruit and roll up. Add dollops of whipped
cream, a spoonful of fruit preserves, or fresh fruit puree.
To serve as a light lunch, make crepes slightly larger and fill with favorite
stuffing, such as crabmeat or cheese and mushrooms. Serve with chutney and fresh
garden salad.
For savory variations, add a cup fresh parsley, dillweed, or finely chopped
green onion to the basic crepe batter and blend thoroughly.
To serve as a hearty cold weather meal, make 12 crepes dinner plate size.

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Stuffing:
1/2 cup ripe olives, pitted and chopped
1/2 lb. spicy sausage, sliced thin
2 lbs. plum tomatoes, peeled
2 green peppers, seeded and diced fine
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tbsp. olive oil
1/4 tsp. salt
1/3 cup fresh parsley, chopped
dash hot pepper flakes
3/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
Saute garlic, onions and peppers until tender. Add tomatoes and cook 5
minutes, until most of the liquid has evaporated. Add remaining ingredients except
parsley and cheese. Simmer 20 minutes or until thick. Stir in parsley.
Spoon 1/4 cup of mixture and spoonful of cheese onto each crepe. Roll and
transfer to baking sheet. Sprinkle with remaining cheese. Cover with foil and bake at
325F for 10 minutes until cheese is melted and crepes are hot. Uncover and broil until
cheese is golden brown.
Swiss Quiche with Seafood Sauce
1 unbaked pie shell (for recipe, see index) (for variation use Cheese Pastry for
Quiche)
4 egg yolks, lightly beaten
1 1/2 cups light cream
1/4 tsp. salt
1/3 tsp. nutmeg
4 egg whites
1 1/2 cups Swiss cheese, shredded
Preheat oven to 450F.
Bake pie shell until golden brown. Reduce heat to 350F.
Combine egg yolks, cream, salt and nutmeg. Beat egg whites until stiff, fold into

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yolk mixture. Fold in cheese, pour into pie shell. Bake for 45 minutes or until tester
inserted into center of pie comes out clean. Let stand 5 minutes.
Seafood Sauce:
Drain and flake 1 tin crabmeat. Saute in butter. Blend in 2 tablespoons of all
purpose flour and a pinch of salt. Add 1 cup light cream. Cook while stirring until
thickened.
To serve, pour sauce over slices of quiche and garnish with cheery tomatoes
sliced in two. Serve with a smooth and spicy Pinot Noir wine.
Ratatouille
1/2 lbs. fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 eggplant, cut in cubes
2 stalks celery, sliced
1 red pepper, chopped
2 zucchini, sliced
3 green onions, chopped (for garnish)
2 tbsp. sesame seeds, toasted (for garnish)
1/2 tsp. salt
6 tsp. sesame oil
3/4 cup chicken stock
2 tbsp. soy sauce
1 tbsp. dry sherry
1 tsp. cornstarch
2 tsp. garlic, minced
1 tsp. fresh ginger, minced
1 tbsp. fresh coriander, chopped
Preheat oven to 350F.
Sprinkle eggplant with salt and let stand 30 minutes.
Saute celery, onion, and pepper in sesame oil in casserole until tender.
Remove vegetables and set aside. Saute zucchini, mushrooms and eggplant for 5
minutes or until soft. Add the celery, onion and pepper and remove from heat.

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Combine stock, soy sauce, sherry and cornstarch in mixing bowl and blend well.
Stir into vegetable mixture. Cover and bake 40 minutes.
Stir in garlic and ginger. Cover and bake an additional 10 minutes. Stir in
coriander and garnish with green onions and sesame seeds before serving. Serve with
a red Zinfandel wine.
Kedgeree
This is a dish that originated with the the soldiers returning from India in the days
of the Raj and is an exciting brunch specialty.
2 tbsp. butter
1 small onion, chopped fine
2 cups white or mixed wild rice
1/2 tbsp curry powder (or to taste for spiciness)
2 cups water
1/2 tsp. salt
tsp. fresh ground pepper
3 hard cooked eggs, chopped
1/2lb. sliced smoked salmon, cut in strips
1/4 cup lemond juice
1/4 cup chopped parlsey
In large skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion, rice and curry. Saute
5 minutes.
Stir in water, salt and pepper and heat to boiling. Reduce heat. Simmer,
covered, for 15 minutes or until water is absorbed and rice is tender.
Stir in eggs, half the salmon. lemon juice and parsley. Spoon onto warmed
serving platter and top with remaining salmon.
Sunshine Stir Fry Salad
1 lb. boneless sirloin
2 tbsp. olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced

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4 cups mixed fresh salad greens
2 oranges, peeled and segmented
1 red onion, peeled and sliced thin
1/2 cup walnut pieces
Cut beef into thin strips. Heat oil and stir fry beef and garlic for 2 minutes.
Remove with slotted spoon.
Arrange greens on 4 plates. Sprinkle with walnuts, onions and orange
segments. Add beef at the last minute and drizzle with dressing to serve.
Vinaigrette Dressing:
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
4 tbsp. olive oil
4 tbsp. Dijon mustard
4 tbsp. orange or lemon juice
Combine all ingredients and chill until ready to use. Whisk briskly before
serving.
Hearty Quilt Inn Salad
1 lb. spicy smoked farmer's sausage, chopped
1 lb. fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 cup fresh radishes, sliced
1/2 lb. Provolone cheese, cut in strips
1 lb. mixed fresh greens (about 10 cups)
Fry sausage in skillet on high for 5 minutes or until browned. Remove sausage
and drain on paper towels to remove excess fat. Combine sausage, mushrooms,
radishes, cheese and toss with greens.
Quilt Inn Dressing
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
3 tbsp. red wine vinegar
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp. Herbes de Provence (for recipe, see below) or any combination of fresh
savory herbs

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1/3 cup olive oil
1/3 cup sour cream
Whisk all ingredients together until smooth. Toss with salad just before serving.
Herbes de Provence is a blend of equal parts thyme, rosemary, lavender and
Summer savory. Make it yourself or it may be available in specialty food shops or
some supermarkets.
Asparagus Stir Fry
1 lb. asparagus, trimmed and sliced on diagonal
1/2 cup fresh peas
1/2 lb. snow peas
1 sweet red pepper, seeded and sliced
1 sweet yellow pepper, seeded and sliced
1/4 lb. green beans, trimmed and sliced on diagonal
1 carrot, peeled and sliced thin on diagonal
3 green onions, chopped
1/3 cup fresh coriander
2 cups wild rice
2 tbsp. olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp. fresh ginger root, chopped
1/3 cup vinegar
1 tsp. honey
1/2 tsp. salt
3 tbsp. orange juice
1 tsp. sesame oil
Rinse rice and place in saucepan with 2 3/4 cups water. Bring to boil, reduce
heat and cook uncovered until rice is cooked and water is absorbed. Remove from
heat and set aside.
Heat oil in large skillet, or wok. Add carrots, cook 2 minutes. Add green beans,
red pepper, yellow pepper and asparagus. Cook 2 minutes. Add peas. Add snow

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peas. Remove from heat briefly.
Combine vinegar, honey, salt, orange juice and sesame oil. Stir into vegetables
and return to heat. Stir in rice, green onions, and coriander.
Serve immediately, as a side dish with lamb or fish or with pita bread as main
dish. Goes well with a Beaujolais wine.
Sunday Salmon Souffle
4 eggs, separated
1/2 cup heavy cream
4 tbsp. smoked salmon, slivered fine
1 tbsp. fresh chives, chopped fine
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
1 tsp. lemon zest
1 tsp. cornstarch
pinch salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 350F and lightly butter 6 individual ramekins. Coat inside of
ramekin with grated Parmesan cheese and set aside.
Stir together egg yolks, cream, salmon, chives, zest, cornstarch, salt and
pepper in mixing bowl.
In separate bowl, beat egg whites with a few drops of lemon juice until form but
not dry. Fold egg whites into yolk mixture.
Fill ramekins with souffle mixture and place on baking sheet. Bake for 10
minutes or until fluffy and golden. Serve immediately with a salad and Merlot wine.
For a decadent ending to Sunday Brunch or for an afternoon High Tea try
these delicious English scones (or American tea biscuits) with tangy lemon sauce.
Sunday Scones and Lemon Curd
Traditional English Scones:
4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tbsp. sugar

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4 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
2/3 cup butter
1 1/3 cups half-and-half cream
1/4 cup golden raisins
Preheat oven to 425F. Grease large baking sheet.
In large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and cream of tartar.
Using pastry blender or two knives, cut the butter into the dry ingredients until mixture
resembles coarse crumbs.
In small mixing bowl, beat cream and egg together. Measure out 2 tbsp. of
mixture and set aside. Add remaining mixture to dry ingredients along with raisins. Mix
with fork until a soft dough forms. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and knead
gently 5 or 6 times. Divide dough in half. Lightly flour rolling pin and roll dough to 6­inch
diameter round. Cut into 4 wedges. Repeat with remaining dough.
Place scones on baking sheet. Brush tops with reserved egg mixture. Bake for
15 to 18 minutes or until golden brown.
Scottish Scones
1 1/4 cups rolled oats
3 cups all-purpose flour
4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1 tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
2/3 cup vegetable shortening
1/3 cup currants
1 1/3 cups buttermilk
1 tbsp. melted butter
Preheat oven to 425F. Grease large baking sheet. Set aside 2 tbsp. rolled oats.
In large bowl, combine flour, remaining rolled oats, baking powder, sugar, salt

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and baking soda. With pastry blender or 2 knives, cut the shortening in until mixture
resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in currants.
Add buttermilk and mix lightly with fork until soft dough forms. Turn dough onto
lightly floured surface and knead 5 or 6 times. Divide dough in half. With lightly floured
rolling pin, roll dough into 6­inch round. Cut into quarters. Repeat with remaining
dough.
Place scones on baking sheet. Brush tops with melted butter and sprinkle with
reserved rolled oats. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until golden brown.
These contain half the fat and calories as traditional scones but are just as
delicious.
Moist and Healthy Apple Scones
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup oat-bran flake cereal
4 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp. salt
3/4 cup milk
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1 large egg
1 large apple, cored and coarsely chopped
1 tbsp. melted butter
Preheat oven to 425F. Grease large baking sheet.
Combine flour, cereal, baking powder, cinnamon and salt in large mixing bowl.
In another bowl beat together milk, oil, sugar and egg. Add to dry ingredients along with
apple. Mix lightly until soft dough forms.
Prepare dough as above. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with additional
cinnamon if desired. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until golden brown.

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Lemon Curd:
3 large eggs
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter
1 tbsp finely grated lemon rind
1/2 cup lemon juice
In top of double boiler, beat eggs until frothy. Stir in sugar until well mixed. Add
butter and lemon rind and juice.
Place double boiler over simmering water. Cook over medium heat, stirring
constantly until mixture thickens enough to coat spoon (15 to 20 minutes). Pour into
jars. Cool to room temperature. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Keeps up to
1 month.

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Grandma's Quilt Lies on Grandpa's Bed
One of the favorite bedrooms at the Inn is on the third floor. It's one of two large
rooms converted from the attic and has three dormer windows on the East wall. There
are soft white lace curtains and pink-and-green floral chintz-covered pillows resting in
the windowseats. Despite low ceilings with a gambreled roofline, it's a light and airy
spot to sit in the sunlight, sip a morning coffee and watch the world below. Nesting
mourning doves coo sadly in the eaves outside.
I call it the "Granny Room" although by rights it should be the Grandpa and
Grandma room. There's an antique quilt whose white background has yellowed to light
amber, dark green has paled to the color of new grass and "turkey red" has faded to
soft pink. It's been repaired many times, by different hands. Sometimes well and neatly
done, sometimes poorly and unevenly done. It's not a fashionable quilt but it's a
comforting one. It's a quilt your Grandma would have thrown on the back of her rocking
chair or on a daybed on the porch, used but mostly ignored. It lies on an early rustic
bed made with thick ropes that groan as you sink into the deep mattress. The bed is
over a hundred years old and could tell many stories of sleepers and lovers, of births
and deaths and tears, and of the dreams from pioneer homesteaders to present day
homebuilders. It is massive and crude and slightly crooked. The unfinished wood has
been rubbed smooth and dark by years of continued use.
Our pioneer grandfathers, as sturdy young men, carved out homesteads in the
wilderness across the country. They hewed and hauled logs to build homes. They built
barns, drove cattle and ploughshares, and dug wells for life-giving water. They provided
the basic necessities of survival--the "hardware" of walls and roofs and tables--taken
from a land that was hard and sinewy as their own bodies. Grandpa carved the
wooden bed.
The women, as courageous and capable young women, bore and raised the
children that ensured life would continue on the wide land. They made mere food into
a meal, mere fat and lye into soap and candles, mere fabric into curtains, clothes and
quilts that gave warmth and comfort to the family--all by her soft and civilizing hands.

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Grandma stitched the quilt.
The men often worked cooperatively in communal barn-raising. The women
cooperated in quilting bees. We inherited a tradition of working together for the
betterment of all, to provide both the survival and the nurture of every new generation.
Men and women together. Communities together.
Grandma's quilt lies on Grandpa's bed.
Grandma's quilt should always lie on Grandpa's bed.

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A Lifestyle in Provence
We have these wonderful friends, Gail and Gerry, whose goal is to also own an
Inn. Their's will be in the South of France. We hope their dream comes true and in their
honor, we include this set of recipes. It is largely on their tales of France and its beauty
that we draw this inspiration. There is clearly, to those in love with this area, nothing
quite like the country, the people, the smells, and the food of Provence.
When Charles de Montesquieu said, "If I were King I would close all the cafes,
for those who frequent them are dangerous hotheads!" we cannot believe that he was
talking about the gentle people of this area, for they are far too sated (and sotted with
wine) to become hotheads about anything, except perhaps defending the honneur of
French chefs.
Fresh herbs are an important part of Provencal cooking, which also makes it
ideal country Inn fare. It is here that we learned not to cut herbs, but to tear them when
using in recipes. It brings out more flavor and makes your fingers smell great! When
herbs are out of season, use the freshest and the best dried herbs you can find. A
distinctive Herbes de Provence mixture can be created by combining ½ cup each of
thyme, bay leaf, rosemary, summer savory, lavender, cloves and orange zest. Mix them
well and store in an air tight container. And when you serve any of these dishes, try a
chilled rose.
Whatever you serve, remember the words of Jean Anouilh who said, "Everything
in France is a pretext for a good dinner."
Salade Nicoise
4 new potatoes, baked
1 cup green beans, cut lengthwise, cooked and dried
2 ripe plum tomatoes
1/4 cup black and green olives
1 hard boiled egg
1 can tuna fish

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2 tbsp. red onion, chopped
1 tbsp. capers, drained
2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
fresh ground pepper to taste
2 tsp. fresh rosemary, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
salt to taste
lemon wedges
Place tuna in mixing bowl, breaking into chunks. Add onion, capers, 1
tablespoon lemon juice, 2 teaspoons olive oil, and pepper. Toss gently with a fork until
well mixed. Set aside.
Cut potatoes into chunks and place in mixing bowl. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil,
1½ teaspoons lemon juice, rosemary, garlic, pepper and salt. Toss and set aside.
Cut tomatoes into slices and place in bowl. Sprinkle with pepper, salt, and 2
tablespoons parsley. Toss beans with 1 tablespoon lemon juice and 1 teaspoon olive
oil.
To serve, place all ingredients in large shallow bowl or on large platter and
serve with lemon wedges.
Salade Provencale
12 small new potatoes
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1 duckling
1 orange, halved
1/2 lb. garlic Farmers sausage
1 whole garlic head
3/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped

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1/2 cup red onion, chopped fine
1/2 cup black and green olives
1 1/4 cups vinaigrette
1 medium Savoy cabbage
Preheat oven to 400F.
Prick potatoes with fork. Place olive oil in bowl and roll potatoes in oil. Sprinkle
with salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Bake for 1 hour uncovered, turning occasionally.
Remove from heat. Let cool. Cut into chunks. Set aside.
Clean duck, rinse well and pat dry. Prick skin with fork. Rub duck with orange
halves and sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper. Place duck in roasting pan, breast
side up. Roast for 1 hour.
While duck roasts, cook sausages in 2 quarts water in saucepan. Bring to a
boil, reduce heat and simmer for 40 minutes. Remove from water and let cool. Remove
skin and cut into thick rounds. Cut rounds into quarters. Set aside.
Separate garlic cloves. Do not peel. Place in saucepan and cover with water.
Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Drain, allow to cool, and peel.
After duck has cooked, turn it over. Add garlic cloves to pan, cook an additional
10 minutes. Transfer to platter and allow to cool. Remove skin and shred meat into
chunks. Remove garlic cloves from pan and set aside.
Combine potatoes, parsley, red onions and vinaigrette and toss gently. Add 1
teaspoon ground pepper. Add sausages, duck and garlic cloves. Fold all ingredients
together gently. Serve on a bed of cabbage leaves.
Barley Pilaf
1 onion, chopped coarse
2 zucchini, diced coarse
6 cloves garlic, chopped
6 ripe plum tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1 cup cooked pearl barley
1 cup pine nuts, toasted
1/3 cup olive oil

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1 cup fresh basil, chopped
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/2 cup chicken stock
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Heat oil in skillet and saute onion, zucchini and garlic until tender. Add stock and
cook 2 minutes more. Add tomatoes, salt and pepper. Cook 1 minute, stirring
frequently.
Add barley, pine nuts, basil and parsley. Stir well and cook until heated through.
Serve immediately.
Nicoise Shrimp
1 lb. shrimp, cleaned and deveined
1/2 cup olives, pitted
1 leek, washed and chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
3 tbsp. olive oil
1 cup dry white wine
1 tbsp. tomato paste
1/2 cup sun dried tomatoes, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp. Herbes de Provence
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Saute leek and celery in oil over low heat until tender. Stir in wine and tomato
paste and bring to a boil. Stir in shrimp, olives, sun dried tomatoes, garlic and herbs.
Increase heat to medium and cook until shrimp are cooked through. Serve
immediately. Try it with a Pinot Blanc wine.
If you think plain old garden variety green beans are boring, try this...
Haricots Verts Provencal
1 lb. fresh green beans
1 onion, chopped coarsely

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6 cloves garlic, chopped fine
4 tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 tbsp. olive oil
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup pitted olives
1 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. fresh ground pepper
Wash beans and cut ends off. Steam until tender but still crisp. Drain, rinse
under cold water and set aside.
Saute onion and garlic in olive oil for 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and wine and
cook for 20 minutes over medium heat. Toss in the beans and olives and heat
thoroughly. Sprinkle with lemon juice and fresh ground pepper. Serve on a platter with
parsley garnish.
Waldorf Beans
1 lb. fresh green beans
6 strips bacon, cut in chunks
1/2 cup Roquefort cheese, crumbled
1 1/2 cups walnuts, toasted
fresh ground pepper to taste
Steam beans until tender but still crisp. Drain, rinse under cold water and set
aside.
Cook bacon chunks in skillet over medium heat for 5 minutes or until well
cooked. Remove from skillet and drain on paper towels. Remove excess fat from pan
and add green beans to skillet and heat through. Add Roquefort and toss lightly for 1
minute or until cheese just begins to melt. Add walnuts and bacon and sprinkle with
pepper. Serve immediately.
Nicoise Ratatouille
1 lb. zucchini, cubed
3 tomatoes, diced

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2 leeks, washed, dried and cubed
1/2 cup pitted olives
1 eggplant, cubed
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
5 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 cup Pesto (for recipe, see below)
fresh ground pepper to taste
Sprinkle eggplant with salt and set aside 1 hour.
Preheat oven to 350F. Rinse, drain and pat dry with paper towels. Saute leeks
and garlic in olive oil for 5 minutes. Add zucchini and cook another 3 minutes. Stir in
tomatoes, olives, pesto, pepper and eggplant. Transfer to ovenproof dish. Cover and
bake for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Here is a basic all purpose pesto. However, you can substitute the basil with
just about any other herb, even sun dried tomatoes or beans.
Zesto Pesto
4 cloved garlic, minced
2 cups fresh basil, rinsed and dried
1/3 cup olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
Put garlic and basil in blender. Add oil slowly and puree. Put pesto, salt and
pepper in small mixing bowl and refrigerate.
Quiche de Nice, Sans Oeufs (Without Eggs!)
1 pastry pie shell
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
Brush mustard on pie shell, set aside.
Filling:
4 sweet red peppers, cut into slices

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2 tbsp. olive oil
2 onions, chopped
1/2 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
In a large skillet, heat the oil and stir in all the other ingredients. Cook over low
heat for 30 minutes or until soft and thick. Remove with a slotted spoon into pieshell.
Topping:
5 ripe plum tomatoes
1 cup black olives, pitted and sliced
6 cloves garlic, chopped
19 anchovy fillets, rinsed and drained
1 tbsp. olive oil
fresh ground pepper to taste
1 tbsp. thyme leaves
Preheat oven to 375F. Halve tomatoes lengthwise Remove core and seeds.
Cut lengthwise again. Arrange in layers in pieshell, alternating with anchovy fillets.
Sprinkle olives on top. Combine garlic and oil and sprinkle on top. Sprinkle with
pepper and thyme. Bake 30 to 40 minutes or until crust is golden brown and filling is
bubbly. Let stand 10 minutes before serving. Serve with a white Zinfandel wine.
Chicken Provencale
1 4­pound chicken, cut into pieces
1 red onion, sliced thin
2 plum tomatoes, chopped
1/2 cup pitted prunes, chopped
6 cloves garlic, chopped fine
1 tbsp. brown sugar
1 tbsp. oregano
3 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp. olive oil
1/2 tsp. paprika

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1/4 tsp. salt
parsley to garnish
Combine chicken, onion, tomatoes and prunes in shallow dish. Whisk together
garlic, brown sugar, oregano, vinegar, olive oil, paprika and salt to make marinade.
Pour over chicken and stir, coating well. Chill overnight.
Transfer to ovenproof dish. Cover and cook in 350F oven for 40 minutes or until
chicken is thoroughly cooked. Serve over rice or with steamed green beans and
carrots.
South of France Fish Soup
4 cups fish stock (recipe follows)
2 tbsp. tomato paste
1 large can plum tomatoes, peeled and chopped
1/2 tbsp. Pernod
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup fresh fennel bulb, chopped
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Combine the stock, tomatoes, tomato paste, liqueur and garlic in a saucepan
and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes.
Strain the soup and return the liquid to the saucepan. Stir in the fennel and
simmer for 5 minutes or until the fennel is tender. Season with salt and pepper to taste
and serve with croutons.
Fish Stock:
2 tbsp. butter
1 1/2 lbs. fish pieces
3 cups water
2 cups white wine
1/2 tsp. salt
2 leeks, washed well and chopped
3 celery stalks, chopped coarse
3 strips orange rind

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3 strips lemon rind
3 bay leaves
2 tsp. fresh basil, chopped
2 tsp. fresh rosemary, chopped
1 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. fennel seeds
1 tbsp. all purpose flour
Melt butter in saucepan and add leeks, fennel, orange and lemon slices, bay
leaves, herbs and spices. Cook on medium low heat for 1 minute.
Add water, wine, fish and salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for
30 minutes. Strain stock and chill.
And to serve with any Provencal meal...
Olive Bread from Provence
3 to 3 1/2 cups unsifted bread flour
1 package active dry yeast
2 tbsp. sugar
1 cup warm water
1/3 cup pitted, chopped oil­cured ripe olives (black or green)
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tsp. salt
boiling water
Combine 1/2 cup flour, yeast and sugar in large bowl. Add warm water and stir
to blend. Let stand 10 minutes. Add olives, oil, salt, and 2 cups remaining flour. Stir
until well blended.
Turn dough onto lightly floured surface. Knead dough adding remaining flour as
needed until dough is smooth and elastic, (approximately 10 minutes). Place dough
in lightly oiled mixing bowl. Cover with clean cloth. Let rise in warm place until double
in size (about 1 hour).
Lightly oil large baking sheet. Roll dough into 8"x12" oval. Roll edges over 1"
and pinch to seal. Continue all around. Place on baking sheet. Cover with cloth and let

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rise in warm place until double in size. (40 minutes). Preheat oven to 400F. Half fill
roasting pan with water and place on bottom rack in oven. Brush top of bread with
water. Bake on top rack of oven for 35 to 40 minutes or until lightly browned and bread
sounds hollow when tapped. Cool on wire rack.

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Midnight Stars
Most of us these days don't know anything about the natural world around us.
Unlike our pioneer forefathers who knew all the trees and plants, all the animal tracks
and could "dead reckon" by the stars, we are sadly bereft of native, natural wisdom.
And we're intimidated by it. Yet it's easy to recapture our connection to nature.
I started watching the stars long before I knew what any of the constellations
were. Particularly on cold, clear Winter nights. I used to walk along a country road at
midnight and listen to the different crunching noises the frozen snow would make. My
footsteps echoed back from the woods until I would stop, dead still, and listen to the
awesome silence. With no town lights around, I watched the deep black sky and felt
overwhelmed by the millions of points of light whirling in the heavens above. More stars
than grains of sand on a beach. Countless stars. Einstein said, "Not everything that
counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts." He could have
been talking about stars, for all I know.
When I finally started to study the stars and learn their names and the names of
their constellations, I had a problem. I could never "see" or remember the constellations
as they were outlined in the backyard astronomy books I read. But then I realized I
didn't have to. The constellations are really arbitrarily defined groups of stars that only
appear to be related to each other, named thousands of years ago by Greeks and
Romans who are long gone. They named them after what they knew in their
lives--bears, dragons, birds, and the gods they believed were literally in the heavens.
But this is the twentieth century and we have a new sky to live under. So I started
my own constellation naming. When I looked at the Winter night sky years ago and saw
what looked like a big bowtie, I didn't know that it was "really" Orion. And now I don't
care because for me it is the Bowtie Constellation. And as I watched what looked like
two mountain peaks circle the Pole star in the Summer sky, I didn't know it was
Cassiopiea. I called them Cleopatra's bosom. I have a whole catalog of constellations
now. And it's wonderfully comforting to watch "my" stars whirling around the heavens
with the same predictability that reassured the ancient Greeks.

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So, come to the Inn in Winter and bundle up. On cold clear Saturday nights we
brush the snow off the stone patio, set up a telescope, turn off all the lights, and
rediscover the stars, again for the first time! There's something extraordinary and
magical that happens as everyone snuggles into deck chairs to stargaze. Voices drop
instinctively to hushed whispers. As if we were in a hallowed space, and perhaps we
are. Muffled giggles and guffaws come from under sleeping bags and quilts as people
discover and share their own personal cosmology and humor.
We start by rounding up all the star-pattern quilts in the Inn to keep warm in.
There's quite a few because they've always been one of my favorite traditional quilt
themes. Next, everyone receives a pad of paper, a pocket flashlight and black felt pen.
You can make your own star map if you like. Find and name your own constellations.
Reclaim the night sky. Reclaim your connection to nature. All you have to do is be able
to "see" a picture in the "dots" the stars outline, write it down and know its relative
position to the Pole star. Your constellations will circle around the sky during the night
if you stay up late enough, and around the sky as the seasons change. But you can
always find it.
Last year someone renamed my "Cleopatra's Bosom" to "Madonna's Bosom".
After all, it's a new generation! Someone else "found" a `57 Chevy. A chemist found a
molecular structure in Draco. A gardener thought Sagittarius looked more like a
watering can than a teapot.
A psychiatrist would probably have a field day with this, analyzing all the
subliminal transferences and projections we make when we create our own stars. But
who cares? When we name something we make it ours. The poets tell us, "It's written
in the stars." When we write our own stars, do we not write our own destiny as well?
If you want to have your own star naming party, here are some ideas.
Clear the snow away from whatever area you are using. Dig out all the Summer
deck chairs. Line each chair with a sleeping bag or a quilt to keep the cold from
everyone's back. It's really important to keep warm. Sitting outside at night in Winter
can be unpleasantly cold and dampen the party spirits unless you prepare well in
advance. Make sure everyone has a warm hat and mitts to wear. Keep feet warm too.
Provide everyone with a pad of paper to draw on, black felt pens and pocket

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flashlight. Too much light around will obscure the stars. Turn out as many lights as
possible.
Have a telescope or binoculars handy if possible. The moon is extraordinary in
Winter and if someone has never seen it "up close and personal" it can be a moving
experience.
Play theme music, such as "2001: A Space Odyssey", "Star Wars", "The Night
Has a Thousand Eyes", "Moonglow", or others you can think of.
Serve lots of warm food, especially if anyone is planning to watch the stars until
the Morning Star appears! Make the food simple. Finger food is best, that can be
eaten with mitts on, or with mitts removed briefly.
Use your discretion with alcohol. Alcohol shrinks the capillaries and restricts
blood flow so people will feel colder faster when they consume alcohol, even though the
first feeling is of temporary warmth, which could shorten your party. If you serve alcohol,
avoid cold drinks. Serve coffee, or cocoa, lightly "laced" with alcohol, for taste. Or, use
artificial extracts, such as rum, for flavor. It's up to you.
Galileo Punch
3 qts. apple cider
3 cups orange juice
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup sugar
10 cinnamon sticks
1 tbsp. whole cloves
1 tbsp. ground nutmeg
Combine orange and lemon juices, sugar, cinnamon sticks, and nutmeg in large
pot. Cook over medium heat until sugar dissolves and mixture is completely blended
and hot. Add cider and sit well. Strain liquid into warm punch bowl before serving.
Copernicus Crudities
1 lb. green beans
1 cauliflower head, cut into florets

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1 broccoli head, cut into florets
1 lb. carrots, peeled and sliced lengthwise
1 lb. parsnips, peeled and sliced lengthwise
You can vary the quantities depending on the number of guests. Allow
approximately 1/2 pound per person.
Steam vegetables in batches until tender but still crisp. Serve in warmed
casserole or basket lined with towel to keep them warm. Serve with Milky Way Dip
(recipe below) which can be prepared in advance.
Milky Way Dip
First Layer:
6 oz. red kidney beans
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 Jalapeno pepper, cored and seeded
2 tsp. sugar
1/4 cup water
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/4 tsp. chili powder
dash Tabasco sauce
Soak beans overnight in cold water. Drain beans, place in saucepan with new
cold water and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 45 minutes or until tender.
Drain and cool.
Process garlic and Jalapeno in blender. Add beans. Continue to process while
adding water, vinegar, oil and spices. Blend until smooth.
Line bottom of shallow casserole with bean paste.
Second Layer:
Cover paste with 1 1/2 cups guacamole and set aside. (recipe follows)
Avocados have a rich and buttery texture that makes guacamole a very
popular dip. Any crunchy chip, like nachos or tostados, crisp or soft tortillas, as well

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as bread and vegetables, make this a perfect snack. So, here's our recipe for
Guacamole! Ole!
2 ripe avocados, halved and pitted
4 tsp. lemon juice
1 large ripe plum tomato, seeded and chopped
1 tbsp. red onion, chopped
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
dash of Tabasco
Scoop out avocados and mix im bowl with lemon juice. mix in tomato, onion,
salt, pepper, and Tobasco. Serve immediately.
Third Layer:
1 1/2 cups sour cream
1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated
1/2 cup plum tomatoes, seeded and diced fine
1/4 cup black olives, chopped fine
1 tsp. garlic powder
1/4 tsp. chili powder
1/4 tsp. ground cumin
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
salt to taste
Preheat oven to 425F.
Combine sour cream, garlic and chili powders, cumin, salt, and pepper. Blend
well and spread on guacamole. Sprinkle with cheese, tomatoes and olives. Bake for
15 minutes.
Variation: instead of vegetable crudites, serve Milky Way Dip with nachos, or
for a low-sodium healthy alternative serve with...
Big Dippers
8 pita bread or 8 tortilla rounds
1 tbsp. olive oil
Preheat oven to 300F.

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Cut pita or tortillas into 8 wedges. (Split pita triangles along curved edge.) Brush
with oil. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 20 minutes or until golden
and crispy.
Stellar Cheese Puffs
Puffs:
1 3/4 cups all­purpose flour
1 1/2 cups water
1/2 cup butter
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. ground red pepper
6 large eggs
1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
In large saucepan heat water and butter to boiling. Add flour, salt and red
pepper, stirring continuously until thick batter forms. Reduce heat to low and cook 5
minutes or until batter begins to pull away from side of pan. Transfer to blender. Add
eggs and cheese. Process until well blended. Set aside 10 minutes to cool.
Preheat oven to 350F. Lightly grease baking sheets. Drop batter by tablespoon
on greased sheets. Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until puffed and golden brown. Cool on
baking sheet on wire racks.
Filling:
1 onion, chopped
2 tbsp. pine nuts
1 10­ounce package spinach, washed and shredded.
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup milk
3/4 cup water
4 tbsp. butter
3/4 cup dried tomatoes, blanched and chopped
1 1/4 cups provolone cheese, shredded
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper

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1/2 tsp. salt
In large skillet, melt 1 tbsp. butter. Add onion and pine nuts. Saute 5 minutes.
Add spinach. Cover and cook until spinach is wilted (about 2 minutes). Transfer to
mixing bowl and set aside.
Melt remaining butter in skillet. Stir in flour and cook 1 minute. Whisk in milk and
water. Cook, stirring constantly, until mixture forms thick roux. Remove from heat and
stir in tomatoes, 1 cup provolone cheese, pepper, salt and onion mixture.
Just before serving, heat oven to 350F. Cut each pastry in half horizontally.
Spoon filling into bottoms. Replace tops. Sprinkle with remaining provolone. Bake 12
minutes. Serve hot.
Lunar Craters
puff pastry (for recipe, see index) (if using frozen, thawed and rolled into sheet)
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 1/2 tsp. curry powder
1 tsp. ground cummin
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ground cardamon
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup walnut
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 carrot, grated fine
raisins to garnish
Preheat oven to 400F. Lightly grease 2­inch muffin pans. On lightly floured
surface, roll out pastry. Using 2­inch round cookie cutter, cut rounds of pastry. Press
one pastry round into each muffin pan cup. Pierce with fork.
To prepare filling: heat oil in large skillet. Add onion and saute 5 minutes.
Reduce to low heat. Add garlic, curry powder, cumin, cinnamon, cardamon and salt.
Cover and cook 5 minutes. Add spinach and stir until well blended. Cook 2 minutes.
Transfer to blender, add walnuts and process until puree forms.

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Spoon rounded teaspoon of mixture into pastry tarts. Bake 18 ro 20 minutes or
until pastry is golden brown. Cool and remove from pans. Top with grated carrots and
raisins and serve immediately.
Hubble's Heavenly Hot Chocolate
Melt 3 ounces for of a good quality chocolate in top of double boiler. Whisk in
1 cup milk. Bring just to a boil and whisk in 1 beaten egg yolk. Heat thoroughly. Serves
one.
For other easy finger­food party fare, see:
Salsa dishes

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What's My Wine?
It's been a beautiful Summer here at the Inn. This afternoon I was lazing on the
porch reflecting on the abundance of joy and happiness that we have shared with our
guests, friends and general wellwishers, when, much to my delight, I spied an ancient
Citroen huffing it's way up the driveway. The banging of steel on steel accompanied
by noxious exhaust fumes announced the arrival of our local grape-grower and vintner,
Pierre LaBouche, of LaBouche Freres Winery. What a delight to see him!
Pierre brought our order of wine. If you find the Inn temporarily out of your
favorite dinner wine blame it in the vagaries of Pierre's visits. He turns up whenever the
spirit(s) move him.
We carried cases of wine to the cellar where Pierre made his routine inspection
of our wine cellar. We've never made it past a "B-minus" in his rating. Perhaps
because we don't stock enough of his wines! The wine cellar was never intended as
such. In fact, the cellar is only under part of the house, and is really only a root cellar dug
under one side of the Inn. Perhaps it was an afterthought. The rough dirt walls and
massive wood ceiling beams make it an ideal wine cellar, though, with only the
addition of some simple racks.
After opening and sampling a robust red wine ("From the cellars directly to you,
mon ami," Pierre said), he asked if I would like to play a little parlor game with him.
"Let's test your knowledge of wine trivia, my budding sommelier," he said. "And
perhaps the guests of the beautiful Quilt Inn and readers of your upcoming cookbook,
will benefit from this knowledge."
I readily agreed, but not before fortifying myself with some more red. "Let the
game begin!" I exclaimed.
1. True or false? Wines made from grapes have to be aged whereas wines
made from raisins do not.
False. In Italy, vintners dry the harvested grapes until they are raisin­like to
make Vin Santo or Recioto della Amarone. These wines need aging just as wines from
freshly picked grapes do.

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2. Is red wine more fattening than white?
I was prepared to put down my now almost empty glass, but Pierre hastened
to assure me that the calorie content of a wine depends on its alcohol and residual
sugar. A California Chardonnay, for example, at 12.5% alcohol will have more calories
than a Beaujolais at 11%.
"Well, Pierre. Just a touch more. Not as fattening, you know," I said with
anticipation, and no guilt.
3. Michael's birthday arrives soon. How do you open Champagne do avoid the
"pop" and a fountain?
Hold the cork firmly and twist the bottle away from the cork. The cork should not
move. "Here, I'll show you," Pierre said, having retrieved a bottle of Moet from the Inn's
racks. Sure enough, when opened the way he suggested, no pop, no foam, just a light
expression of air, like the sigh you make after tasting your first sip. Which we did.
4. Are all pink wines sweet?
No. Many pink wines, such as rose, are dry, especially those from the Rhone
Valley, such as Tavel and Lirac.
5. The vintage date on a bottle tells you: (a) the birth year of the winemaker's
first child; (b) the winemaker's wedding anniversary, so he won't forget; (c) the year the
grapes were picked and crushed; (d) the year the bottle was made; (e) the year the
wine was bottled.
The answer is (c), although (b) would not be a bad idea!
6. How should you hold a wine glass?
Oh, oh. I could hear another demonstration coming from Pierre, and of course
the glasses needed to be refilled.
"It's just educational, mon ami," he said with a glow (it might have been the
champagne). "Hold a wine glass by the stem or base, not by the bowl. Otherwise, you
will warm a chilled white or cover up the bouquet of a red."
7. True or false? Fill your wine glasses as full as possible, not only to
demonstrate your generosity, but to give a better appreciation of the color of the wine.
False. A wine glass should be filled only to the b level, to allow you to swirl the
wine to produce a concentrated bouquet. (Also, if the glass is too full your nose will get

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wet. I think Jimmy Durante started this tradition.)
8. Pierre swore on his mother's grave that if you sucked a warm Sauterne
through a straw (Sauterne is the sweet white dessert wine from Bordeaux) you could
cure your hiccups. True or false?
Absolutely false. (But if you suck enough wine this way you won't care if you
have the hiccups or not!) And, Pierre's mother is still alive, too!
9. Are dry wines with a sugar count of "0" really dry?
No wine is completely dry. There will always be some unfermented sugar in it.
10. True or false. Alsace is a German wine region.
Well, this question started Pierre and I reminiscing about "The Rocky and
Bullwinkle Show", (thereby disclosing our ages), the episode where our heroes
attempted to save the French wine growing region of "Applesauce Lorraine", so it took
a while to come back to the question. (Boris: "I hate moose!" Natasha: "I know you do,
dollink!")
In any event, for those of you who are still with us, the answer is false. Alsace is
a wine region in Northeastern France, bordering on Germany's Baden region. It's
distinctive green, long-necked bottles resemble those of the German Mosel wines.
11. True or false. Champagne glasses should be placed wet into the freezer,
to frost them so that the wine will remain as cold as possible.
Oh, oh, again. Another champagne question. Sure enough, out came another
bottle, accompanied by frosted glasses. What happened? The wetness kills the
bubbles and makes the champagne go flat.
Which brought us to the discussion of the shape a champagne glass should be.
Pierre asserted that, Hollywood movies aside, champagne should always be served
in a tall slim fluted glass, in order to preserve the bubbles. Mon Dieu, whoever started
serving champagne in those flat-bowled stem glasses should be flogged, he tells me.
The flat bowl lets the bubbles come out faster, which explains why the champagne
served at most wedding receptions is flat by the time it's served to you.
(The tipsiest I remember ever being happened one New Year's Eve, drinking
champagne floats, champagne with vanilla ice cream. If you think cola fizzes when it
hits ice cream, wait until you see champagne fizz!)

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Back to the quiz, albeit unsteadily.
12. How do you pronounce "Reisling"?
Well, I think it has to do with how much you have consumed, but the correct
answer is to say, "Reez-ling".
13. True or false. The longer the cork, the more expensive the wine?
Strangely, true. Longer corks are more expensive and of better quality.
14. Vinho Verde is (a) the color of paint that your wife wants matched exactly
at True Value; (b) a greeting used in Spanish wine bars; (c) one of the Canary Islands;
(d) any Portuguese wine made from green grapes; (e) a light zingy white wine grown
in the Minho region of Portugal; (f) the color of your Dad's `53 Nash Rambler.
The answer is (e), though (f) is probably true, too.
15. What is a Buzbag? (a) slang for too many wine samplings with good friends;
(b) a Spanish wine skin; (c) a Turkish wine made from Okuzgozu grapes; (d) a parasite
that attacks vine roots.
(c). `Nuff said.
16. What are wine diamonds?
Not, as one might expect, a Michelin Guide rating at a restaurant, but rather
potassium bitartrate crystals that precipitate in a wine that has been chilled too quickly.
They are harmless, tasteless and odorless, and in fact are a sign of quality. They show
the wine has not been pasteurized and cold-stabilized, as are less expensive wines.
You can stay at a country inn for your health, or you can stay at an inn to get
away from your healthy regime for a while. Here are some special occasion recipes
with extra spirit! Let's tell it like it is; none of them are particularly good for you. Which
is why we are starting with dessert first. But as Oscar Wilde said, "The only way to get
rid of temptation is to yield to it!"
Amaretto Cheesecake
Crust:
1 cup Graham cracker crumbs

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1/2 cup toasted almonds, chopped fine
2 tbsp. sugar
1/4 cup melted butter
Preheat oven to 450F.
Mix ingredients and press into bottom of 9 inch pie pan. Set aside.
Filling:
4 packages cream cheese
1 cup sugar
3 tbsp. flour
4 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1/4 cup Amaretto di Saronno
Combine cream cheese, sugar and flour, mixing well until blended. Add eggs,
one at a time, mixing until combined. Blend in sour cream and Amaretto.
Pour over crust. Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 250F and bake 1 hour.
Remove from oven, cool on wire rack. Chill.
Glaze:
1/2 cup apricot marmalade (recipe follows)
1 tbsp. Amaretto di Saronno
Combine marmalade and liqueur in saucepan. Heat until warm and smooth.
Strain mixture and pour over cheesecake before serving. Garnish with toasted flaked
almonds.
We love marmalades and jams at the Inn, and our guests do too. In fact, the
next cookbook may be half devoted to preserves and half to desserts! Anyway, here's
a marmalade that is great on the cheescake, but also wonderful on raisin or orange
bread.
Gotta Have Apricot Marmalade
6 oz. dried apricots
1/4 cup plus 2 tbsp. sugar
zest of 1 lemon

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1 cup water
1 tbsp. lemon juice
Put apricots and 1/4 cup sugar in blender, puree until coarse. In saucepan, stir
in puree, 2 tbsp. sugar, zest, water and lemon juice. Heat to boiling, and stir constantly
for 10 minutes. Cool to room temperature, cover and refrigerate.
Creme Brulee
1 can undiluted Condensed milk
3/4 cup fresh brewed coffee
1/4 cup Cognac
2/3 cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/3 tsp. salt
4 eggs
1/4 cup brown sugar
Preheat oven to 350F.
Combine milk, Cognac, and coffee in saucepan. Heat until bubbles form around
edge. Add granulated sugar, vanilla and salt, stirring until sugar dissolves. Beat eggs
well in mixing bowl. Gradually stir in hot milk mixture into eggs. Pour into 4 cup souffle
dish or ovenproof casserole, or individual ramekins. Place dish(es) in pan of hot water
and bake 50 to 60 minutes or until center is set and knifetip inserted in center comes
out clean. Chill until cool.
To serve, sprinkle brown sugar over custard. Place as close as possible under
preheated broiler and broil until sugar melts and browns.
Raspberries in Love Sauce
2 cups raspberries
1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1/4 cup Amaretto di Saronno
Puree raspberries in blender. Add sugar, lemon juice, and Amaretto. Process

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until smooth. Strain to remove seeds if desired. Pour over sponge cake, ice cream or
any other would-be plain and plebian dessert.
Grand Marnier Sauce
1/3 cup Grand Marnier or Cointreau
1 cup whipping cream
3/4 cup sugar
5 egg yolks
1 tbsp. sugar
Beat eggs yolks in double boiler until light and frothy. Beat in sugar and place
in simmering water for 20 minutes, stirring constantly until thickened. Remove from heat
and continue beating until cool. Stir in Grand Marnier and chill.
Whip cream until it begins to thicken. Add 1 tablespoon sugar and beat until
thick but pourable. Fold in egg mixture and chill until ready to serve.
This is a dessert we reserve for extra special guests on extra special
occasions, and is one eagerly awaited.
Over The Top Tiramisu
2 8­oz. packages cream cheese
2 pkg frozen raspberries
1/2 cup sugar
2 egg yolks
1/4 cup brandy
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1 1/2 tsp. vanilla
1 1/2 cups whipping cream
20 ladyfingers or pound cake sliced thinly
1 tbsp. cocoa powder
1/3 cup fresh raspberries
Thaw raspberries in colander, reserving juice. In large mixing bowl beat cream
cheese and sugar. In top of double boiler over hot water, beat egg yolks for 5 minutes

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or until pale and thickened. Beat eggs into cheese mixture. Stir in brandy, lemon juice
and vanilla. Whip 1/2 cup of cream and fold into cheese mixture. Set aside.
Line bottom of trifle dish with ladyfinger halves. Brush with raspberry juice.
Spread with cheese mixture. Sift 1 teaspoon of cocoa powder over top. Sprinkle with
raspberries. Repeat cheese, cocoa and raspberry layers twice more. Circle top of
bowl with ladyfinger halves standing upright over top of bowl. Brush with raspberry
juice. Top with remaining cheese mixture. Sift cocoa powder on top. Cover lightly and
chill overnight.
Whip 1 cup whipped cream. Spoon over tiramisu. Dust with cocoa and garnish
with fresh raspberries and shaved chocolate.
My Dear Madeira Spinach
4 lbs. spinach
1/2 lb. mushrooms, sliced
1/2 cup cream
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup Madeira wine
3 tbsp. butter
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Steam spinach until soft. Drain thoroughly, pat with paper towels until dry.
Process in blender for 1 minute, or chop fine. Drain liquid again. Add butter, nutmeg,
salt, pepper and cream. Set aside, but keep warm.
Saute mushrooms lightly. Add to spinach mixture. Stir in Madeira. Reheat and
serve.

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Fare Weather Friends
More than occasionally we have friends over to the Inn for dinner. This may
seem like bringing coals to Newcastle but our entertaining is easily divided into those
who pay us, and those who repast for free. After all, who can resist a free meal (unless,
of course, it happens to be followed by a time-share pitch or the latest scheme in
multilevel marketing). All we ask is that they bring cheerful conversation, a good
appetite and that they leave behind empty plates (and the good silver).
Dinner guests are strange anomalies of the human spirit. You would expect
them to be charming, appreciative and at least on time. Usually they are the first two,
particularly if you are not trying to impress with a culinary coup de grace: the latest all-
vinegar meal, or a mono-maniacal masterpiece from Southern California. People are
so polite. They won't say to your face that a tarte de seaweed is hardly their idea of an
appetizer, let alone appetizing,or that for the fourth time, the smell of red wine vinegar
precedes you into the dining room. No, they simply won't eat.
Guests do expect your menus to be sensible. We know that if you are
particularly proud of your navigation skills around the kitchen, this may seem like an
imposition. We've all been there. Lemon with everything, (it smells so fresh!), cream
with everything, (it adds a je ne sais quoi), garlic with everything, (at least everyone is
on equal footing thereafter), and the fabulous dessert that is trotted out meal after meal
because everyone thought it was great the first time.
Guests should be met at least halfway. You will not impress with your ability to
turn zucchini into a five-course banquet, or that you know how to recycle the shrimp
from the appetizer into a soup, main course, dessert and sherbet. Nor will it help if you
present them with a theme dinner, (say, an all blue brunch: grape juice, blueberry
cassis, blueberry pancakes, blue ice cream and a blueberry flan).
When you think about your menu, ask yourself these questions: What is in
season? Then don't serve it. Fresh corn is one vegetable I can thick of that everyone
has had their fill of long before they make it to your table, even if you have invented a

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new souffle a la cob. How much time do I have? Then double it or be prepared to
surreptitiously offer the local gourmet store's version of foie gras as your own. What is
the purpose of the dinner--the meal itself, background to a meeting of volunteers for
a community project, romance? Is anyone allergic to anything? Be secure in the fact
that the guest will probably announce their problem well in advance. That way, you can
be sure that it is indeed an allergy and not an aversion to your style of cooking.
Plan a three course meal that is easy to serve with minimal last minute
attention--unless you want to spend the time in the kitchen rather than visiting. (You did
invite these people, remember.) My experience is that down-home country
cooking--soup or salad, meat with vegetables, and dessert--will satisfy and win over
even the most critical guest. In fact, the more pretentious your meal, the more people
feel they must comment on it, (often negatively behind your back). Unless you are a
chef of fame and notoriety, gracefully accept the fact that the meal in all likelihood will
merely be the backdrop to a sensational evening of mirth and conversation. Unless you
serve everything flambed, people will rarely stop talking to stand and salute your
culinary masterpiece. (They may be standing, nervously, to fetch a fire extinguisher.)
Strike a balance in your meals and don't expect your guests to eat as if they've
plowed "the back forty" before sitting down. You can lighten the load by offering a clear
soup or a small salad as an appetizer, avoiding fatty or deep-fried foods and if the
main course does have heft, offer sherbet instead of tiramisu for dessert. Otherwise,
your guests will have to ask for small portions, (insulting to them--like you're implying
they should be on a diet), leave some of the meal hidden under the lettuce or piled in
a small lump in the corner, (insulting to you), feed the dog, (....), or deposit their London
Broil in their neighbor's purse, (insulting, and surprising, to the neighbor). If you're
going over the top on dessert, announce your intention at the beginning of the meal so
guests can adjust their intake (and belts) accordingly.
Don't be to light in your servings, though, because small portions will invariably
demand requests for second helpings (thereby denying the benefits of "light" cooking).
No one wants to be first for seconds. And they cause you as the host to continually jump
up and down out of your chair as if you had a hot seat. Small servings are usually
gazed upon with silence, while the guest asks herself: is this it? Or wonders whether

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such a cuisine meuniere/misere creation should be disturbed.
Serving family-style is best, (all food in bowls on the table, everyone helps
themself). This allows each guest to eye the vittles, estimate the quantity available,
divide by the number of eaters, and take their portion accordingly. It saves face. And,
let's face it, you haven't had your food doled out to you since you left the highchair.
The best conversation comes, in my experience, when there is plenty of food
on the table, being passed around and shared by all.

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Aliske Webb
When The Spirit Moves
I bought the chest at an auction, much to Michael's surprise. When we attend
an auction, we normally tour the goods first and decide what we want to bid on, set a
price and (try to) stick to it.
So call it a whim or an insubordination, or whatever. Michael just shrugged as
I started to bid. (Yeah, like he's never come home with something we didn't agree on.
I have photos. One time he brought back and entire phonebooth! He swears it was a
car phone...but that's another story.)
The chest was an eighteenth century European dowry chest. Probably French
by construction, with Spanish lock and oil portraits on guache, and leather hinges. OK,
so its provenance is questionable. But I'm convinced it was a steal. And if it's a fake
I don't want to know. I've been close to taking it to be appraised several times. I want
to find out that it's worth thousands, just to rub it in. But I don't dare. I call it "Lovejoy",
(named for the British television art seuth.) Michael calls it the "hope-less chest".
It's been living precariously in the second floor hallway opposite the stairs,
beneath an antique quilt. I say precariously because it seems to be trying to move
downstairs. I several times had to shift it back against the wall when I found it stuck out
a foot or so from the wall. At the time I thought nothing of it, assuming someone had
bumped it, or it had been moved in the cleaning. Until it kept happening and one day
I found it clear across the hall at the top of the stairs.
"I know you don't like Lovejoy, but you don't have to push it down the stairs," I
joked to Michael.
"What?"" He looked askance and dubious when I explained.
The next time it moved, it was one quarter over the edge of the stair. "That's it,"
I told Michael. "It's going into one of the guest rooms." I rearranged furniture.
At dinner, Michael said, "I think I heard your ghost thumping around upstairs this
afternoon."
"You could have helped," I pointed out archly.
A week later I was showing guests to their room. The door wouldn't open at first.

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A strong push and Lovejoy slowly inched along the carpet against the back of the door
where it had wandered toward the exit. As the guests viewed the room, I excused
myself and yelled with slight hysteria for Michael. "This has to go downstairs," I
explained to them as Michael came upstairs.
Lovejoy is now living in the downstairs hall and hasn't moved a corpuscle in
months.

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One Man's Feast
Several years ago when I was living in England, a friend very kindly took me on
a countryside tour out of London along the Thames of Wolsey, Moore and Beckett, on
a search for olde worlde pubs. There are still some original centuries-old buildings with
five foot doorways, white-washed wattle and daub walls with foot-thick solid oak beams
(not veneers), and dark smokey interiors. They are pubs of good cheer, crackling
fireplaces, warm beer, and deep ales. Ah, what a time we had.
On that lovely Summer day, we careened merrily along narrow country roads in
his beat up Citroen. Curious that. The English hate the French, except for their cars,
bread and cheeses. As I found out later, the French also hate the English, except for
their woollens. The Channel is much wider than the mere 100 miles across. It's a
wonder they ever got the "Chunnel" to meet in the middle.
We sang encores of pub songs as I tried to catch glimpses of the countryside
over thick hedgerows and stone walls. All of a sudden, I lurched forward against the
dash as the car came to a screeching halt amid a hail of gravel and dust. Dave backed
up a hundred feet and pulled into a farmyard.
"Look," he said. "Bunnies Five Pounds. I'll cook you a delicious rabbit stew for
dinner." And out he leaped and jogged up the farmhouse steps before I could speak.
I sat there converting Pounds into real money (dollars), wondering how much meat
there was on a rabbit anyway and what that worked out to per pound per Pound.
David was involved in an animated and jovial conversation with a woman on the
porch. I saw them smiling as he reached into his pocket for cash. Suddenly the woman
made a loud exclamation of disgust, turned back into the house and slammed the door
in his face. Dave looked both bemused and peeved.
"What on Earth happened?" I asked as he climbed back into the car.
"No. Worse," he laughed. "Apparently she thought I wanted the damn rabbit for
a pet. She was prepared to sell me one. When I asked her if she knew the best way to
skin it, she realized I wanted to eat it and she slammed the door in my face." He
shrugged as we backed slowly out the driveway.

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It would seem that the lesson is: if the sign says, "Rabbits For Sale" you can eat
it, but if it says, "Bunnies For Sale", you can't. Caveat vendor.
Rabbit Reduxed
1 rabbit (2 to 3 lbs.), cut in pieces
1 cup flour
vegetable oil for frying
1 cup onion, chopped fine
1/2 cup celery, chopped
3 tsp. onion powder
3 tsp. paprika
1½ tsp. garlic powder
1 tbsp. fresh ground pepper
1/2 tsp. basil
1/2 tsp. gumbo file powder (optional)
In small bowl combine seasonings together mix with flour in plastic bag.
Dredge rabbit pieces in seasoned flour. Cook rabbit in skillet in hot hoil until golden
brown (2 minutes per side). Remove from skillet, drain on paper towels and set aside.
Pour off all but 1/2 cup of hot oil from skillet. Return to heat. Whisk in remaining
flour mixtureand cook to form roux (2 to 3 minutes). When thickened, stir in onions and
celery and cook until tender. Set aside.
In large saucepan or Dutch oven, bring 6 cups of stock to boil. Add roux to the
stock until completely blended. Add rabbit to pot and cook on high for 5 minutes.
Reduce heat to low and simmer for 1 hour or until rabbit is tender. Serve over rice or
mashed potatoes.

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The Orchard
Workmen arrived this morning and started cutting down trees in the orchard.
The orchard is over a hundred years old and is surrounded in three sides by a neat
stone wall. The wall is three feet high and a foot and a half wide. It is completely free
standing and made without mortar and yet every the stone fits neatly into place. The
wall was made by an itinerant stone mason who traveled around the county building
walls to pay for his supper.
This Spring, we are losing seven trees to old age and blight. They are along the
East wall which is the oldest part of the orchard. It's hard to lose one tree, much less
seven. They are like grandparents, or old members of the community. They were here
before we arrived and we assumed that they would be here forever.
Sometimes, I guess, we ignore their steadfastness until it is threatened, or
gone. But we looked after our trees. Why us? Why are they gone? It feels like
ponderous mortality. Seems like the tree just reaches its full productive maturity, and
then it is gone. Like people. We work and grow and learn all we can to be productive
mature members of our community, then we too, are gone and others take our place.
Tree sentimentality seems to be an attitude I brought from a city childhood.
Perhaps because in the city there are so few trees, and we are so removed from them
and green, growing life. We long for trees like missing relatives and desperately hold
on to the pathetic concrete shrouded survivors on downtown streets. Here in the country
where trees and green life abound there is a different perspective. Rather than a
maudlin sentimentality, there is a simple respect for life, and its ebb and flowing nature.
In the nursery, saplings are thinned to make room for healthy full sized plants. Not every
plant will survive, if they all try to. A fruit tree must be pruned to make healthier growth
next year. In the orchard, an old diseased tree is removed so that it doesn't infect the
others. In the light and space it leaves behind, a new young and vigorous tree is
planted, ensuring another generation will grow up and continue to be a productive
orchard. And the remaining old trees shade the young trees from the heat of Summer
and the cold winds of Winter until they are strong enough to stand alone. The myriad

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leaves fall and rot and refertilize the ground the saplings will grow in. That's the nature
of the orchard. We are all part of that reassuring cycle of nature.
One day, President John Kennedy was conferring with his gardener about a
new tree that was to be planted. Wanting to produce quicker results for the President,
the gardener explained to Kennedy that the species of tree he had chosen was a very
slow growing variety that would not reach maturity for one hundred years. Perhaps he
would like to choose another? But Kennedy's inimitable answer was, "Then we have
no time to lose. The tree must be planted today!"
Michael and I were going to drive into Clareville tomorrow, to Johnson's
Nursery. But I think we'll go this afternoon, instead.
We often think of orchard fruits, like peaches, only as dessert fare. But these
versatile peaches can be delicious ingredients in entire meals, from aperitif to
dessert. Here are some unusual, peachy dishes.
Peach Cocktail
Place a slice of peach in the bottom of a champagne flute. Splash in peach
schnapps and fill with chilled champagne.
"Champagne has the taste of an apple peeled with a steel knife." Aldous
Huxley
"Burgundy makes you think of silly things, Bordeaux makes you talk about
them, and Champagne makes you do them!" Brillat-Savarin
Peach Antipasto
juice of fresh lime
1/2 lb. Prosciutto ham, sliced thin
4 ripe peaches
Peel and pit peaches, cut into slices. Toss with lime juice. Serve on individual
dishes, alternating slices of ham and peach, garnish with parsley.

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Peach Blue Cheese Salad
3 ripe peaches
3 oz. blue cheese*
1/4 cup toasted walnuts, chopped
1/3 cup lime juice
1/4 cup walnut oil
2 tsp. white wine vinegar
1/2 tsp. Dijon mustard
salt and fresh pepper to taste
watercress or shredded lettuce
Whisk lime juice, oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper together in bowl. Peel,
pit, and slice peaches. Add to dressing, toss to coat. Marinate 1 hour.
Arrange watercress or lettuce bed on serving platter or individual plates. Place
peach slices on top, drizzle remaining dressing. Crumble cheese over peaches and
sprinkle with walnuts. serve chilled.
*There are many wonderful blue cheeses on the market these days. Try
different ones until you find the one to your taste, and to suit the purpose. Although
they all have a distinctive flavor, I find French and German blues, such as Bleu de
Bresse, to be milder, creamier and more spreadable, English Stilton is milder and
crumbly, Danish bleu is the saltiest and moderately crumbly. And of course, you can
never go wrong with Italy's Gorgonzola.
Peach Salsa
3 peaches, pitted and diced
1 tbsp. lime juice
1/4 cup sweet red pepper, diced
1 green onion, chopped fine
4 tsp. fresh coriander, chopped fine
1 tbsp. Jalapeno pepper, minced
2 tsp. brown sugar

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1 tsp. vinegar
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Peel, pit and dice peaches and toss with lime juice in bowl. Add red pepper,
green onion, coriander and Jalapeno. Stir sugar, vinegar, salt and pepper together until
sugar is dissolved. Pour over peach mixture and toss. Serve with nachos.
Peach Chutney
25 large ripe peaches, peeled, pitted and diced
6 cups sugar
4 cups cider vinegar
3 tbsp. preserved ginger, chopped
3/4 cups candied citron, chopped
1/4 cup candied lemon, chopped
3 cinnamon sticks
30 whole cloves
3/4 tsp. coriander seed
Prepare fruit and mix with ginger, citron and lemon peel. Tie cinnamon, cloves
and coriander in cloth bag. Make a syrup of the sugar and vinegar. Bring syrup to a
boil. Add fruit and spice bag. Simmer for 10 minutes. Remove spice bag. Pour into
sterilized jars and seal.
Tender Peach Tenderloins
1 1/2 lbs. pork tenderloin
4 fresh peaches, peeled, pitted and halved
1 cup dry white wine
1 cup orange juice
3 tbsp. soy sauce
1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped
2 tsp. fresh ginger, minced
2 tsp. brown sugar
Stir together wine, orange juice, soy sauce, basil and ginger. Add pork, turning

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to coat, cover and marinate 1 hour, turning occasionally. reserve marinade.
Transfer pork to grill and sear for 2 minutes each side. Cover grill and lower
heat (or raise grill). Cook 15 minutes, basting several times with marinade. Turn and
cook thoroughly. Let stand 10 minutes covered with foil before serving.
Brush peach halves with marinade and 10 minutes before tenderloin is cooked,
place on cooler part of grill. Baste 2 or 3 times and turn once. Bring remaining
marinade to boil. Reduce heat, simmer until slightly thickened. Add brown sugar,
simmer 5 minutes. Use as hot sauce with pork.
To serve, place pork on bed of greens and garnish with peach halves.
Peach Pie
1 pie crust
1 lb. peaches, peeled and sliced
1 egg
2 tbsp. flour
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup melted butter
Preheat oven to 400F.
Place peach slices in layers around pie crust.
Combine egg, flour, butter and sugar. Pour mixture over peaches. Bake for 15
minutes at 400F, then reduce to 300F and bake 50 minutes. Serve hot or cold. Garnish
with whipped cream and fresh peach slice.
Stuffed Peaches
6 Freestone peaches, peeled, pitted and halved
2 cups mixed berries (raspberries, blackberries, currants)
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup raisins
2 tbsp. walnuts, chopped
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1/2 cup corn syrup

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cinnamon
Preheat oven to 350F.
Mix berries, walnuts, sugars and lemon juice. Fill each peach half with berry
mixture. Place each peach half in large muffin pan to keep from rolling over, or in
shallow baking dish. Pour corn syrup over peaches. Bake for 1 hour.
Remove from oven. Dust with granulated sugar and cinnamon. Place under
broiler until golden brown. Serve immediately.
See also: Georgia Summer Spritzer
Aunt Ivy's Peach Chutney
Sweet Georgia Jam
Southern Style Barbecue Sauce

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The Storytellers
Inevitably everyone who comes to The Quilt Inn comments on the name and talk
will turn to quilting. I can't think of any other name that would have evoked such feeling
and storytelling as quilting has. Even for those who have never picked up a needle.
Everyone, it seems, has a quilting story to tell. Many are eagerly and proudly told.
Some are reluctant and sadly shared. All are precious memories.
A neatly dressed middle-aged woman recalled quilting with her grandmother
at a local church bee. Grandma was such a perfectionist that after her friends went
home, she would pull out any less-than-perfect stitches and redo them. She never told
her friends she did so. She loved them too much. And she quilted for the
companionship. The woman learned lessons of love from her Grandma.
A young woman with long unruly hair remembered her spinster aunt teaching her
to quilt as a young girl. The little girl accidentally left a knot on the top of the quilt and
wanted to take it out so not to ruin the aunt's quilt. No, the aunt said, leave it in. That
way when I run my fingers over the top and feel the knot, it will remind me of you. The
young woman learned about loving acceptance and the poignancy of memory from her
aunt.
An older woman recalled that her mother worked in a cotton mill during the
Depression. Each night she was given a half yard of new cloth to clean down the
machines. Instead of using the new piece, she kept it and took it home. She used
another old cloth and washed it over and over again, secretly taking it back in to work
with her every day. From all the new pieces of cloth she made clothes for the family,
and wonderful scrap quilts for the less fortunate--at least she had a job to feed her
family. The woman learned about resourcefulness from her mother, and has committed
her life to helping others.
A teacher of remedial reading classes for children took a quilting class at a
local quilt shop. She had never done anything like this before. All the other women in
class seemed better and faster at learning than she was. "This is how my students feel
in normal classrooms," she realized. The teacher learned heartfelt compassion and

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patience from her own awkwardness.
"I don't remember ever seeing my Grandma quilting but I know she did,"
another woman looks inward for memories. "I remember her baking though and
smelling brownies coming from the oven. I'd be in a rocking chair on the porch, reading
Nancy Drew novels, wrapped in a quilt. She would bring out cookies and milk just when
there was not enough daylight left to read and say, `Don't strain your eyes, dear.' That
was our signal. I'd close the book and we'd sit and talk, eat brownies and rock. I don't
know what we talked about. Anything and everything, I guess."
Every story is told the same way, with far off distant looks as the teller relives the
tale. Every story is of women, irrepressible creativity, and love.
Two of the most comforting things in life: a quilt and chocolate. I suppose if
you're on a diet you have to forgo this chapter. Go wrap yourself in a quilt and you'll
feel better....
We have to thank the Aztecs for discovering the coco bean and all its
intoxicating glory. It was considered to be food fit only for the gods and consumed
only by the pivileged, and was tantamount to religious ecstasy. It is also puported to
be an aphrodisiac. Montezuma apparently drank up to 50 cups of it a day.
(Unfortunately the Aztecs also sacrificed virgins by throwing them into deep wells.
What a waste.) The Belgians took chcolate to its decadent heights by moulding it into
decorative shapes. The Swiss, in an effort to keep warm on long snowy nights,
melted it into milk and drank it, or melted in a fondue and dipped everything in the
kitchen into it. The English invented the chocolate candybar itself, and finally the
Americans packaged and marketed it to the masses. Chocolate is now a ten billion
dollar industry annually. Every year, the average per capita consumption of
chocolate is ten pounds! Well, I know I don't eat ten pounds of chocolate every year.
In fact, no one I know does. At least none of us will admit it. So, somewhere there are
a lot of people eating more than their share....
Today we are inundated with cheap and easily available chocolate--in
everything from enticing television ads, to grab-handy candycounters at the grocery

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checkout... everywhere. Chocolate is great (but my all-time favorite flavor is
raspberry) so I only make chocolate for special occasions that way I continue to
appreciate its flavor. When Michael wants to really send me into paroxyms of delight,
he brings me raspberry-filled dark chocolate and I'm putty in his arms.
When I serve chocolate for guests, I want them to stand up and salute it. So
the recipes I look for and use need to be different and unusual and special, like the
ones that follow:
In any of these recipes, here is a handy substitution you can use:
1 square (1 ounce) semisweet chocolate = 3 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder
plus 1 tbsp. vegetable shortening or oil
2 squares (2 ounces) semisweet chocolate = a cup semisweet chocolate chips
This is for sentiment only. I grew up with this magic upside-down cake that
starts with the batter on the bottom but ends up as a cake on top with a velvety gooey
sauce underneath.
Denver Chocolate Pudding
3/4 cup sugar
l cup flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1/3 tsp salt
3 tbsp. butter
1 tbsp. cocoa
1/2 cup milk
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
Sift flour, sugar, baking powder and salt together. Add cocoa and butter. Mix in
milk and vanilla. Pour into buttered baking dish (9'x9"). Over batter scatter, without
mixing: 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/2 cup white sugar, 3 tbsp. cocoa. Pour 1 cup cold water
over top. Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for 40 minute. Remove and let stand before

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serving.
Decorative Chocolate Mousse Cups
6 square semisweet chocolate
l tbsp. vegetable shortening
Melt chcolate and shortening in top of double boiler over hot water. Removed
from heat but keep warm and liquid. Spread thin layer of chocolate over insides of
pleated foil cupcake liners. Chill until firm. Repeat layer of chocolate un desired
thickness. Chill again. Remove outer foil cups carefully. Keep refrigerated until ready
to fill.
For an interesting alternative, instead of foil cupcake liners, use small (clean)
brown paper bags as a "mold" for the chocolate. Brush inside of each bag with light
oil. Use pastry brush to "paint" chocolate to inside of bag. Chill. Repeat until
chocolate is desired thickness. Chill again. Peel away paper bag. And if you are
feeling really adventurous, collect some small sturdy green leaves from the yard,
wash them thoroughly and brush with vegetable oil. Using a pastry brush, brush
chocolate onto each leaf. Chill until firm. Peel off real leaves. Keep chilled until
ready to use as decoration.
Strawberry Mousse Filling:
1­10 oz. package frozen strawberries
l 1/2 envelopes unflavored gelatim
1/4 cup sugar
2 egg whites
1 cup heavy cream
Puree strawberries in blender. Transfer to saucepan. Sprinkle gelatin and 2
tbsp sugar over top. Heat on low, stirring to dissolve gelatin and sugar. Transfer to
chilled bowl. Stir until mixture thickens.
Beat egg whites until foaming. Beat in remaining 2 tbsp sugar until meringue

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forms soft peaks. Beat cream in another bowl until stiff.
Fold whipped cream then meringue into strawberry mixture. Spoon into
chocolate cups. Garnish with shaved chocolate. Chill until serving.
Raspberry Mousse:
1 pint fresh raspberries
1 cup sugar
1 package unflavored gelatin
3 tbsp. cold water
3 tbsp. boiling water
1 tbsp. lemon juice
1 cup whipping cream, whipped
Wash raspberries. Set aside 24 for garnish. Place remaining raspberries and
sugar in blender. Process until smooth. Press mixture through sieve to remove seeds.
Set aside.
Sprinkle gelatin over 3 tbsp. cold water. Stir and let stand 1 minute. Add boiling
water, stirring until gelatin dissolves. Stir in lemon juice. Stir into raspberry mixture. Chill
until slightly thickened. Fold in whipped cream and chill until set. Spoon into chocolate
cups. Garnish with reserved raspberries.
Blueberry Mousse
4 cups blueberries (2 pints)
3/4 cups sugar
2 tbsp. unflavored gelatin
1/3 cup boiling water
3 tbsp. lemon juice
2 cups whipping cream
Puree blueberries in blender until smooth. Place puree in saucepan. Stir in
sugar and cook over low heat for 5 minutes.
Sprinkle gelatin over boiling water and stir to dissolve. Add gelatin and lemon
juice to blueberry mixture. Bring to boil. Remove from heat and transfer to large mixing

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bowl. Let stand 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Chill for 2 hours. Whip cream and fold
into berry mixture. Spoon into chocolate cups and garnish. Chill until served.
Chocolate Mousse Filling:
1/3 cup hot coffee
6 squares semisweet chocolate
4 egg yolks
2 tbsp. creme de cacao liqueur
4 egg yolks
Whip Cream
Combine coffee and chocolate in blender until smooth. Add egg yolks and
liqueur and blend until thick and smooth.
Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold chocolate mixture into egg whites. Spoon into
chcolate cups. Garnish with whip cream and chopped nuts. Chill until serving.
One of the best reasons to make a souffle is to show off your dexterity in
achieving the fluffy "crown" over the top of the serving dish...
Easy Chocolate Souffle
5 squares semisweet chocolate
1/4 cup rum (or fresh orange juice)
2 envelopes unflavored gelatin
2/3 cup milk
5 eggs, separated
2/3 cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
icing sugar
Sprinkle gelatin over rum and let stand 10 minutes. Melt chocolate with milk in
double boiler over hot water. Heat and stir until smooth. Remove from heat. Add gelatin
and stir until dissolved and mixed thoroughly. Pour into mixing bowl.
Put egg yolks and sugar in double boiler (no need to wash it out). Beat unti very

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thick and creamy over hot water. Remove from heat and let cool.
Combine vanilla, cooked chocolate, and egg yolks. Chill for 1 hour or until
partially set.
Cut wax paper long enough to fit around and overlap souffle or straight sided
baking dish. Fold lengthwise and butter side that will be against souffle. Tie wax paper
around dish to form 2­inch "collar" above edge of dish.
Whip cream. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold whipped cream, then egg whites
into chocolate mixture. Pour mixture into dish. Chill overnight. Carefully remove wax
paper collar before serving. Garnish with icing sugar and shaved chocolate.
Chocolate Eggnog Pie
4 squares semisweet chocolate
1/3 cup milk
2 tbsp. sugar
3 ounces cream cheese
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp. rum
4 ounches whipped cream
1/4 cu toasted slivered almonds
1 graham cracker crust (for recipe, see index)
Heat chocolate and 2 tbsp milk in saucepan over low heat, stirring until smooth.
Beat sugar into cream cheese. Add egg yolks and blend well. Add chocolate mixture,
rum and remaining milk. Beat until smooth.
Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into chocolate mixture. Fold in whipped cream.
Blend well. Spoon into piecrust. Chill until firm. Garnish with additional whipped cream
and almonds.
Chocolate Tortilla Torte
12 squares semisweet chocolate
3 cups sour cream
10 8­inch tortillas (for recipe, see index)

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1/4 cup confectioner's sugar
shaved chocolate, chopped walnuts and fresh strawberries for garnish
Melt chocolate in top of double boiler over hot water until smooth. Stir in 2 cups
sour cream. Chill.
Mix remaining sour cream and sugar in small mixing bowl. Place tortilla on cake
platter. Layer chocolate mixture with tortillas. Top with finala tortilla and then sour cream
and sugar mixture. Cover and chill overnight. Garnish before serving.
Chocolate Fettucini with Orange Sauce
1 cup durum wheat semolina
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 tbsp instant chocolate milk powder
1 tsp. cocoa
pinch salt
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tsp. vegetable oil
Sift dry ingredients together. Gradually mix in egg and oil, adding water if
necessary to form a dry but well-mixed dough. Knead dough on lightly floured board for
6 minutes until it has a smooth and elastic texture. Let stand 15 minutes.
Divide dough in two. Roll each piece into thin rectangular sheet. Let sit for a few
minutes before cutting. Cut sheets into fettucini width strips with pasta machine or roll
up each sheet and slice of ribbons with sharp knife. Can be prepared well in advance.
Keep moist if not using immediately.
Cook pasta in boiling water.
Orange Butter Sauce:
1 large orange
1/3 lb. unsalted butter
Cut rind into quarters. Peel rind from one quarter. Remove inner pith. Slice rind
paper­thin. Grate zest off rest of orange.
In small saucepan heat butter until it browns slightly. Add orange rind and zest.
Heat gently for 2 to 3 minutes until rind gives off aroma.

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Drain cooked pasta. Pour sauce over it and toss lightly. Serve immediately with
whipped cream or mascarpone (Italian cream cheese).
Chocolate Hazelnut Torte
6 eggs, separated
1 tbsp. orange peel, shredded fine
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp cream of tartar
3 cups hazelnuts, ground fine
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup chilled whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
1/4 cup cocoa
2 tsp. orange peel, shredded fine
1/2 cup hazelnuts, chopped for decoration
Preheat oven to 325F. Grease bottom of round baking pan and line with wax
paper.
Beat egg yolks, 1 tbsp. orange peel and cinnamon in medium mixing bowl until
thick and light colored (about 5 minutes). Gradually beat in 1/2 cup sugar. Set aside.
Beat egg whites and cream of tartar in large mixing bowl until peaks form.
Gradually beat in 1/2 cup sugar until stiff peaks form. Fold egg mixture into meringue.
Mix 3 cups ground hazelnuts with flour. Sprinkle a of hazelnut mixture over
meringue and fold in. Repeat until all hazelnut mixture has been folded in. Spread in
baking pan. Bake 55 to 60 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out
clean. Cool on wire rack. Loosen side of cake with spatula. Remove cake from pan.
Cool completely. Wrap and refrigerate for 4 hours.
Prepare Frosting:
1/2 cup margarine or butter
3 squares unsweetened chocolate, melted
3 cups powdered sugar

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1 tbsp. brandy
2 tsp. vanilla
3 tbsp. milk
Beat butter or margarine and chocolate. Beat in remaining ingredients until
mixture is smooth and easy to spread. Set aside.
Beat whipping cream, powdered sugar and cocoa until stiff. Fold in 2 tsp.
orange peel. Carefully split cake horizontally to form three layers. (The easiest way to
do this is to take a long piece of sturdy thread. Place it around the cake one third from
the top. Cross the loose ends of thread and pull. The threads will cut the cake evenly
and cleanly. Brilliant idea, right?) Place bottom layer on cake serving platter. Spread
with half of the whipped cream mixture. Add second layer of cake. Spread with half of
the whipped cream mixture. Top with remaining cake layer. Frost sides and top of torte
with frosting mixture.(Use cake decorating bag to make rosettes on top, if desired)
Press 1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts around side. Chill overnight.
Chocolate Crepes
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
3 tbsp. cocoa
2 tbsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
2 cups milk
2 tbsp. butter or margarine, melted
1/2 tsp. vanilla
2 eggs
Mix flour, cocoa, sugar, baking powder and salt. Stir in remaining ingredients.
Beat until smooth.
Generously butter, or use non­stick skillet and heat over medium heat. Pour
scant 1/4 cup of batter into skillet. Rotate skillet until very thin film covers bottom. Cook
briefly until surface begins to dry. Loosen with spatula and flip. Cook other side.
Remove and stack crepes with wax paper between. Keep covered until used.

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Variation: add 1 tsp. finely grated orange rind to mixture.
Crepes can be frozen or made into...
Decorative Chocolate Crepe Cups
Place each crepe on 8­inch square of heavy-duty aluminium foil. Trim foil to
make circles the same size as the crepe. Shape foil and crepe together to form cup
by turning up 2­inch edge and form wavey flutes. Place on ungreased baking sheet
and bake at 350F until crisp (about 15 minutes). Cool and remove foil. Use as
decorative and edible cup or bowl for mousse.
Variation: before removing outer foil, brush with melted chocolate (see
Decorative Chocolate Mousse Cups recipe above) and chill.
Chocolate Poppyseed Pastries
Cream Cheese Pastry Dough:
1 cup unsalted butter, softened
1/4 cup sugar
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
4 oz. cream cheese, softened (low-fat works fine)
1 egg yolk
1/2 tsp. baking powder.
Beat butter, cream cheese and sugar until well mixed. Add egg yolk and beat
well. Gradually beat in 2½ cups flour and baking powder until smooth dough forms. Add
extra flour if necessary until dough is no longer sticky. Cover and chill for 1 hour.
Filling:
1 cup poppy seeds
3/4 cup milk
1/3 cup sugar
3 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. cocoa powder
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 square semisweet chocoate

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1 tsp. vanilla
Combine poppy seeds, milk, sugar, butter, cocoa and cinnamon in saucepan.
Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, for 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in
chocolate and vanilla until smooth. Cool and set aside.
Egg Glaze:
1 large egg
1 tbsp. water
Beat egg and water until well mixed.
Preheat oven to 350F. Lightly grease baking sheets.
On floured surface, roll pastry dough to 1/3­inch thickness. cut into 3­inch
squares. Reroll trimmings and cut more squares. Place 2 tsp. filling in center of each
square. Brush glazeonto pastry around filling. Fold opposite corner over center,
forming triangle, and press to seal. Place on baking sheets 1 inch apart. Bake 20
minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire racks.
One of our earliest gardening years produced an exuberance of zucchini. In our
ignorance we proudly thought we'd done something right. A seasoned gardening
neighbor tactfully pointed out that the zucchinis did it all themselves, and that any old
fool can grow tons of them. Using them up takes genius, and dedication. Michael is,
after all, a choco-holic, so...
Michael's Chocolate Zucchini Cake
2 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup sour cream
2 cups zucchini, shredded
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips
1/4 cup cocoa
1 cup nuts
1 cup margarine
1 tsp. baking soda

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1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla
Beat sugar, margarine, vanilla and eggs together in large mixing bowl. Addflour,
sour cream, cocoa, baking soda, salt and beat for 1 minute until smooth and well
blended. Fold in zucchini, chocolate chips and nuts. Spoon into 9"x13" pan. Bake at
350F for 35 to 45 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.

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Canned Laughter
Once month a television crew from the local station, KORN-TV, arrives at the
Inn, accompanied by "Aunts" Ivy and Millie, who are local media celebrities. They like
to use our library to tape some of their TV programs. The library has wide-plank wood
floors, tartan-patterned wallpaper and one whole wall of book shelves. Over the
fireplace are framed eighteenth century hunting scenes. There's a leather sofa and
plaid wingback chairs with good reading lights that are comfortable enough to invite
you to curl up with a good book, but straight enough to keep you from falling asleep. It's
a very masculine-looking, "lord of the manor" sort of room which makes an interesting
backdrop for these two grey haired ladies' "fireside chats."
Aunt Ivy and Aunt Millie are good friends who have agreed to disagree on
everything. If one likes hot weather, the other prefers cold. If one votes liberal, the other
votes conservative. If one is logical, the other is chaotic. If there are two sides to
anything, these two will find them. And they've made a name for themselves by playing
"point-counterpoint" on their program.
"Canning" TV shows always reminds me of my Grama and the crock of pickles
she inevitably had aging in the "Summer kitchen" out back, and the jars of jams and
relishes that were lined up on an old hutch.
Michael and I both grew up in a climate that had short Summers, followed by
what seemed to be an interminably long, cold and snowy Winter. Therefore, the
growing season was short, and the depths of January were always brightened by
savoring the fruits and vegetables which had been carefully nurtured in June, July and
August. So, we don't mind the heat when it comes. We like to say that we are storing
it up for the Winter, the better to melt the snowdrifts that stand between us and our
dormant garden.
Here at The Quilt Inn, the seasonal swing is not as pronounced, but it still calls
for "putting up" fruits and vegetables, the better to remember the Summer growing
season. There are other reasons as well. What you prepare at home and serve has
less salt and sugar, and relies more on the natural tastes and textures than does "store

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bought". The natural flavors, especially of jams and sweet preserves, are usually more
satisfying, so a little goes a long way.
At The Quilt Inn, in the orchard, you see peach, plum, and pear trees, a single
nectarine and an apricot. Apple trees with many varieties are there too. There is also
a farm garden, which produces abundant quantities of beans, cucumbers, fresh herbs,
tomatoes, the ubiquitous zucchini, corn, squashes, and more. We have raspberries,
strawberries and blackberries. And we can pick wild blueberries down the path by the
barn.
Here are some of our favorite "canned sunshine" recipes.
Michael's Fuzzy Navel Jam
5 cups ripe peaches
2 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. grated orange rind
3 1/2 cups sugar
1 box fruit pectin
1/3 tsp. butter
1/4 cup peach Schnapps
Peel and pit peaches. Grind or finely chop. Place 5 cups prepared fruit in
saucepan. Add lemon juice and orange rind. Mix pectin crystal with 1/4 cup of sugar.
Blend well. Slowly add fruit pectin mixture to prepared fruit in saucepan.
Place over high heat and stir constantly until mixture comes to a boil. Add
remaining sugar. Continue to stir and boil hard for 1 minute. Mixture should thicken.
Remove from heat, stir in peach Schnapps. Skim off foam. Pour into sterilized jars and
cover with new lids. Store opened jam in refrigerator.
Aunt Ivy's Peach Chutney
4 lbs. Freestone peaches, peeled and chopped
1 cup seedless raisins
2 cloves garlic, minced
3/4 cup onion, chopped

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1/3 cup drained chopped ginger
1 tbsp. chili powder
1 tbsp. mustard seed
1 tsp. salt
4 tbsp. mixed pickling spice
2 1/2 cups cider vinegar
1 1/2 lbs. brown sugar
Tie pickling spice in cheesecloth bag. Place in large bowl or crock with other
ingredients. Cover, let stand 24 hours.
Turn mixture into heavy kettle, bring to boil and simmer uncovered for 45
minutes or until chutney is thick, stirring occasionally. Remove spice bag. Ladle mixture
into sterilized jars and seal. Store in a cool, dark place.
Strawberry Daiquiri Jam
1 cup prepared ripe strawberries
2/3 cup unsweetened pineapple juice
1/3 cup lime juice
3 cups sugar
1 pouch liquid fruit pectin (½ bottle)
4 tbsp. dark rum
Clean and hull strawberries. Crush. Place 1 cup berries in glass bowl. Add
pineapple, lime and sugar. Bring mixture to a full boil for 1 minute. Add liquid fruit
pectin and rum. Stir and skim for 5 minutes. Let cool slightly to prevent fruit from
floating to the top. Pour into sterilized jars. Cover with new lids or hot paraffin.
Raspberry Orange Jam
2 cups fresh raspberries
1 orange
4 cups sugar
2 tbsp. lemon juice
1 (3 ounches) pouch liquid Certo

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Crush berries lightly with fork and place in mixing bowl. Grate peel from orange.
Chop orange segment to yield 1/4 cup. Stir into berries along with grated peel and
sugar. Let stand 10 minutes.
Stir in lemon juice and Certo. Stir until sugar is dissolved (about 3 minutes).
Pour into sterilized jars and seal. Let stand at room temperature for 24 hours Store in
refrigerator. Keeps up to one month.
Peach Relish
2 cups finely chopped fresh peaches
3 3/4 cups sugar
1/2 cup white vinegar
2 tbsp. dry mustard
2 tbsp. onion, grated
1 pouch liquid fruit pectin (1/2 bottle)
Combine fruit sugar, vinegar, mustard and onion in large saucepan. Cook and
stir over high heat until mixture comes to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring
constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in liquid pectin. Skim off foam. Stir and skim for 5
minutes while cooling slightly. Pour into sterilized jars, deal with new lids or hot paraffin.
Sweet Georgia Jam
5 lbs. peaches
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 cup pure maple syrup
2 tsp. cinnamon
Blanch peaches in boiling water to loosen skins. Drain, cool and peel. Pit and
chop finely.
Combine peaches, lemon juice, maple syrup and cinnamon in non-aluminum
pot. Bring to a boil and gently cook for 10 minutes or until thick. Test by dropping onto
cool plate--jam should hold its shape if cooked.
Remove from heat. Skim off foam. Ladle into sterilized jars and seal. This is
delicious served with pancakes or crepes.

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Easy Anyberry Jam
The great thing about his jam is that it tastes different every time depending
on the quantities of the berries you have on hand, so from one recipe comes several
delicious flavors...
4 qts. fresh raspberries, blackberries, strawberries or any combination
3 tart apples, finely chopped
1 cup honey
2 tbsp. lemon juice
Crush some of the berries in a large kettle. Add remaining berries and other
ingredients. Bring to a boil and cook for 30 minutes or until mixture thickens, stirring
frequently. Remove from heat, skim off any foam. Pour into sterilized jars and seal.
Apricot Brandy Conserve
2 1/2 cups apricots, pitted and chopped
2 tbsp. lemon juice
3 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 box fruit pectin
1/4 cup brandy
Pit but do not peel apricots. Add lemon juice. Mix fruit with pectin in saucepan.
Bring to boil. Stir in sugar and continue boiling for 30 minutes. Skim off any foam. Stir
in brandy. Remove from heat. Stir and skim for 5 minutes as jam cools. Pour into
sterilized jars and seal.
Strawberries in Love
5 1/2 cups strawberries, washed and hulled
4 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 pouch liquid fruit pectin (1/2 bottle)
2/3 cup Amaretto di Saronna liqueur
Wash berries and mix with sugar and lemon juice in large kettle. Bring to boil,

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stir in pectin. Continue boiling 25 to 30 minutes. Test for setting by dropping on a cool
plate. Jam should keep its shape if cooked. Remove from heat, skim foam from top
while cooling to prevent fruit from floating to the surface. Stir in liqueur. Pour into
sterilized jars and seal.
Savory Jelly
This is excellent served with turkey or baked ham.
2 cups dry white wine
3 cups sugar
2 tbsp. tarragon flavored vinegar
2 tsp. dried tarragon leaves, chopped fine
1 pouch liquid fruit pectin (1/2 bottle)
Combine wine, sugar and vinegar in saucepan. Add tarragon leaves. Bring to
full boil and boil for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in pectin. Strain
mixture through a fine sieve to remove leaves, if desired. Pour into sterilized jars and
seal.
Watermelon Pickles
half a medium watermelon
5 cups sugar
2 cups vinegar
1 cup water
1 lemon, sliced
1 tbsp. whole cloves
1 tbsp. whole allspice
1 tbsp. ginger
l cinnamon stick
Discard (eat) pink flesh of watermelon. Remove outer green skin. Cut fleshy rind
into 1­inch pieces. Should make 5 cups rind. Soak overnight in salt water (2 tbsp. salt
to 1 quart water). Drain.
Cover with water and simmer until tender (about 30 minutes). Drain.

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Combine sugar, vinegar, water and lemon. Tie cloves, allspice, ginger and
cinnamon stick in cloth bag. Add to liquid, boil and stir 5 minutes. Add rind, cook and
stir until transparent (about 45 minutes). Ladle into sterilized jars and seal.

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Songs From the Hearth
I have a copy of The Woman's Exchange Cook Book by Mrs. Minnie Palmer,
published in 1901 by the W.B. Conkey Company of Chicago. It's been in our family for
a long time. I think it was my great-grandmother's. Now, before you think it is valuable
or something let me tell you this is a very beat up copy. In fact, the original cover was
lost years ago and as long as I can remember it's been held together by the very
beaten up cover of another (lost) book called, Heart Songs. As a little girl I misread the
tile and always thought it said "Hearth Songs". Somehow that seemed appropriate. A
cookbook would contain songs from the hearth. Isn't that what Shakespeare was
alluding to when he wrote, "If music be the food of love..."?
Unlike Elena Molokhovets' book about pre-Revolutionary aristocratic excesses,
Mrs. Palmer's book is a plain, down-to-earth anthology of everything a North American
homemaker at the turn of the century needed to know. It included everything from
dressing game, to preserving food, to baking pies and making ice cream delicacies.
For extra value in the over 500 pages, there are chapters on cooking for an invalid,
how to run a nursery, how to make soap, perfumes and cosmetics, and remedies for
common ailments, my favorite. So, before we become too nostalgic for the good old
days, here are some of the invaluable (and sometimes unbelievable) cures you might
want to try.
To Stop Bleeding
"Apply wet tea leaves, or scrapings of sole leather to a fresh cut and it will stop
bleeding, or apply a paste of flour and vinegar."
To Stop Bleeding at the Nose
"Bathe the feet in very hot water, drinking at the same time a pint of cayenne
pepper tea, or hold both hands above the head."
Toothache
"The worst toothache, or neuralgia coming from the teeth, may be speedily and
delightfully ended by the application of a bit of clean cotton saturated in a solution of

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ammonia to the defective tooth. Sometimes the late sufferer is prompted to momentary
laughter by the application, but the pain will disappear." (Try suggesting this to your
dentist!)
Relief From Asthma
"Sufferers from asthma should get a muskrat skin and wear it over their lungs
with the fur side next to the body. Or, soak blotting paper in saltpeter water, then dry,
burning at night in the patient's bedroom."
Earache
"Take a bit of cotton batting, put it upon a pinch of black pepper, gather it up and
tie it, dip in sweet oil and insert into the heat, put a flannel bandage over the head to
keep it warm. It will give immediate relief."
Cough Syrup
"Syrup of squills 4 ounces, syrup of tolu 4 ounces, tincture of bloodroot 1½
ounces, camphorated tincture of opium 4 ounces. Mix." (I wonder where you can find
squills these days?)
When I think of a hearth I always think of the smell of warm loaves of bread
baking. But don't be intimidated, thinking you can't make bread. You can!
It's important to refrigerate your yeast to keep it fresh, and use before the
expiation date on the package. It must be dissolved in water before it is added to the
flour. A key element in making a yeast bread is the gluten. This is achieved by
mixing and kneading the dough (and who doesn't knead more dough?) You knead,
sorry, need to feel some elasticity in the dough and it should shine a bit, too. Some
of our recipes have different flours in them for flavor sensation, but you cannot use
these special flours alone. They have very little gluten to contribute to the bread (No
thanks, I gave at the flour mill). Anyway, that's why all yeast breads use a greater
proportion of all purpose flour or bread flour in relation to any other ingredients.
Another point. Your relationship with bread dough is not very fulfilling. It needs
time but doesn't need you. Mix the dough and go shopping. Come back and punch
it down and visit a neighbor. If it's rising too fast, put it in the refrigerator and it will slow

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down. (Wouldn't you?) Take it out later and it will continue to rise. Heat kills yeast, not
cold. And that's why the ingredients are cold and the kitchen should be cool.
Country Inn Brown Oat Bread
4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups rolled oats
2 cups boiling water
3/4 cup molasses
1 tsp. sugar
2 tsp. salt
1 tbsp. shortening
1 package granulated yeast
1/2 cup warm water
Lightly grease two loaf pans. Stir oats and salt into boiling water. Add
shortening. Combine yeast, sugar and warm water. Let stand 10 minutes. Add
molasses to oatmeal mixture, then enough flout to make stiff dough. Add yeast mixture
and mix well. Let rise until light and double in size. Punch down and split into 2 loaf
pans. Let rise again.
Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for 45 minutes. Remove from oven and brush with
butter. Cool on wire rack.
Fresh Herb Bread
2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 cup cottage cheese, creamed
1 egg, beaten
2 tbsp. sugar
1/4 cup warm water
1 tbsp. onion, minced
2 tsp. caraway, dill or rosemary seeds
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. soda

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1 tbsp. butter
1 package granulated yeast
Lightly grease an ovenproof casserole dish.
Heat cottage cheese in saucepan until lukewarm. Soften yeast in warm water.
In large mixing bowl, combine in order cheese, sugar, onion, butter, caraway, salt,
soda, egg and yeast. Add enough flour to make stiff dough. Cover and let rise until
double in size. Punch down and turn into casserole. Let rise again.
Preheat oven to 350F. Bake for 40 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from
oven, brush with butter and serve warm.
Fresh Herb Soda Bread
2 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups all purpose flour
2 cups buttermilk
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tbsp. salt
3 tbsp. butter
1/2 tsp. sage
1/2 tsp. basil
1/2 tsp. thyme
1/2 tsp. chives
1/2 tsp. marjoram
Lightly grease a baking sheet.
Sift dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Cut in butter until mixture forms
crumbles. Stir in herbs. Stir in buttermilk and form the dough into a ball. Knead dough
lightly on floured surface until smooth.
Preheat oven to 375F. Transfer dough to baking sheet and form a rough loaf.
Bake 40 minutes or until loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Cool on wire rack and serve
warm.

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English Ale Bread
3 cups self-rising flour
1/4 cup sugar
12 oz. strong English ale
1 tsp. grated orange rind
Preheat oven to 350F and lightly grease loafpan.
Mix flour and sugar together thoroughly. Add orange rind. Stir in ale until batter
is formed. Place in loaf pan and bake for 1 hour or until golden brown.
Greek Braid Bread
3 1/2 cups sifted all purpose flour
3 tbsp. sugar
2 eggs, beaten
3/4 cup milk, at room temperature
1/4 cup warm water
1/4 cup butter, softened
1/4 tsp. salt
1 package dry yeast
sesame seeds for topping
Lightly grease baking sheet. Dissolve yeast in warm water and 1 teaspoon of
the sugar in large mixing bowl. Set aside for 15 minutes. Yeast mixture should triple in
size.
Heat milk in saucepan but do not boil. Dissolve remaining sugar and salt in milk.
Add butter. Blend thoroughly. Stir milk mixture into yeast. Add half the beaten egg and
blend well. Add flour until stiff dough is formed. Mix with hands and knead thoroughly.
Form into ball and place in bowl. Set in warm place for 1 hour or until dough doubles
in size. Punch down and roll to 1/2 inch thickness. Cut into 1 inch strips. Take 3 strips
and pinch ends together. For variation, form into ring by bringing both pinched ends
together and tucking together. Place on baking sheet, leaving room between loaves
for expansion. Cover with tea towel and set in warm place to rise. Loaves should
double in size.

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Preheat oven to 350F. Brush gently with remaining egg. Sprinkle with sesame
seeds. Bake for 25 minutes or until golden brown.
Catcher in the Rye Bread
2 cups all purpose flour
1 cup rye flour
2 tbsp. cornmeal
1 tbsp. caraway seeds
1/4 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
3/4 cups warm water
2 tbsp. warm water
1 egg
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 tbsp. honey
1 package dry yeast
fresh ground pepper to taste
Lightly grease baking sheet or loaf pan.
Combine yeast, 3/4 cups of water and sugar in small bowl. Set aside for 10
minutes.
Combine flours, caraway seeds and salt in large mixing bowl. Add yeast
mixture, honey, oil and 2 tablespoons warm water. Mix thoroughly until dough forms.
Place on floured surface and knead 10 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Form into
ball. Lightly oil clean bowl and roll dough in bowl to coat with oil. Cover and let dough
rise for 1 hour or until double in size. Punch down. Form ball and let rise again.
Preheat oven to 375F. Form loaf and place on baking sheet or in loaf pan. Beat
egg with 1 tablespoon water. Brush loaf with egg mixture. Sprinkle with caraway seeds
and pepper, if desired. Bake for 35 minutes or until golden brown and loaf sounds
hollow when tapped lightly.
Graham Bread

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4 cups graham flour
2 cups all purpose flour
4 tsp. baking soda
4 cups buttermilk
1 cup sugar
1 tsp. salt
Preheat oven to 350F and lightly grease 2 loaf pans.
Mix buttermilk and soda until frothy. Combine dry ingredients and add to
buttermilk mixture. Pour into loaf pan and bake for 1 hour or until golden brown. Cool
on wire rack before storing.
Egg Bread
6 cups all purpose flour
2 packages dry yeast
1 1/2 cups milk
1/3 cup butter
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp. salt
3 eggs
1 egg yolk, beaten lightly
sesame seeds
Lightly grease baking sheet to hold three loaves.
Sift together 2 cups of flour with yeast. In a saucepan heat milk, butter, sugar
and salt until warm. Mix 3 eggs into dry ingredients and beat at low speed for 1 minute,
then at high speed for 3 minutes. Beat in milk mixture. Stir in as much flour by hand as
possible.
Turn onto floured surface and knead in enough flour to make a smooth and
elastic dough. Shape into 3 balls and place in a greased bowl. Cover and let rise for
1½ hours or until dough has doubled in size. Punch down, cover and let rest for 15
minutes. Divide dough into three portions. Divide each portion into 3 ropes. Pinch
together ends of 3 ropes and braid, pinching other ends together. Place each loaf on

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baking sheet. Cover and let rise until double, about 45 minutes.
Preheat oven to 375F. Combine egg yolk and 1 tablespoon water. Brush on
loaves. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and bake 25 minutes or until golden brown.
Casserole Cornbread
2 cups self rising cornmeal
1/2 cup self rising all purpose flour
2 eggs
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 to 1/2 cup water
Preheat oven to 425F and lightly grease a round shallow ovenproof casserole,
or small cast iron skillet.
Mix all ingredients until batter has the consistency of cake batter. Pour into
casserole and bake for 30 minutes or until puffy and a cake tester inserted into the
center come out clean.
Cut into wedges and serve with Herb Butter (for recipe, see index)
See also:
Olive Bread from Provence

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Giving Thanks
My all time favorite time of the year is the Autumn. There is no time that feels
healthier or more invigorating to me. I love the feel of warm, sunny Fall days when the
air is crisp and clean. The faint smell of leaves burning somewhere and the sight of
squirrels hustling, bustling and burying frantically, reminds me that the cold Winter is
coming and I should relish these last warm days. Walking through the woods, kicking
multitudes of splendid-colored leaves, takes me back to a carefree childhood. It's the
best time of year to fall in love, walking hand in hand through the woods.
Having already given up their bounty, the fruit trees are almost bare of leaves.
The last few survivors rattle forlornly in the breeze blowing through the orchard but if you
cross the orchard diagonally from the Inn you'll come to a break in the stone wall where
there's a gate into the still leafy woods and meadow beyond. In the Fall, when the sun
lies slantwise across the sky, the woods seem to glow with a special dappled light
especially in the late afternoon.
A half a mile up the path, if you stop at the lightning blasted old oak tree stump
and look to your left, you can see the ruins of a tiny stone shack. I often wonder about
the pioneer who made the one room shelter. Was he an early homesteader blazing the
trail into an unknown countryside? Was he a lonely "mountain man", or was there a
woman and a family there keeping him company and enduring the hardships? I can
imagine Thanksgiving must have been especially meaningful to them, giving thanks for
an abundant harvest that would see them through a long Winter.
When you return to the Inn, check out the quilt hanging in the dining room. It's
called Autumn Splendor and is a bargello pattern design in a riot of green, gold and
rust colors to capture the look of the hills and the valley around the Inn. It hangs
opposite the window wall, so that it reflects the colors outside like a mirror in fabric. In
Autumn, colors, smells and food come together in a glorious patchwork of all the
senses. Below the quilt we set a long narrow serving table decorated with rustic
baskets full of orange and yellow gourds, along with juicy red apples and toasty brown
nuts. A bottle of tawny Sherry and glasses stand warming by a crisp fire. Help yourself.

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As the sun goes down, friends and family gather together and we serve our
Thanksgiving feast at an antique rectory table that seats fourteen at a squeeze. Two
hundred years later, we give thanks for our abundance and give thanks to the long
gone pioneers who built the little one room stone cabin in the woods.
Autumn is the time when I really enjoy making and eating soups. They make
light meals yet are warm and hearty fillers after a long brisk walk. Soups usually "age"
well and are even better the next day.
Never worry about not having stock or broth to make a soup. Many soups
taste just as good with water. You can make up for the richness that stock adds by
slightly decreasing the amount of water called for, or by adding a splash of wine.
I think country soups are best served in rustic crockery bowls. Always warm the
soup bowls before serving so the soup does not cool off too fast, and you can take
time to savor the flavor.
New England Clam Chowder
2 onions, chopped fine
3 potatoes, peeled and diced
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
4 cups milk
1/4 cup butter
1 tsp. fresh thyme
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
2 tins clams, with juice
6 slices bacon, cooked crisp and chopped
3 green onions, chopped
croutons to garnish
Melt butter in saucepan. Add onions, cook until fragrant but not brown. Add flour,
cook over low heat for 5 minutes. Cool slightly. Whisk in milk. Bring to a boil. Add

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potatoes, bacon, thyme, salt and pepper. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 20 minutes
or until potatoes are tender. Add clams and juice and reheat but do not boil. Add
seasoning. Garnish with croutons and chopped green onion. Serve with light Reisling
white or Muscadet wine.
Lighthouse Pork and Clam Chowder
2 lb. boneless pork, cut in 1/2­inch cubes
1 cup white wine
1 tbsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. salt
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 tsp. fresh­ground pepper
1 bay leaf
Combine marinade ingredients and pour over pork cubes. Chill overnight. Drain
well.
Chowder:
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 cup onion, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 28­ounce can tomatoes
1 cup chicken stock
1/4 cup tomato paste
1/2 tsp. thyme
dash cayenne
1 bay leaf
1 5­ounce can clams with liquid
In heavy saucepan, heat oil and brown pork cubes. Add onions, green pepper
and garlic. Saute until softened. Add tomatoes, chicken stock, tomato paste, thyme,
cayenne, bay leaf and remaining marinade. Simmer on low heat for 1 hour. Garnish
with grated lemon rind and minced parsley.

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Cheese and Potato Soup
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
5 potatoes, peeled and diced
2 cups chicken stock
2 cups milk
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 tsp. thyme
1/2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
individual loaves of round country bread
Melt butter in large saucepan. Add onion and garlic, cook without browning. Add
potatoes, stock, thyme and pepper. Bring to boil. Reduce heat, cook covered for 20
minutes or until potatoes are tender. Puree half of soup mixture, return to saucepan.
Add milk, heat thoroughly. Season to taste. Stir in cheese. Cook on low until cheese
melts.
To serve, cut tops of bread loaves. Hollow out, leaving 1 inch of thickness of
bread to form a "bowl". Brush the inside with olive oil and toast under the broiler for 10
minutes or until golden and crusty. Ladle hot soup into bread bowls, garnish with
parsley, and serve immediately. Serve with robust Cotes du Rhone wine.
Harvest Vegetable soup
2 medium onions, chopped
3 medium carrots, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 small zucchini, chopped
2 medium potatoes, peeled and diced
2 medium tomatoes, peeled and diced
2 tbsp. butter
2 cups milk
2 cups chicken stock

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3 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. salt
½ tsp. fresh ground pepper
Melt butter in saucepan. Add onions and garlic. Cook but do not brown. Add
carrots, celery, zucchini, potatoes, tomatoes, and half the parsley. Bring to boil, cover,
reduce heat and simmer 25 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Puree soup in
blender. Return to heat. Add milk. Cool thoroughly but do not boil. Season to taste.
Serve with a Chablis wine and cornbread. Garnish with remaining parsley.
Grampa's I Hate Pea Soup
When I was a very little girl I hated peas. Who doesn't? My Grampa used to
tell me that they were good for me and would "put hair on my chest". Somehow I knew
that I didn't want hair on my chest. Fortunately, I learned to like peas anyway, much
to the surprise of my family!
1 1/2 cups dry yellow split peas
4 cups chicken stock
2 cups cooked ham, chopped
1 cup carrots, shredded
1 cup onion, chopped
1 cup celery, chopped
2 tbsp. butter
3 cups milk
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Wash peas and place in saucepan. Add stock, ham, carrots, onion, celery and
butter. Bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 3 hours or until peas are tender.
Stir in milk. Add salt and pepper to taste. Reheat to serving temperature. Serve with
croutons and parsley garnish and chilled Chablis.
Yankee Doodle Minestrone Soup

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(When informed that it was actually a feather that he put in his hat and called
"macaroni", Michael's response was, "A noodle's a noodle!" Ed.)
4 slices bacon, cooked crisp and diced
1/2 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 1/2 cups condensed beef broth
1 large can spaghetti sauce
1 can kidney beans
1 cup water
1 cup carrots, sliced thin
1 cup zucchini, sliced
1/2 tsp. Italian seasoning
1/2 cup shell pasta
2 cups milk
2 tbsp. flour
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Cook bacon until crisp. Set aside. Cook onion and garlic in bacon drippings
until tender. Stir in beef broth, spaghetti sauce, kidney beans, water, carrots, zucchini
and seasoning. Bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 10 minutes or until
vegetables are tender. Add pasta. Cover and simmer 10 minutes until pasta is tender.
Stir small amount of milk into flour to make a paste, gradually stir in remaining
milk. Add to saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until mixture boils
and thickens. Add salt and pepper to taste. To serve, sprinkle bacon pieces and
garnish with Parmesan cheese. Serve with a red Chianti wine.
Asparagus Soup
1 lb. fresh asparagus (OK, so make this in the Spring or use frozen!)
2 cups chicken stock
1 onion, chopped fine
3 tbsp. flour
3 tbsp. butter

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2 cups milk
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Wash and dry asparagus, remove woody stem. Cut into large pieces and place
in saucepan with chicken stock and onion. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for
15 minutes or until tender. Cool. Place in blender and process until smooth.
Melt butter in saucepan, stir in flour. Gradually add milk and cook until mixture
boils slightly and thickens, stirring constantly. Stir in asparagus puree. Season to taste.
Reheat to serve. Serve with a Beaujolais wine.
Madeira Soup
2 1/2 cups chicken stock
2 1/2 cups beef stock
1/2 cup Madeira
4 leeks, washed and chopped
1 onion, chopped
3 tbsp. butter
3 tbsp. all purpose flour
1 lb. fresh mushrooms, chopped
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Melt butter in saucepan and add leeks and onions. Cook on medium-low heat
for 10 minutes or until tender. Sprinkle with flour and cook for another 5 minutes. Add
remaining ingredients and bring just to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered,
for 30 minutes or until mushrooms are soft.
Place in blender and puree until smooth. Return to pot and heat thoroughly
before serving. Garnish with chopped chives.
Curried Bisque
1 lb. small bay scallops (if large, cut in two)
1 cup milk
1/2 cup cream
1 can condensed tomato soup

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2 cups chicken stock
1 tbsp. butter
1/2 tsp. curry powder
2 tsp. onion, chopped fine
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
parsley
Wash scallops and pat dry with paper towels. Melt butter in saucepan. Add curry
powder and onion. Cook for 5 minutes. Add tomato soup and chicken stock. Bring to
a boil. Add scallops. Bring to boil again. Reduce heat to medium, cover and cook for
5 minutes. Stir in milk, cream and seasoning. Reheat but do not boil. Serve with a
garnish of parsley and a Chardonnay wine.
Presto Pesto Pasta Potage
4 tomatoes, peeled and chopped
1 onion, sliced
4 leeks, sliced thin
1/2 lb. green beans, sliced
4 zucchini, sliced
1/2 cup cauliflower florets
1 cup cooked Navy beans
7 cups chicken stock
1/4 lb. vermicelli pasta
1/2 cup pesto
1 cup Parmesan cheese
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup parsley
1/4 cup tarragon
1/4 cup oregano
1 tbsp. olive oil
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Heat oil in soup pot. Add leeks, onion, tomatoes, garlic, herbs, salt and pepper.

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Cook gently for 15 minutes. Stir in beans, zucchini and cauliflower. Boil chicken stock
and pour over vegetables, cook for 5 minutes. Add vermicelli. When pasta is tender,
remove from heat. Stir in pesto sauce. Garnish with Parmesan cheese and serve.
Barley and Ham soup
1/2 cup barley
1 cup fresh mushrooms, chopped
2 tbsp. salt pork or shortening
3 tbsp. green onions, chopped
4 cups stock from country cured ham
3 egg yolks, well beaten
1 cup cream
2 tbsp. parsley, chopped fine
Saute onions in salt pork until tender. Add barley and stir until barley is coated
with fat. Add stock. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes or until barley is
tender. Add mushrooms. Combine egg yolks with cream and stir into soup to thicken
as desired. Serve with a garnish of parsley. Serve with Merlot wine.
The World's Best Onion Soup
6 large onions, peeled and sliced thick
3 whole garlic heads, peeled
4 1/2 cups chicken stock
2 tsp. dried thyme
2 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1/2 tsp. salt
3 tbsp. soft butter
2 cups heavy cream
fresh parsley to garnish
Preheat oven to 350F
Combine onions and garlic in roasting pan. Add 3 cups stock and sprinkle with
thyme, pepper and salt. Dot with butter. Cover and bake for 1 1/2 hours. Stir pan

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occasionally while baking. Remove from pan and process in blender in batches until
smooth. Gradually add remaining stock and cream. Return to heat but do not boil. Heat
thoroughly and garnish with parsley to serve.
You Say Potato, I Say Tomato Soup
2 cups potatoes, sliced
6 cups water
5 cups tomatoes, sliced
2 cups onions, sliced
1/4 cup butter
1 cup cream
2 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. paprika
In a small skillet, saute onions in butter until tender. Add potatoes to boiling
water. Add onions, simmer for 30 minutes. Add tomatoes, sugar, salt and paprika.
Simmer, covered for 30 minutes. Cool. Process in blender until smooth. Reheat and
add cream. Do not boil again. Serve with Chardonnay wine.
Aunt Ivy's KORN­TV Chowder
4 tbsp. onion, chopped
1/2 cup celery, chopped
4 tbsp. green pepper, chopped
1 cup potatoes, peeled and diced
2 cups water
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. paprika
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 cups milk
2 cups whole kernel corn

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1/2 cup salt pork or shortening
Saute onion, celery and green pepper in salt pork until tender. Add potatoes,
water, salt, paprika and bay leaf. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes or
until potatoes are tender. Heat milk and add to soup mixture. Add corn and reheat but
do not boil. Serve garnished with parsley and a Sauvignon Blanc wine.
Gumby's Gumbo
1/2 lb. shrimp, shelled and deveined (Why did the shrimp cross the road? To
get to the Shell station!)
1/2 lb. crabmeat, flaked
1 lb. shelled oysters
1½ cups tomatoes, chopped
4 cups chicken stock
1/2cup onion, chopped
1 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. all purpose flour
2 cups okra, sliced thin
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
Saute onions in butter until tender. Stir in flour until blended smooth. Add
tomatoes and stock. Mix in okra stirring until smooth. Add shrimp and crabmeat.
Simmer until okra is tender. Add oysters, simmer 5 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley and
serve with a Sauvignon or Merlot wine.
Squishy Squash Soup
1 1/2 lbs. Summer squash, cut in chunks
1 lb. potatoes, cut in chunks
4 cups chicken stock or broth
3 green onions, chopped
3 tbsp. butter
3 tbsp. fresh dill, chopped
salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

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Place squash and potatoes in large pot. Cover with stock and bring to a boil.
Reduce heat, cover and simmer 20 minutes or until tender. Add butter, dill, salt and
pepper. Remove from heat. Place mixture in blender and process until smooth. Return
to pot and reheat thoroughly. Garnish with green onion and serve with Sauvignon Blanc
wine.
Souper Croutons To Top Them All
6 cups bread, cubed (leave crust on)
3 tbsp. olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
herbs of choice
fresh ground pepper
Toss bread in plastic bag with garlic, herbs and pepper. Saute in olive oil.
Remove from heat and dust with Parmesan cheese while still hot. Spread in single
layer on baking sheet to cool and crisp. Serve in side dish with soups and salads
See also:
Bulllwinkle and Boris' Borscht
Hearty Fish Soup (Greek)
South of France Fish Soup

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Holiday Memories
I have to admit to being real goofy about Christmas. Ever since I was a little girl,
I've always loved the festivities of preparing for the Holiday Season. And decorating
the Inn is one of the best times of the year, in anticipation of guests joining us for the
festivities. The main hall is one of the most important rooms in the Inn, and yet we seem
to use it more in the Winter than at any other time of the year, probably because of the
large stone hearth on the North wall. The previous owners had covered in all of the
fireplaces in the Inn and had used them only as decor to hold planters of ferns. We felt
that such beautiful cozy fireplaces should be used so we opened them up again. In front
of the fire sits one of our first, and favorite, antique purchases, a coffee table made
from a well-used farm sleigh. My father recalled using just such a sleigh to haul logs
from the woods in the Winter to heat the my great-grandmother's farmhouse. It still has
its original steel runners and the wood struts have been refinished to a mellow dark
wheat sheen. A modern top of half­inch thick plate glass has been added, so you can
still see the whole frame and the Axminster carpet below.
On either side of the fireplace are matching Hunter Green sofas and
green­and­gold striped wingbacked chairs. I have to admit I chose the Hunter Green
decor especially because I love how it looks at Christmas when we add pine boughs,
red bows, and all the red, green and gold trimmings we've collected over the years.
In an alcove behind one sofa we put up the tree. For years we've collected tree
ornaments from around the country. All old-fashioned, Currier-and-Ives looking, and
nostalgic. We try to find ornaments that are made from wood or cloth, and that enhance
a remembrance of Christmas past, Christmas of our childhood.
The main hall is really important to us for another reason. Michael and I married
just before Christmas one year, and moved immediately into a large, empty house. We
had nothing in those first days and months except a big house with wood floors, a
fireplace and a few boxes of stuff. Our bed was borrowed twin beds that sat in a corner
of the living room. We went out and bought a barbecue so we could cook our first
Christmas turkey.

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But we had a tree. Our first tree. It had only one set of lights, a few ornaments
and I made popcorn "snow" for the branches. But on Christmas Eve, we lit the fire and
put our sleeping bag and blankets on the floor beneath the tree and slept on the floor
that night. We kept the fire going all night and the tree lights on. We lay there watching
the shadows flicker around the bare walls and wondered how we would ever fill up the
big empty house. Four years later, the house was so full we started having "yard sales"
to eliminate the obsessive clutter!
In the morning we drank eggnog for breakfast and opened our presents.
Michael gave me a bird feeder and some Classical music tapes to replace the ones
I had lost. I gave him warm gloves and underwear. He's the romantic, obviously!
We've slept on the floor in front of a fireplace every Christmas Eve since then.
Even the year we were 9½ months pregnant and had just hosted a Christmas Eve
dinner party. The guests went home, the furniture was pushed back and down went the
quilts...and the three cats...and the dog...and us, Michael, me, and what was to become
our son, Geoffrey.
Christmas Eve is also when I decide what to add to my Christmas quilt. I have
a quilt that will take me twenty-five years to complete. It has twenty-five Christmas
wreaths on it and in the center of each wreath I embroider something that represents
a significant event for the year. The first was the year we married, so naturally our
wedding rings are entwined with the date. I've also added decals and embellishments
that are mementos of meaningful events, like teddy bears and baby blocks on the
wreath for the year Geoffie was born.
Christmas Eve is the time when we talk over the past year, and remember. It's
when we look forward to the coming year and a shiny new future.
Quilt Inn Country Style Stuffing
2 cups onions, chopped
2 cups celery, chopped
1 apple or pear
1 clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup butter

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4 tsp. sage
1 tsp. marjoram
1 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. savory
1/2 tsp. ginger
14 cups torn bread pieces
1/2 cup walnuts
1/2 cup currants, raisins, dates, prunes or dried apricots
1 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1 cup chicken stock or apple cider
Heat butter over medium heat. Add onion, celery, garlic, apple, marjoram,
thyme, savory and ginger. Cook for 15 minutes, stirring frequently until tender. Combine
bread, nuts, dried fruit, parsley and onion mixture. Season with salt and fresh ground
pepper to taste. Toss with chicken stock to slightly moisten if necessary.
Normally a turkey will hold around 1/2 cup of stuffing per pound of bird. Don't
pack it in too tightly or the stuffing will come out dense and soggy.
No matter what you do, you always seem to be left with too much stuffing for
the turkey. Place the rest in a lightly greased casserole, sprinkle with water (or wine)
and cover. Place in oven along with turkey for the last 45 minutes cooking time and
you will have extra stuffing for dinner or for adding to turkey sandwiches the next day.
Spinach and Rice Stuffing
If you find traditional bread stuffings too heavy try this instead.
1 10­ounce package frozen spinach, thawed and chopped
1 cup minced onion
1 cup fresh mushrooms, sliced
3 cups cooked rice (or mixed wild rice)
2 tbspfine breadcrumbs
3 cloves garlic, minced

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1 tsp. basil
1/4 tsp. summer savory
1/4 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper
2 egg whites, slightly beaten
Saute onions and mushrooms until tender. Remove from heat. Add rice, spinach
and all seasonings. Stir well. Stuff turkey and cook.
Variation:
Remove bone from 5 pound turkey breast. Flatten turkey meat to even
thickness. Spread spinach-rice mixture over turkey meat and roll up, jellyroll fashion.
Tie with heavy string. Brush with margarine. Bake uncovered at 325F for 2 hours,
basting occasionally. Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes before slicing.
Cut turkey roll into slices.
Cranberry Sauce
1 lb. cranberries
1 orange, minced
1 stick cinnamon
1/2 cup water
2 cups sugar
1/4 cup brandy
1/4 cup almonds, slivered
Simmer orange, cinnamon, cloves and water for 10 minutes. Add sugar and
berries. Simmer until berries split. Remove from heat. Add brandy and almonds. Chill
before serving.
Holiday Sprouts
2 lbs. Brussels sprouts
1 lb. fresh mushrooms, sliced

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1/4 cup onion, chopped
1 cup walnuts, chopped coarsely
3 tbsp. butter
1 tsp. nutmeg
Remove outer leaves of sprouts and cut an `x' into stem to speed cooking.
Steam sprouts 15 minutes or until tender.
Saute mushrooms in butter for 5 minutes or until golden. Add walnuts and
nutmeg and cook for 1 minute. Toss with sprouts just before serving.
Boxing Day Turkey
What to do with left-overs!
2 1/2 cups cooked turkey, chopped coarsely
3 slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup milk
1 onion, chopped coarsely
3 eggs, beaten lightly
1 tsp. thyme
3 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
2 tbsp. paprika
2 tbsp. melted butter
1 cup corn oil
2 cups bread crumbs, seasoned and dried
Soak bread in milk 10 minutes. Remove and squeeze excess milk. Shred and
set aside.
Combine turkey, bread, onion, eggs, thyme, and salt and pepper to taste in
mixing bowl. Place in blender and process until chopped finely. Cover and chill 1 hour.
Combine bread crumbs, parsley, paprika and butter. Shape chilled turkey
mixture into large patties. Coat with bread crumb mixture. Cover and chill again 1 hour.
Heat corn oil and 1 tablespoon butter in skillet. Cook turkey patties over
medium heat until golden on both sides. Serve with reheated leftover gravy.

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Turkey Hash
3 cups cooked turkey, chopped coarsely
3 cup potatoes, cooked and chopped coarsely
1/2 cup onion, chopped
1/2 cup red and green sweet peppers
1/2 cup mushrooms
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped fine
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 eggs, beaten lightly
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. salt
fresh ground pepper to taste
2 tbsp. olive oil
Combine turkey, potato, pepper, mushrooms, onions and parsley in mixing
bowl. Combine cream, egg, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, paprika, salt and pepper in
another bowl, mixing well. Stir cream mixture into turkey, coating well, and let stand 5
minutes.
Heat oil in skillet over medium heat. Add turkey mixture, cover and cook for 5
minutes or until bottom is set. Transfer to broiler and cook another 5 minutes or until top
is set and golden brown. Serve with a side salad and hot cider.
When I was growing up there was a French Canadian family living across the
street from us. Their Gaulic tradition was to celebrate Christmas on Christmas Eve
by going to midnight Mass, then returning home to open their presents and eat their
customary festive dinner. Gil served wonderful tourtiere meat pies and home made
pickles. We always teased her, calling them "tortured pies". The really great thing,
though, was visiting with them on Christmas Eve, and opening presents. Then they
shared our Anglo traditions the next day, and opened presents. Their children were

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younger than my brother and I so we all had lots of toys to play with on Christmas
day!
Tourtiere
2 pastry shells
2 lbs. ground beef
1 1/2 lbs. ground veal
1 lb. ground pork
3 cups mushrooms, chopped
1 package onion soup mix
1 celery stalk, chopped fine
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tsp. oregano
1/2 tsp. tarragon
1 1/2 cups dry red wine
cornstarch
salt and fresh ground pepper
Brown meat in large skillet. Add mushrooms, celery, spices, onion soup mix and
wine. Cook 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Make paste of 3 tbsp. cornstarch and 1/4
cup water. Thicken meat mixture. Coll slightly. Fill pie shell and cover with pastry.
Preheat oven to 425F. Cut vents in top pastry with sharp knife Bake for 25 to
30 minutes. Pastry should be golden brown. Serve with crisp dill pickles, mashed
potatoes and vegetable of choice. Serve with a robust Burgundy wine.
Tourtiere can be made ahead and frozen, either cooked or uncooked. Wrap
pies in heavy aluminum foil and freeze. To reheat cooked tortiere, leave in foil but
pierce with knife to allow steam to escape. Heat frozen pie in 350F oven for 1 hour.
Uncover and cook additional 5 minutes.
Pesto Potatoes Please
2 lbs. potatoes, peeled, halved, steamed until cooked
Pesto
1 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped

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4 cloves garlic, chopped
1/3 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted
1/3 cup olive oil
1 tsp. fresh ground pepper
1 tsp. salt
Place all ingredients in blender and puree. Mash potatoes by hand (like the
lumpy bits, it seems more home-made that way) with pesto sauce and serve.
My Mom has been making these delicious cookies since 1950. The original
recipe was German or Swiss but has been changed down through the years. Mom
uses Buckwheat honey and makes her own orange and lemon peel. (Recipe follows)
Basler Leckerli
1 cup ground mixed peel (recipe follows)
1 1/2 cups whole unblanched almonds
3/4 cups honey (try a flavored honey like Buckwheat or orangeblossom)
1 1/4 cups sugar
juice and zest of 1 lemon
1 1/2 tbsp. Kirsch or Brandy
4 cups all purpose flour
dash salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. cloves
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. baking soda
Grind almonds and fruit peel. Set aside.
Mix dry ingredients and place in mound on pastry board.
Heat honey and sugar to boiling point. Add lemon juice and zest. Remove from
heat. Add ground almonds, peel, Kirsch and stir until well blended.
Make a small well in center of dry ingredients and pour in honey mixture. Lightly
fold all ingredients together making soft crumbles. Do not make into a firm ball. When

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evenly mixed and still warm, sprinkle crumbles onto ungreased jelly roll pan or shallow
baking sheet with rim. Use rolling pin to flatten mixture in pan. Bake 15 to 20 minutes.
Cut into diamond or square shapes while still warm. Brush with a thin mixture of 1 cup
icing sugar and 3 tablespoons water. Allow to cool. Remove from pan and store.
(These will keep up to three months, if they last that long.)
Unbeatable Home-Made Candied Peel
12 oranges (or lemons)
sugar
Remove peel from fruit. Scrape soft pulp from inside of peels. Place peel in
saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a hard boil. Drain. Repeat two more times
with fresh water. This removes the bitter quinine taste from the peel. Drain, cool on
racks. Chop peel into strips or cubes suitable for specific use. Place peel in large
saucepan. Add 2 to 3 cups sugar to peel and stir well. Cover and set aside for two
days. Taste. Stir in up to 1 cup additional sugar if necessary to reach desired
sweetness.
Ladle into containers, cover and store in refrigerator. Will keep up to 6 months
or can be frozen.
Along with popcorn "snow", I like to make gingerbread "snowmen" to decorate
the Christmas tree. One year, friends with a three year old son were visiting us. A
week before Christmas I noticed many of the little brown men on the lower branches
had lost their feet. A couple of days later they had lost various arms and legs. By the
time Christmas morning rolled around, many had been reduced to dangling heads
on strings. Kyle had been surreptiously nibbling on them every time he passed the
tree.
Gingerbread "Snowmen" Ornaments
1/2 cup butter, softened
3/4 cu brown sugar

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1/4 cup molasses
1 egg
1 tbsp. grated orange rind
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp. ginger
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. ground allspice
1/2 tsp. cloves
1/4 tsp. cardamon
pinch salt
Cream butter and sugar in mixing bowl until fluffy. Beat in molasses, egg and
orange rind. Combine flour, ginger, cinnamon, baking soda, allspice, cloves, cardamon
and salt together. Gradually stir into sugar mixture until forms stiff dough. Gather dough
into ball. Knead slightly. Wrap and chill for 1 hour.
Let dough soften and roll between floured waxed paper sheets to 1/4­inch
thickness. Remove top paper. Use floured cookie cutters to make shapes. Use plastic
straw to poke hole near top, (for string to be inserted). Lift dough and paper onto
baking sheet and chill for 15 minutes, until firm.
Preheat oven to 35F. Transfer cookies to lightly greased, or nonstick, baking
sheet.Bake for 12 to 12 minutes or until slightly darkened around edges. Cook on
racks. Decorate as desired. Thread onto strings and hand on tree.
My Favorite Almond Fruitcake
2 cups raisins
1/2 cup citron peel
1 1/2 cups candied red cherries, halved
3/4 cups candied green cherries, halved
1 cup candied pineapple, in chunks
1/4 cup brandy
1/4 cup Amaretto di Saronna

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Place fruit in large bowl. Add brandy and Amaretto, mixing well. Cover and let
soak overnight.
Batter
3 cups all purpose flour
1/2 cup soft butter
1/2 cup shortening
3/4 cups sugar
4 eggs
1 tsp. almond extract
1/4 cup Brandy
1/4 cup Amaretto di Soronna
1/4 cup milk
1/3 cup ground almonds
3/4 cup whole almonds
Preheat oven to 275F and grease 6 small loaf pans. Line pans with heavy
brown paper and grease.
Mix whole almonds into fruit mixture. Dredge fruit in 1/2 cup of flour until all fruit
is coated. This prevents fruit from sinking to bottom of cake.
Beat butter and shortening in large mixing bowl until creamy. Gradually beat in
sugar, then add eggs one at a time and almond extract. Add 1 cup flour until just
combined. Beat in Brandy and Amaretto. Beat in 1 cup flour, then milk. Stir in ground
almonds. Fold batter into fruit mixture until fruit is evenly distributed.
Spoon into baking pans. Bake 50 to 60 minutes for small pans or up to 2 1/2
hours for larger pans. Test cake for doneness by inserting toothpick into center. It
should come out clean if properly cooked. Remove and cool on wire racks before
removing from pans.
If storing cake for a month or so before using, brush with additional Amaretto
or Brandy, wrap in cheesecloth and foil. Age for at least 2 weeks to allow flavors to
mellow.
Michael's Favorite Chocolate Fruitcake

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1 1/2 cups raisins
3/4 cup candied red cherries, halved
3/4 cup candied green cherries, halved
1/3 cup mixed fruit peel, chopped
3/4 cup dark rum
2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
7 oz. bittersweet chocolate
3/4 cups butter, softened
1 1/2 cups sugar
4 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1 1/2 tsp. vanilla
3/4 cups whole blanched almonds
Preheat oven to 325F and grease 6 small loaf pans.
Combine raisins, cherries, and peel in large mixing bowl. Stir in rum. Set aside
to marinate.
Combine flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside. Melt chocolate in double
boiler over gently boiling water. Beat butter and sugar together in mixing bowl until
creamy. Beat in eggs one at a time. Gradually beat in milk and vanilla, followed by
melted chocolate.
Drain fruit, adding rum to batter. Gradually beat in dry ingredients. Fold in fruit
and almonds. Spoon into pans, distributing evenly. Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until cake
tester inserted into center comes out clean.
Cool on wire racks before removing from pans. Brush with additional rum. Wrap
in cheesecloth, then foil. Age for two weeks to allow the flavors to mature.
There are as many ways to make shortbread as there are cooks to prepare
it. Here are four you should try.
Shortbread Number One

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2 cups cake and pastry flour
2/3 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
1 cup butter, soft
Preheat oven to 300F.
Sift flour and sugar together. Add butter by rubbing into the flour mixture by hand
until mixture forms coarse crumbles. Gather into ball. Knead gently to form dough. Do
not overknead or dough becomes too sticky. Add a little more flour if necessary. Gently
roll dough on floured surface to desired thickness.
Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Prick with a fork. Bake 1
hour or until golden brown around edges.
Shortbread Number Two
1 lb. softened butter
2 cups all purpose flour
1 cup icing sugar
1 cup cornstarch
1 tsp. vanilla
Preheat oven to 300F.
Cream butter until fluffy. Sift dry ingredients together. Fold into butter until
smooth. Stir in vanilla. Refrigerate dough until easy to handle. Roll dough into 1 inch
balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Flatten slightly with a fork. Bake 20 to 30
minutes or until edges turn slightly brown.
Shortbread Number Three
3 sticks butter, softened
1 cup confectioners' sugar
3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 tsp. salt
1 tsp. vanilla extract
a cup lemon zest, grated
Cream butter and sugar in large mixing bowl. Sift flour and salt together and add

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to butter mixture. Add vanilla and lemon zest. Blend thoroughly. Make ball of dough and
chill several hours.
Preheat oven to 325F. Remove dough from refrigerator and let come to room
temperature. Press into round cake pan. Sprinkle with granulated sugar. Using a sharp
knife, cut outline of wedges into batter. Bake for 20 minutes or until shortbread is
slightly browned. Cool for 5 minutes. Cut wedges along pre-marked lines and remove
from pan. Cool on wire racks.
Shortbread Number Four
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups butter, softened
l cup fruit sugar
l cup sifted rice flour
l 1/2 cups coarsely chopped belgian milk chocolate
Spread flour evenly on baking sheet. Broil for 2 minutes or until flour turns
golden, (watch carefully). Turn flour using spatula and continue to broil until golden
throughout.
In large mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Stir in rice flour. Stir in browned
flour. Blend well by hand. Dough will be stiff. Do not overblend. Mix in chopped
chocolate chunks. Chill dough 1 hour.
Preheat oven to 300F. Drop dough by tablespoonfuls onto ungreased baking
sheet. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until golden on bottom and edges. Cool on racks.
Extravagant Party Shortbread
Dip half of each shortbread piece in
Dipping Chocolate
8 oz. semisweet Chocolate squares
1/4 bar paraffin wax
Melt wax in top of double boiler. Add chocolate squares. Stir and mix well until
chocolate melts. Remove from heat and briefly dip shortbread in sauce. Work quickly.

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Place on wire rack or wax paper to cool. If chocolate sauce thickens, reheat.
Green Tomato Mincemeat
12 cups green tomatoes, peeled and chopped
12 cups tart apples, peeled and chopped
2 cups currants
4 cups raisins
3 tbsp. salt
3 tbsp. cloves
3 tbsp. nutmeg
4 tbsp. cinnamon
5 lbs. brown sugar
1/2 lb. suet, finely chopped (optional)
2 cups vinegar
Combine all ingredients (except suet) and cook over medium heat until liquid
is reduced. (Add suet). Pour into sterilized jars and seal.
Rhubarb Mincemeat
2 cups apples, diced
2 cups rhubarb, diced
zest of 1 orange
juice of 1 lemon
1 cup raisins
1/2 cup currants
1/4 cup citron peel
2 1/2 cups brown sugar
1/2 cup water
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/4 tsp. nutmeg

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Combine all ingredients in large pot. Bring to a boil and cook for 30 minutes or
until mincemeat is thick and clear. Pour into sterilized jars and seal.
Cheater's Mincemeat
Don't worry, Grandma would have probably done this herself if commercial
mincemeat was available in her day.
There are a number of good commercial mincement mixes available. But to
enhance their flavor and add some easy home-made-ness to them, to every l½ cup of
commercial mincement try adding:
10 oz. applesauce, or 5 green apples, chopped,
or add:
1/4 cup maple syrup or brown sugar and
2 tbsp. butter and
2 tbsp. Rum or Sherry
Candy Cane Shooter
A delicious holiday cocktail to sip slowly as you do your baking or decorating.
Tastes like a candy cane!
1/4 oz. green Creme de Menthe
1/2 oz. peppermint Schnapps
1/4 oz. cherry Brandy
Gently pour liqueurs, in order, over back of spoon into a clear liqueur glass. Try
this with other combinations of liqueurs. The key is to have each layer lighter than the
one below so they don't mix. The higher the alcohol content, the lighter the liqueur.
Hot Rum Punch
4 cups light Rum
2 cups Cognac
2 cups Cointreau
1 lemon, sliced thin

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1 orange, sliced thin
8 cups boiling water
Combine Rum, Cognac, Cointreau, sugar, orange and lemon in heat­proof
punch bowl. Add boiling water, stir well. Serve hot.
Eggnog With a Bite
2 dozen eggs, separated
2 cups sugar
2 cups Bourbon
2 cups milk
1 quart whipping cream, whipped
dash ground nutmeg
Beat egg yolks in mixing bowl until thick and lemon colored. Gradually add
sugar, beating continuously. Stir in milk and Bourbon, blending well.
Beat egg whites until stiff. Gently fold whites into milk mixture. Fold in whipped
cream. Sprinkle with nutmeg before serving.
Spiced Tea
2 lemons
1 1/2 tsp. whole cloves
8­2 cup teabags
2 tsp. whole cloves
2 tsp. whole allspice
10 cups boiling water
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups orange juice
1/2 cup lemon juice
Cut lemon into thick slices, stud with whole cloves and set aside.
Combine teabags and remaining spices in large pot. Pour in boiling water.
Cover and let steep for 15 minutes. Remove tebags and spices. Add orange and
lemon juices and sugar, stirring until dissolved. Served in a warmed punch bowl, float

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lemon slices on top.
Old-Fashioned Wassail Updated
2 quarts apple cider
2 cups ginger ale
1 tbsp. liquid honey
3 whole cloves
4 cinnamon sticks
1 orange, sliced
1 lemon, sliced
Combine ingredients in large pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer
1 hour. Strain mixture, discarding spices. Serve in warmed punch bowl.
Christmas Punch
2 cups raspberries
1 pint raspberry sherbet
1 1/2 quarts cranberry juice
1 1/2 quarts ginger ale, chilled
Combine cranberry juice, ginger ale and raspberries in a chilled punch bowl.
Drop sherbet by scoops into punch. Serve immediately.
Icy Christmas Coffee
6 oz. strong coffee
2 tsp. sugar
2 tsp. Creme de Menthe
1/4 tsp. mint extract
1 scoop vanilla ice cream
ice cubes
Combine ice, coffe and sugar in tall glass. Stir to dissolve sugar. Add Creme
de Menthe, mint extract and ice cream. Serve with candy cane hooked over edge of
glass.

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
Christmas Carolers' Chocolate
For each person
Melt 2 oz. semisweet chocolate in top of double boiler, then whisk in 1 cup milk
and heat thoroughly.
Snowballs in the Mud
Prepare hot chocolate as above, and to each mug add 1/4 tsp. mint extract or
1/2 tsp. Creme de Menthe. Float marshmallow snowballs on top and serve with
chocolate mint stick.

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
The Quilters
We didn't have much money growing up. I never really noticed its lack. Every
Summer I went to a cool small town where Grandma lived while my Dad sweated it out
in the city.
When I was five, I thought my Grandma was the only woman in the world who
quilted. She was a magician. I watched her cut scraps of fabric and arrange the multi-
colored shapes like fabric tiles in a giant jigsaw puzzle. She'd let me help sometimes
if I wasn't too fidgety. Then she would start to sew them all together. Piece by piece.
It took too long so I went out to play.
When I was ten, Grandma took me to the church basement where a dozen of
her friends gathered around a creaky wood frame. I was surprised that Grandma had
taught all these other women to play her colorful game. They sat and quickly stitched
the quilt with fine straight stitches. They let me make iced tea and bring them cookies
and thread their needles until my eyes were too tired and cross-eyed to see. As they
talked and laughed, I went to sleep on a pile of musty smelling pillows. Grandma would
wake me and I'd stumble sleepily home in the dark with her.
When I was fifteen, going with Grandma was more of a duty than anything. It's
not that I didn't love her, you know. It was just that I wanted to be out doing other things.
And besides they had this real annoying habit. By then I had my own place at the
quilting frame. They would just get into talking about something really interesting and
juicy, when someone would clear their throat and tilt their head ever-so-slightly in my
direction. Like deft jugglers they would briskly turn the conversation to something else.
Walking home in the dark, pestered with my questions, Grandma never could seem to
recall what they had been talking about.
When I was eighteen, I was lucky to get a night job at Miller's Dairybar to help
out with college tuition. When I was sorry I couldn't go quilting with Grandma, she said,
"Don't worry. Your education is more important. You've spent enough time hanging
around with us old ladies." Two days before I left for college, Mr Miller said, "Take
tomorrow off. You worked hard all Summer," and he gave me my last paycheque.

The Quilt Inn Country Cookbook
Aliske Webb
Grandma didn't seem surprised. She just said, "Good. You can come to the church with
me."
We spent my last Summer evening machine quilting crib quilts for the children's
ward at the community hospital. Moving with the times, for some of the ladies, sewing
machines had taken over where arthritic fingers could no longer go. That evening we
talked of everything with no taboos. They listened with grace and affection to my talk
of the bright future. They shared town gossip and laughed wickedly at things genteel
little old ladies shouldn't know anything about. I was appalled and tickled and pleased
that I was finally included in the circle of women.
As I absent-mindedly made iced tea in the worn and badly-painted church
kitchen, I wondered if I would ever see these scandalous ladies ever again. I didn't
know how to say goodbye to them. I had a sense and secret hope that life was going
to take me off in new and exciting, and far away directions. There were whisperings
and rustlings from the other room as I returned with the tray of ice-tinkling glasses. The
bumpy linoleum floor was cool under my bare feet, on the late Summer eve.
"We never could decide what to give you for graduation or for going away to
college. So here. This is for you," Grandma said. "From all of us." She handed me a
wrinkled brown paper grocery bag that was soft and limp with use. In it was a quilt. A
beautiful quilt. An amazing quilt. A quilt for me. It was a friendship quilt with a block
signed by every one of them. They had worked on it all Summer. I cried and hugged
them all.
They, too, were saying goodbye. Goodbye, and we'll always be here for you.